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Apr 17, 2021
31
12
21
Inverclyde
Found this looks like decent uk/America material also when the shops opened I went to a charity shop and it looked like a bushcrafter patched a lot of dece t gear-safe to say I bought most Haha c:
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,169
1,262
Berlin
I think his frame isn't strong enough.
I would make it from oak if possible because it will last longer than pine.

Between the walls and the sand I would put three building site tarps of the dimension 3x2 m to protect the wood against moisture and avoid that sand falls always into your room and onto your bed and so on.

The walls become bit more than 2 m high and exactly 3 m long, in the end the short wall 2 m inside, outside the tarp will overlap approximately 20cm around the corners. On top you put a larger tarp that overlaps too of course.

The ground of your room is a bit higher than the way to it. Like that water doesn't float into your room. It must float downhill.
If the terrain isn't steep enough you have to make an artificial hill from the earth you digged out. In late Autumn you plant little bushes on top of that hill to cover it. The roots also will hold the earth.

The door you set into the middle, not into the corner. There you put such a work shop stove that holds the heat over night.


You also can cook on it and don't smell like a bacon, what you would pretty soon do if you just use an open fire.

The stove tube leaves the shelter relatively high through the wall.
There you dig in a mast to hold the tube upwards.
You need 30 cm free space to walls and mast, if not it will catch fire. You protect the walls around the stove with a stone wall or metal sheet. Where the tube goes through the wall you put it in a larger tube, metal or ceramic. With approximately 5 cm air space.

In front of the entrance you plant a hedge. If you take as much as possible earth with the roots and keep that moist the bushes should survive even if displaced adult. But you need to cut away 50 % of the branches when you displace them.

in front of them I would plant young pine in approximately 5 metres distance.

Put the stove diagonal in the opposite corner of your pillow, that is very important to keep it under control.

If you lay on the back and sit up your left hand is at the wall, your right hand could point with a knife to the door.

You could build a stonewall open fireplace but that I wouldn't do because such a stove above is far more comfortable and secure. And I even didn't look for the cheapest. You can find that new for 100 €.

Don't take a stove with a glass window, the cheap ones are dangerous because they don't last and you have no emergency exit.

The door must open to the inside, if not you could get trapped in by snow or sand. If open it is located on the opposite side of the stove of course.

Like that it would also protect you as a shield if you close it holding the hatchet or knife in the right hand.

If you are left handed the whole interior has to be organised in the opposite way of course.

In middle agest the doors had been pretty low, because like that you can hit someone who enters better with the axe onto the head, while he is looking at your feet.

I probably wouldn't slaughter everybody immediatly who visits me, but would keep the option open.

Of course you lock the door at night with a thick stick that hangs in forks at both sides and blocks it.
 
Last edited:

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,169
1,262
Berlin
Cut your already dry firewood early in the summer and keep it dry! You need surely 5 cubic metres during the winter if not more.
 
Last edited:

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
6,704
1,637
Bedfordshire
I have a few questions about how this place is going to be secret.

How quickly can such a large digging project be done when the ground isn't sand? If the site is visible to passers-by, how secret will it really be if something is seen during construction?

During construction there will be a lot of moving around the site. This will disturb vegetation, compact the ground, there will certainly be the dug out soil. How will that be hidden?

After it is finished, if the site can be seen by people going past, what will stop them from seeing the beaten footpath that will lead to the "hidden" door?

Similarly, if you are in the shelter, how will you know if there is anyone around who you do not want to know about the shelter? If you have a fire on, or a stove, that will put a plume of smoke up, which will look pretty interesting if it is appearing from a hole in the ground. If you need to come up and open the door, what stops you from popping out of the hole while someone is watching?
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
5,354
4,709
Mid Wales
I’d be concerned that someone doesn’t block the door way while I was inside?

There was a novel, I read years ago, about a British sniper hiding in an underground bunker from Nazi's that had come over to execute him - I can't remember the name of the novel or the author. The German assassin found his bunker and blocked the exit and the ventilation - an underground bunker is the last place I would want to be if I didn't trust the people above!
 

nigelp

Full Member
There was a novel, I read years ago, about a British sniper hiding in an underground bunker from Nazi's that had come over to execute him - I can't remember the name of the novel or the author. The German assassin found his bunker and blocked the exit and the ventilation - an underground bunker is the last place I would want to be if I didn't trust the people above!
Rouge Male - Geoffrey Household
Old one but worth a read.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,169
1,262
Berlin
Perhaps @TLM Is right.
An emergency exit could have the size of a window.
But without it the construction is far more stable.

A realistic question is who could get the idea to rob you out or murder you.

