Old tools compared to new tools

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demographic

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 15, 2005
4,467
474
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After much looking around, I found the old C.K bit set that I'd mentioned earlier. It was called 6 in 1. I remember now that I changed one of the PZ2 bits over to PH2 because I noticed that it is a Wekador and that reminded me.

There's a new C.K set similar but it doesn't have a brass finish bit holder.

My Wera Impaktor bit set arrived and I've tried a few 5 & 6 sized screws into a plank of wood to try it out. The PZ bits are still perfect. I'm not too fussed on the big bulky Impaktor bit holder though. I can see the slide out magnetic collar being handy for holding a screw on the drill to reach an awkward place but for general, especially repeat, screwing I think it would soon be a nuisance.

I think I have one of those bit holders kicking about somewhere, its got a magnetic collar around the bit and I think I needed to pull the sliding outer to get the bits out.

Problem was when there was dust or something in the holder and it became awkward to get it to release the bit.
Plus visibility of the screwhead wasn't good so I couldn't see when the screw was nicely seated just beneath the surface of the timber.
I like the basic bit holders better.

I have a load of the little plasterboard bits, like this...
66573.jpg

Which are variable in quality. When brand new they seat the screws too deep so the buglehead screw breaks through the paper (causing pops in the plaster eventually) but after a bit of use they wear in better and the bugleheads just indent the paper right.
Like the one on the right here.
4er5h.jpg

I tend to start them out on other screws to pre-wear them a bit.

Then on some of them the collar comes off but thats easy enough to epoxy back on.
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
9,476
2,214
McBride, BC
Somewhere, I've got a couple of drill heads with clutches built in.
Blast in the dry-wall screw and the head lets go of the screw just as it dimples the paper.
 

Eighteen12

Forager
Feb 5, 2017
150
6
UK
Tip #1. Impact driving for dummies. Like me.

Don't reach for a screw after playing around driving it in and out of a plank a few times with the impact drill.

Two burn blisters later.... :(

On a serious note, I'm impressed with the Wera Impaktor bits. I've used their PZ2 and 3 a right amount now and they're both perfect. I also got an Irwin Impact bit set. I haven't used it yet but the bit holder is really tight to put the bits into. There's a retaining ring and it makes the whole thing super tight. It takes a fair amount of force to put the bit into the holder and not too far off needing pliers to take it out again. I'd use the longer 50mm bits with this just to have more grip for in/out of the holder.
 

Eighteen12

Forager
Feb 5, 2017
150
6
UK
Oh, I almost forgot with all the other stuff. I decided to get a new hammer when I was ordering the bits.

As usual there are hundreds of everything and I was tempted to go for another Stanley like my yellow/black fibreglass one which have served me well for a good few years. After much looking around, and in keeping with this thread title, I went with an old pattern in a new design. An Estwing English pattern claw.

I'm not battering from morning to night so I like a heavy hammer, and this one is a cracker.
 

demographic

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 15, 2005
4,467
474
-------------
Oh, I almost forgot with all the other stuff. I decided to get a new hammer when I was ordering the bits.

As usual there are hundreds of everything and I was tempted to go for another Stanley like my yellow/black fibreglass one which have served me well for a good few years. After much looking around, and in keeping with this thread title, I went with an old pattern in a new design. An Estwing English pattern claw.

I'm not battering from morning to night so I like a heavy hammer, and this one is a cracker.

I have a few Estwings now, My main user if a curved claw 20 Oz leather grip Estwing and if I'm doing lots of timber framing or shuttering I have a straight clawed 24 Oz Vinyl grip one

The leather grip ones eventually get rattly (they can be repaired though) but because less people have them I don't think they get nicked as often off site.
As they are more identifiable I think they don't walk as often. Maybe.

They don't bray nails in any better and the Vinyl ones likely last slightly better without any grinding off the steel washer and replacing leather washers.

I have a few more leather grip ones bought for a fiver or so from my secondhand local tool seller but they need slight attention, I only bought them to fix up and so far I've not had time.
 

Eighteen12

Forager
Feb 5, 2017
150
6
UK
I was tempted to get the leather gripped Estwing when I was buying my English Pattern hammer earlier but decided to go with the regular blue handle. I wish I had went with the leather now!

On the other end of the scale, I also got one of their smallest hammers, the 8oz Ball Pein. It's built the exact same way as its big brother and has a beautiful weight and balance to it. I've the exact same head, only on an old long wooden handle, and the Estwing is a far superior hammer.

