Life Skills Class

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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,299
1,392
McBride, BC
It must look like a novelty to many city people.
However, the further north you go, the more practical that skill becomes.
Here, it's an after-school project and the kids are expected to help.
 
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santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,413
883
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Florida
It must look like a novelty to many city people.
However, the further north you go, the more practical that skill becomes.
Here, it's an after-school project and the kids are expected to help.
Once your see the Facebook pic, go ahead and click on it for the full article. Apparently they issue quite a few special hinting permits just for this purpose.
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
I did.
‘They plan to cook’ it says.

I hope they plans came to fruition. And some decent cook showed them to cook the various parts.
Different parts - different dishes.
You can make a fantastic stew/ goulash from the neck or rib meat.
An awesome Beef Wellington with the fillet.

I was lucky to be a member of a hunting group back in Heimat.

I wish I knew how to cook the feet back then.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,299
1,392
McBride, BC
There are only 2 parts to cooking what they butchered:
#1 = "Don't Burn It." Three very important words.
#2 = Start a digital cookbook of all your family favorites.
Might be hard to coax the goodies out of living relatives but impossible to learn after they tip over.

I'd be happy to buy a quarter of a beef or 1/2 a pig to move that project along.
Then we all have a feast.
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
In Europe we like to cook meat according to the toughness, fat content and connective tissue content.

Moose ( cow, horse, dog, goat) fillet cooks differently from the shank.
It took me several years to retrain my brain and adopt my cooking from the standard UK cuts to the standard US cuts. The process was quicker adopting from the Scandi cuts to the UK cuts.
Then came Picanha which we learnt only two years ago or so.

Another useful life skill, cooking well!

Many of today’s people do not have a clue about what the food starts as. Initiatives like this, or maybe even shown as an instructional video, are hugely important.
Learning to cook too.

Wonder how many of the members here are cooking several weekly meals from scratch?
I think statistics shown that around 30-40% of people do not, or something?
From scratch, so no tins or putting a ready meal in the micro.
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,299
1,392
McBride, BC
I hope the novelty of butchering game never wears thin on those kids. Practice makes perfect.
The fun bush-crafty part will be cooking over an open fire. My neighbor cooks over a fire pit
in his back yard in summer maybe 4 times per week. Petrol for tinder.

I cook just about everything from scratch, baking included, seven days a week.
Not rocket science. Lots of game like moose/elk/bear/venison/grouse/calamari/chicken/fish.

We all deserve top quality nutrition. That means mostly do-it-yourself.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,413
883
63
Florida
I doubt they’ll be cooking it for beer a fire (if I understood the article correctly) Everything was deboned and I believe it said it would be ground (minced) Probably what they don’t donate to charity will be cooked in a kitchen (possibly the school cafeteria) Meatloaf, spaghetti sauce, chili, meatballs, sloppy joes, whatever. Just another substitute for ground beef.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
That would be a pity, kind of.
But ground meat is a good way to start learning how to cook.

That is what was done in the Home Economics back in my days. Crepes. Minced meat dishes. Pasta.
The meatballs flew well. Peas too, through a straw.
Fun times!

I also agree, those kids are not yet at the ‘beer drinking age’. 13-14?
Maybe another year or two. I know you are a bit funny in the US about the drinking age.
You prefer your youth to do weed.
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,299
1,392
McBride, BC
Most sorts of wild game do not have much fat in the meat like beef.
Maybe you find 2g fat per 100g cooked meat.
Different business to cook bison, moose, elk and others when compared with beef (7g fat/100g cooked meat).
It's a distinction well worth learning to cope with. I have eaten 6-7 bison. Good practice.
 
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santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,413
883
63
Florida
Most sorts of wild game do not have much fat in the meat like beef.
Maybe you find 2g fat per 100g cooked meat.
Different business to cook bison, moose, elk and others when compared with beef (7g fat/100g cooked meat).
It's a distinction well worth learning to cope with. I have eaten 6-7 bison. Good practice.
We typically add either pork fat or beef suet back into ground venison. Not always, but frequently. Venison steaks are commonly pounded with a meat hammer, seasoned, dredged in seasoned flour, and fried (like country fried steak or shnitzel) I’m really not sure of the conventions are the same in Alaska though as it seems like beef suet and pork fat might be more expensive; and country fried steak is pretty much a southern thing. I’m imagining ground and used in something saucy like the dishes I first mentioned (all with a sauce or gravy to moisten)
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,299
1,392
McBride, BC
I confess to using marinades with olive oil for all game. Dice for kebabs and grill 4 mins each side medium by the clock.
I will chunk up a whole bison or venison or elk roast with a FLINT KNIFE for this = cut-it-with-a-fork-tender, every time.
Game cooking is just a little different than a fatty meat.
It's all outstanding food, even the pomegranate/citrus stuffing for the birds.

If I were suddenly moved to the UK, getting back to bird hunting would be #1 on my food list.
#2 would be those little deer-things = Muntjak?

2PM, I could have shot 4 mule deer from my bedroom window.
I didn't. Maybe I get lucky and they browse off all the grape vine that sticks through the fence.

Bison, cutting with flint edges.

Meat Cuts.JPG