I don't lock my door in my construction trailer. I didn't see too many bad films and have no enemies. But the house of my brother is next by and he has a dog and a fence around the ground.

We are the weird ones, not the others.
 
Last edited:
Apr 17, 2021
31
12
21
Inverclyde
I thought of some of that but I have no budget really and the land owner said as long as when the shelters done I can't see anything and walk on the ground bar a hatch or that

I have a few questions about how this place is going to be secret.

How quickly can such a large digging project be done when the ground isn't sand? If the site is visible to passers-by, how secret will it really be if something is seen during construction?

During construction there will be a lot of moving around the site. This will disturb vegetation, compact the ground, there will certainly be the dug out soil. How will that be hidden?

After it is finished, if the site can be seen by people going past, what will stop them from seeing the beaten footpath that will lead to the "hidden" door?

Similarly, if you are in the shelter, how will you know if there is anyone around who you do not want to know about the shelter? If you have a fire on, or a stove, that will put a plume of smoke up, which will look pretty interesting if it is appearing from a hole in the ground. If you need to come up and open the door, what stops you from popping out of the hole while someone is watching?
I've got most of that planned out already while excavating as long as I don't take to long I'll have like tarps up shutting out like a construction site, and the chimney will be put through to one of the fenced of fields and while police don't deter them farmers and their fielded off bit and they don't go as far plus there's a path to one of they're places with a walked In path so I plan to use that to re-route from my drposesoor that'll go inward for safety reasoning
 
Apr 17, 2021
31
12
21
Inverclyde
Perhaps @TLM Is right.
An emergency exit could have the size of a window.
But without it the construction is far more stable.

A realistic question is who could get the idea to rob you out or murder you.

I don't lock my door in my construction trailer. I didn't see too many bad films and have no enemies. But the house of my brother is next by and he has a dog and a fence around the ground.

We are the weird ones, not the others.
Less steal more destroy, **** with, ruin ect or if its one's I know I Don't want people know I'm as they'd see it 'homeless and living in a mud hole' even if it's all fancy and done good
 
Apr 17, 2021
31
12
21
Inverclyde
I think his frame isn't strong enough.
I would make it from oak if possible because it will last longer than pine.

Between the walls and the sand I would put three building site tarps of the dimension 3x2 m to protect the wood against moisture and avoid that sand falls always into your room and onto your bed and so on.

The walls become bit more than 2 m high and exactly 3 m long, in the end the short wall 2 m inside, outside the tarp will overlap approximately 20cm around the corners. On top you put a larger tarp that overlaps too of course.

The ground of your room is a bit higher than the way to it. Like that water doesn't float into your room. It must float downhill.
If the terrain isn't steep enough you have to make an artificial hill from the earth you digged out. In late Autumn you plant little bushes on top of that hill to cover it. The roots also will hold the earth.

The door you set into the middle, not into the corner. There you put such a work shop stove that holds the heat over night.


You also can cook on it and don't smell like a bacon, what you would pretty soon do if you just use an open fire.

The stove tube leaves the shelter relatively high through the wall.
There you dig in a mast to hold the tube upwards.
You need 30 cm free space to walls and mast, if not it will catch fire. You protect the walls around the stove with a stone wall or metal sheet. Where the tube goes through the wall you put it in a larger tube, metal or ceramic. With approximately 5 cm air space.

In front of the entrance you plant a hedge. If you take as much as possible earth with the roots and keep that moist the bushes should survive even if displaced adult. But you need to cut away 50 % of the branches when you displace them.

in front of them I would plant young pine in approximately 5 metres distance.

Put the stove diagonal in the opposite corner of your pillow, that is very important to keep it under control.

If you lay on the back and sit up your left hand is at the wall, your right hand could point with a knife to the door.

You could build a stonewall open fireplace but that I wouldn't do because such a stove above is far more comfortable and secure. And I even didn't look for the cheapest. You can find that new for 100 €.

Don't take a stove with a glass window, the cheap ones are dangerous because they don't last and you have no emergency exit.

The door must open to the inside, if not you could get trapped in by snow or sand. If open it is located on the opposite side of the stove of course.

Like that it would also protect you as a shield if you close it holding the hatchet or knife in the right hand.

If you are left handed the whole interior has to be organised in the opposite way of course.

In middle agest the doors had been pretty low, because like that you can hit someone who enters better with the axe onto the head, while he is looking at your feet.

I probably wouldn't slaughter everybody immediatly who visits me, but would keep the option open.

