Long distance walk advice please

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chjo

Tenderfoot
Dec 6, 2009
67
0
cumbria
Hello all,doing a 44 mile sponsored walk in spring any1 got ant tips on how to avoid blisters and what footwear boots or trainers/approach shoes all advice welcome thanks.
 

Everything Mac

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nov 30, 2009
3,106
82
34
Scotland
get some decent boots now and wear them in.

go on a few short walks so you can identify any weak points in your feet. - by that I mean any areas on your feet which are prone to hot spots and or blisters. - getting blisters and letting them heal up toughens your feet up.

once you know where you are likely to get a hot spot you can tape it up, with zinc oxide tape or medical tape. that way you will be blister free.

as for boots well I bought a pair of lowas last year and I can't honestly say I'll be using another brand in the future.

All the best

Andy
 
Nov 29, 2004
7,808
10
Scotland
Hello all,doing a 44 mile sponsored walk in spring any1 got ant tips on how to avoid blisters and what footwear boots or trainers/approach shoes all advice welcome thanks.

Between now and the spring get out and about as much as you can, any footwear/sock combination that you can comfortably walk five miles in by March should be good for the fortyfour mile walk. Change your socks often and stop now and again to massage and dry out your feet. Good luck.

:)
 

chjo

Tenderfoot
Dec 6, 2009
67
0
cumbria
Thanks for all the replies,the terrain is footpaths, roads it's Keswick to Barrow seen some states the next day people not able to walk because of blisters etc,dont want to end up like that. What distance should i be walking in preparation?
 

Snowfire

Forager
Jan 10, 2010
109
0
Cotswolds
Can I suggest you also think about your knees and hips too. Some exercises to strengthen the muscles around these would be good.

Walking on roads pounds your heels and knees something rotten. A pair of well padded trainers would be my choice for the road sections as I find walking boots too jarring on tarmac. Depends if you can afford to carry two pairs of footwear.

:goodluck:
 

Bigfoot

Settler
Jul 10, 2010
669
4
Scotland
You will need to train for this to get your body (and feet) used to walking long distances. Get yourself into a regular walking routine of varying distances (this also lets you test footwear/sock combos) and set yourself a target of being able, approximately 3 weeks before the event, to complete 20 miles in a day, rest overnight and then do 20 miles the next day. That should set you up for the long haul when it comes.
 

chjo

Tenderfoot
Dec 6, 2009
67
0
cumbria
Thanks again i will be training i know of a lot of people dont and are in a state the next day/week,its quite sad watching the last ones hobble back.
 

nenook

Need to contact Admin...
Sep 24, 2010
130
0
stafford
hi prevention is always better than cure , tape your feet in prone areas if any develop, as stated walk as often as you can with a pack with gear in as you would on a walk , I had a pair af scarpa boots and within a week was on the hills , they are quite good boots, good luck with your walk

regards

Nenook
 

fred gordon

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 8, 2006
2,099
19
75
Aberdeenshire
Make sure you eat and drink plenty as well. An Army marches on its stomach! Have your gear packed properly and some good tunes on the MP3
 

red devil

Forager
Dec 1, 2010
114
0
South of Glasgow
I did Wainwright's Coast-to-Coast way back when I wasn't a lardy git, and made the fatal mistake of not wearing in my newish boots enough before I set off. I paid the price after day one - horrendous, bloody blisters.
Fortunately, I had a lightweight pair of Goretex boots in my pack which I wore for the remaining 10 days of the walk (I gritted my teeth and swore a lot, too).
So, huge tip here - wear your intended boots pretty much every day between now and your walk, and wear them on your training walks - heck, I'd even sleep in the damn things, just to be safe.
Smaller tip - if you do get blisters and you've nothing to treat them with, a bit of sheep's wool - just find some on a fence, it's everywhere in the Lakes - and stuff it between your blister and your sock. The lanolin in the wool helps your blisters heal... worked for me, anyway.
Training walks? I wouldn't overdo it. Pack in a few good ten-to-fifteen milers with some hills just to help on the cardio stuff (and with a moderately heavy pack, just to build up some hip and upper-thigh strength).
On the day, drink plenty and go for slow-burn foods (porridge to start, oaty flapjacks for snacks) not instant sugar-rush stuff like mint cake - you're doing an endurance event, not a sprint, and all that sudden rush-and-dip you'll get from sugar-rich foods will leave you feeling lousy.
Most of all, enjoy your challenge - even the bits when it hurts... just grit your teeth, set your sights on a target and keep pounding away.
best of luck!
Steve
 
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Graham_S

Squirrely!
Feb 27, 2005
4,016
39
48
Saudi Arabia
Make sure your feet stay dry.
It's when your feet are wet that the skin softens and blisters.
Avoid cotton socks like the plague, nylon too.
Thin wool or silk next to the skin works best for me, with a thicker pair over the top.
Light boots with a shock absorbing sole too.
Also have you considered walking poles?
I tried some out recently, walking up and down Vesuvius and was surprised at how much easier they made things.
 

m.durston

Full Member
Jun 15, 2005
378
0
43
st albans
to help toughen the soles of your feet up get yourself down the local chemists and get some surgical spirit.
daub it onto any areas of your feet which will rub ie soles, sides of toes , heel etc and it will help to form the necessary callousses to prevent blisters.
 

lostplanet

Full Member
Aug 18, 2005
1,977
171
51
Kent
Something you need to consider is if you will walk with any weight on your back, your feet will spread more than usual and could end up rubbing in the most comfortable of boots in areas like the smallest toe.
Work out what you will be walking with then build up back pack weight over a sensible period of time with your chosen boots and socks combo. When and if it starts getting too heavy carry water that can be ditched easily so you don't risk picking up an injury.

Get out and test, test, test your kit! remember the "7 P's"

This also allows your skin to get used to the backpack rubbing too.
44 miles is serious mileage, so I would do some more research on specialist walking and endurance websites.

You or your friend are bound to pick up a blister on route so this is good stuff to carry in case,
http://www.beunstoppable.co.uk/range/

Soon as you get a hotspot, stop and Follow the instructions to the letter and they will serve you well.

Good Luck and Well done for having a go!
 
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chjo

Tenderfoot
Dec 6, 2009
67
0
cumbria
food ,drinks and 1st aid are provided at various checkpoints be carrying only waterproofs and a few bits.The walk is done by hundreds and has been over subscribed the last few years,raises thousands for different causes in the area.
 

iotarho

Tenderfoot
Apr 1, 2009
57
0
31
Tunbridge Wells
A nifty little trick to soften the leather (if you choose that material for your boots), is to whack some saddle soap on them. Softens them up nicely for wearing in! But don't forget to put a bit of polish on 'em too.
 

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