So, a rare example of newer being better than older.... :)
 

Eighteen12

Forager
Feb 5, 2017
150
6
UK
When you begin looking at stuff like Wera, Knipex and Gedore it's easy to think about buying new stuff.

I've already changed over most of my pliers, nippers and side cutters but I'd avoided screwdrivers because there's no real damage or much wear to the ones I have. But I was just too tempted by the Wera Chisel Driver set and bought the 900 set along with three larger slots in 10, 12 and 14. It all arrived yesterday and I'm very impressed. Except for the smallest 3.5 slot, they are all built for light hammering with the shaft fully through the handle up to the raised round metal head on the handle top. As well as that, they have a section on the shaft for attaching a spanner or any grippers to help tighten/slacken. Like the green and black ratchet I got a few days ago, they have the plastic & grippy rubber feel double material finish, only this time in yellow and black except for the 12 and 14 slot which are all black.

They also have a wall mount. It had two fittings on the top but it was a bit floppy when hung up so I added another screw and bolt to the bottom which helped tighten everything up. The large slots came loose so I put them up with cup hooks beside the mount. A very nice set and, again, not the rent of the town to buy.
 

demographic

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 15, 2005
4,467
474
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On about old pliers and so on I have a set of old compound action end cutters, found them in a box in a skip and they have been great for years now.
They are good as pincers, for pulling nails out and even at a pinch manage to cut right through 3.2mm Paslode nails (takes a bit of effort but I've done it with them for years now and the jaws are still good) when needed.

Not bad considering they are short enough to fit into my joiners nail pouch and live there every day.

This is a picture of some like the ones I own, taken off the internet.

Bernard Compound action end cutters. Patented in 1899 Worth looking out for and if they are in good condition, buy em.
bernard-cutter-a.jpg



The design for them was patented in 1899
 

Eighteen12

Forager
Feb 5, 2017
150
6
UK
Fantastic, quality cutters! I must keep an eye out if I see them around eBay. Some workmanship and thinking out there when you imagine they were designed at least 118 years ago.

I got a pair of Gedore pincers recently but I'd give them up in a heartbeat for those old boys.... :)
 

Eighteen12

Forager
Feb 5, 2017
150
6
UK
After buying some Pozi bit sets, I decided to get a couple of new longer length bit holders which locked. I have a 150mm magnetic Irwin and sometimes the bits would stick in the screw head as the grip isn't too strong.

Looking around, I went with a pair of NEO in 150 & 300mm. After watching a couple of videos which showed some of the longer ones being a bit wonky, I was quick to test these out and they both run dead true (my Irwin bit always had a wobble when running) The lock up is snappy with a minimum amount of play. They're really nice. I'm tempted by the Wera with a ring magnet to hold larger screws but it's a bit too steep for all I'd need it for although I might try it later on.

Don't know what the story is with Amazon and goods being sent from Grimbergen, Belgium, but I have had two orders of Wera and Wiha items being sent from there. The 1st order was delayed and then I got a refund without any word of why. The 2nd order was due on Thursday and is now delayed for a week to allow it until next Friday. That's the same timeframe as the earlier refunded order. So anyway, I'll have to look somewhere else for a couple of Torx bit sets.
 

Eighteen12

Forager
Feb 5, 2017
150
6
UK
From slot screws to star heads and then torx there's a great range of screws available. I decided to send off for a box of Spax torx and also their torx plus bits. They look the same as a standard torx with an additional stub at the tip. This mates into a recess on the screw head and helps keep the connection true. I tried a few 4x40's and 5x50's to see and they definitely grip and screw in well.

I first got interested in these torx when the Gedore Rotband-Plus hickory handles for my club hammers & axe came with this type of screw and it winched down really solid into the hard wood, feeling like a strong grip all the time.

While there is no name on the box, driver or bits, I would nearly say for sure that all these fittings are made by Wera. It's the exact same as their Rapidaptor bit holder and the box is the same too, except it's in a frog green colour rather than the usual Wera black.
 
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Eighteen12

Forager
Feb 5, 2017
150
6
UK
Back to my original idea for great old tools, I was tempted to buy a set of three Stanley Yankees on eBay recently. They were in an auction and went to full time with only my bid.

All were from a business clear-out and probably not used. None of them had any bits which might have put some bidders off? The prices being asked for some bits, especially the original Stanley Pozi ones in the plastic wrappers, are really high so that may well have been in my favour.