Of course you lock the door at night with a thick stick that hangs in forks at both sides and blocks it.
If I knew how to put pics on this I'd show you my plan/diagrams I've put all of this to mind I've watched so many videos I kinda know what's the risks, I was into it before and but after my gran said she'd but me out I ramped up cause I've got a dog I know it'll take longer for them. As I've said I'd rather be on the street with delvok than in a centre the centre is terrible anyway couldn't stand a day there lol.
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,169
1,262
Berlin
One even could live in a tent with the right equipment.
But the difference to recreational winter camping adventures is that you need to do something in a permanent shelter and if you want to read in the sleeping bag you get very cold hands below 5*C.

And it is much cheaper to use a usual 3 seasons equipment in a heated cottage than buying a good winter camping equipment.
 

Woody girl

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 31, 2018
3,251
2,320
63
Exmoor
I know you think this is a solution to your problem, but seriously I'd not consider it. I see Damp and the dangers of asphyxiation and collapse, theft, illness, loneliness and many other problems.
Having been homeless in the long ago past and surviving through a pretty good summer was hard work , so I can speak from experience that even more than 45 years later is still vivid.
Come the late autumn/winter it was almost unbearable.
I don't know your circumstances, and won't ask you, but I think you can do better for yourself than this idea.
When I was young(17yrs old) going through that, there was not the support or recognition of homelessness there is today, so it was very hard for a vunerable young girl, and maybe this colours my views.
I would suggest that you might consider a live in job where you might get some basic accommodation, such as a caravan on a farm, or as I eventualy found, a kennels.
You obviously love dogs, having one yourself. So its worth looking at.
That put me in the way of getting another job, milking cows on a farm... with a broken wrist too! But I managed, and learned to drive a tractor too!
I had to move away from my area to get that job, but although at the time that felt scary as I was desperate to hold on to the little bit of friendship and support I had, it was the best thing I did to put me back on the road to a normal life.
Just my penny's worth. Hopefully something to think about.
Good luck mate.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,169
1,262
Berlin
I agree that it's currently the best time to look for a job on a farm as the season starts exactly now.

But because it becomes warm now he hasn't to build in the stove now, and such a shelter can be done cheap and pretty fast. It will become everything else than a palace but an own place is good to have, even if it's simple like that.

In such a situation I would first reduce and change my belongings to a well working 4 seasons winter trekking and bushcraft, equipment, especially as long as I have a post address and can receive packets with military surplus equipment.
I would buy a large British Army rucksack, such a 120 litres bag or better a Dutch army Saracen rucksack. And a brand new Snugpak Special Forces 2 bag sleep system with a nearly new British army bivvy bag and British army shelter sheet and so on.
If in doubt what's needed we can tell our opinions about it in a separate thread.

And then I would make me such a shelter to have a place to be.

And then I would immediatly start to look for a job somewhere. And if I can get one, go immediately there, set up my camp on a farm for example and try that out.

In my opinion the key is flexibility and if I reduce my belongings to a 120 litres bushcraft equipment I become extremely flexible and independent.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,169
1,262
Berlin
I think the material to copy such an Anderson shelter is relatively expensive and not so easy to bring to the forest.

But WWOOFing could be a very good idea. The pocket money that's earned there I would immediatly invest in a very good 4 seasons bushcraft equipment. Not especially expensive but well chosen military surplus equipment in very good conditions.

I lived before the Corona pandemia for years out of the rucksack and can tell you that most civil equipment will not last very long in continuous use. It usually isn't worth the investment. A few exceptions exist of course from this rule.
But in a hurry without detailed informations the used military equipment in good conditions is the best low budget option, because it is constructed to last as long as possible.

Sleeping bags I always buy new, because used ones can be broken inside.
 

Athos

Full Member
Mar 12, 2021
127
99
East Sussex
I think the material to copy such an Anderson shelter is relatively expensive and not so easy to bring to the forest.

But WWOOFing could be a very good idea. The pocket money that's earned there I would immediatly invest in a very good 4 seasons bushcraft equipment. Not especially expensive but well chosen military surplus equipment in very good conditions.

I lived before the Corona pandemia for years out of the rucksack and can tell you that most civil equipment will not last very long in continuous use. It usually isn't worth the investment. A few exceptions exist of course from this rule.
But in a hurry without detailed informations the used military equipment in good conditions is the best low budget option, because it is constructed to last as long as possible.

Sleeping bags I always buy new, because used ones can be broken inside.
I know for a fact I wouldn’t sell one of my used sleeping bags for fear of unwanted children turning up years from now.

Wriggle tin is expensive now but the construction principle is the same. Civvy kit is designed for the occasional user unless you buy high end kit. As for military kit, the older it is the tougher, cheaper and less comfortable it is. Buy kit from the 80’s and you’ve probably hit the sweet spot, if it can get blokes through the Falklands then it’s solid gear.
 
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Hultafors Outdoor knife for Sale

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