A good run with the Three-In-One oil, then cleaned off, and they're all working beautifully now with a strong spring to the actions. One has some rusty patches from storage and the other two are excellent. I've fitted 1/4" adaptors onto all of them now.
 

Eighteen12

Forager
Feb 5, 2017
150
6
UK
I had mentioned my notion of buying a router a while ago and, because it was only for light hobby finishing, I ended up getting the Dremel attachment and bit set. I used it a couple of times but, while it worked alright, it didn't impress me too much either. So the notion for a proper router stayed in my mind.

This week, I got a great sale deal on a Spyderco knife so that left me with the idea to buy my router now too. I'm heading away from the original idea of this thread, about enjoying using older tools over newer ones. I remember all too well that my old Makita router was an absolute dog to use for anything fine and detailed because it was so bulky and heavy. So I am looking at getting a 1/4" router in a small frame but still having good output power. Hopefully I'll snag one in the Black Friday ~ Christmas ~ New Year sales!
 

Eighteen12

Forager
Feb 5, 2017
150
6
UK
I found a nice Makita router. I was planning to get one of the green Bosch routers from Amazon's Black Friday deals but I see them both in other shops, and cheaper too, under sold out or clearance so they're obviously an older, unpopular or discontinued model. The Makita was just over forty pounds more than the Bosch but should be a much better tool. I've went for a couple of individual rounded nosing bits and a straight bevel bit rather than one of those larger sets, most of which I'd never use.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 14, 2008
5,238
1,009
Lancashire
Old tools are great until you need consumables. I've an old, donated hacksaw. I finally needed a new blade so got one thinking they were standard sizes. Mine turned out to be an old standard no longer used. Too short for 12" and bigger than the smaller blade lengths in the DIY stores.

If anyone knows where to get a hacksaw blade for something an inch perhaps inch and half shorter than the 12" / 300mm blades please let me know.

It's piece of turf's law that a rarely used tool needs a new blade just when you need it. Then you find your purchased blades don't fit and you can't get the right size. Cue purchase of new tool.
 

Snake

Maker
Jan 5, 2017
95
34
North Wilts
Old tools are great until you need consumables. I've an old, donated hacksaw. I finally needed a new blade so got one thinking they were standard sizes. Mine turned out to be an old standard no longer used. Too short for 12" and bigger than the smaller blade lengths in the DIY stores.

If anyone knows where to get a hacksaw blade for something an inch perhaps inch and half shorter than the 12" / 300mm blades please let me know.

It's piece of turf's law that a rarely used tool needs a new blade just when you need it. Then you find your purchased blades don't fit and you can't get the right size. Cue purchase of new tool.


have you got a pic of the hacksaw, alot of older ones, if the inline handle were made to take 3 different blade lengths, its difficult to explane, but if the spine looks to be sleeved, with out the blade in try to bend it back the wrong way and it should piviot, there are normally 3 notches on the back, just wiggle it untill the 12" notch lines up then lock it down in position again. hope this makes sense.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 14, 2008
5,238
1,009
Lancashire
It's a Chinese made one and possibly older than me (mid 40s-ish). If I understand right, you're saying the bow of the saw elongated to fit different sized blades. This one is a one piece bow part with thre handle fixed over one end. The blade is attached to a half inch long block of metal at each end which bolts into the bow. I did wonder if that could be changed somehow to fit the 12" blade but measuring the blades up they're too long for the bow.

I'll check it out again tonight but I'm sure I've not missed a way if making it fit. Annoying really. I did wonder why 12" is better than you're 10-11" blade this old saw is, why standardize on 12"?
 

Eighteen12

Forager
Feb 5, 2017
150
6
UK
A lot of the time designs are changed around simply to encourage sales. Either more power, some new feature or better ergonomics.

Sadly, one thing which usually changes with a newer model is the spares we need, like the blades you've just mentioned. My old Kress jigsaw runs like new (probably better than most new ones, I'll bet!) but I'm having to search the Internet now for good quality blades. Not one hardware shop I tried recently had a single blade left in stock.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 14, 2008
5,238
1,009
Lancashire
Took a second look and found a small partly unfurled end of bolt on the handle part at the top. I got it undone, pretty stiff, and the hacksaw became longer as mentioned above. Don't know why I didn't notice it before. I now have a functioning hacksaw. Just what I need for a job I have.
 

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