Jungle training recomendations

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wolf man

Forager
Sep 12, 2005
234
0
52
Oxford
Hi guys

need some advice; my partner and I would like to do a Jungle training trip next year. The problem is that not sure who offers the best courses.

Do you have any suggestions as to who to go with and where. Mr Mears courses are out of my pocket range, and i;m sure that i would be paying for the name primarily.
Any help would be greatly appreciated :You_Rock_

Cheers
WM
 

BOD

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
wolf man said:
Hi guys

need some advice; my partner and I would like to do a Jungle training trip next year. The problem is that not sure who offers the best courses.

Do you have any suggestions as to who to go with and where. Mr Mears courses are out of my pocket range, and i;m sure that i would be paying for the name primarily.
Any help would be greatly appreciated :You_Rock_

Cheers
WM
Try Bushcraft Expeditions. http://www.bushcraftexpeditions.com/

Good reputation and good instruction
 

BOD

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Wayne said:
Bod do you know of any local companies worth a look at?

I have a friend wanting to go wildlife watching in your neighbourhood next year.
Are you looking for guides or looking for local jungle bushcraft courses?

Assuming it is guides you want, our company have used a couple of guides for several years who are relaible and speak good English.

However he may not need a proper jungle guide if all he wants to do is see elephants, orangutans, proboscis monkeys and the like as there many tour companies that do trips to places where these can usually be seen. Sandakan and the Lower Kinabatangan river in Sabah are good for those animals I meationed. A Lonely Planet guide can help him select companies.

If you want to find rhinoceros and clouded leopard then that is a different story and no one can guarantee sightings and don't believe anyone who says they can find them.
 

Wayne

BCUK Welfare Officer
Mod
Dec 7, 2003
3,460
320
48
West Sussex
www.forestknights.co.uk
Cheers Bod. i think he and his wife are planning to see the usual tourist areas. I prefer to use local guids where possible rather than big tour companies to ensure my money helps the local enconomy.
 

BOD

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Trip going out in Dec.06 Amazon jungle.
http://jungletraining.com/
No reflection on you personally , (I'm sure you were only intending to help) but I must say I am not impressed by the Randall (RAT) site.

AK 47s, chest rigs, silly Rambo knives(as opposed to machetes), masked men and the carving up of a crocodile. Seems more like playing at being some nasty CIA -sponsored paramilitary death squad goon than proper indigenous bushcraft.

Go with the BCUK list of schools mentioned and you won't go wrong
 

crazydave

Settler
Aug 25, 2006
858
1
50
Gloucester
most of the basic training you can practise at home ie.. hammocks, basha's kit packing and firelighting etc... its more military advice but its valid wherever.

I'm assuming rainforest not savannah so here's some of what I remember from my jungly training :)

learn the two kit method of one wet one dry set. you will always be wet either from water or sweat.

look at a machete or kukri as your primary addition to your multitool and sheath knife. you can also buy a local made blade then bring it back as a souvenir.

keep your valuables/wallet/passport etc.. in a waterproof box

you can firesteel it but always have a waterproof supply of matches - swan vestas in a ziploc bag in your back pocket or several lighters - get used to working with damp wood and wet ground. never go anywhere without fire, a blade and preferably your survival kit. no cooking fuel will be required but fire starting kit yes.

the jungle will aways be damp and riddled with bugs so learn how to keep you kit off the ground and always check for nasties in the morning

drybags are a must as are ziplocs they keep the bugs out as well.

everything in the jungle is out to get you - spiders, ants, blow flies, centipedes, leeches, snakes etc.. even some of the plants so be wary and use your eyes. every cut can kill you so loads of iodine, first aid kit and training. clear the floor and check for nests before resting or setting up camp.

take a sleeping bag as it also gets cold

led torches and a spare as the jungle gets very dark very quickly

m65 style trousers are good and learn to pack them properly if your tools and kits interfere with your hip belt then put stuff on your hip belt and the rest in the bellows pockets and on lanyards. military kit is designed for this and cheap so dont be worried about looking like a vietnam vet as even ray wears and uses it if you dont like olive drap then buy the desert kit. jungle boots are for just that your feet will stay wet all day knee high goretex socks might help but get used to doing without.

http://www.usrsog.org/ - these guys do a good trouser pack list - remember you aren't likely to be wearing a shirt.

buy a decent water filter and find a water puritab whose taste you can tollerate you will most likely be following river courses so water wont be an issue so squashy bottles in the bergan but at least 2liters of belt kit.

food is likely to be rice/pasta and whatever you can find to go with it - a few soups and pasta sauces will make a welcome addition to the menu. the locals have acclimatised stomachs but you cant drink the water or even eat the fruit unless its well wrapped as it can give you dysentery.

buddy up and check each other all the time - keep your pants on when washing unless the locals say its safe and never pee into any water alway do it into the forest.

athletes foot and crotch rot will pop up so decent socks, lycra pants and a dosing of iodine, canasten and foot powder around both areas at night will help.

plenty of salt tablets along with your paludrine - I'd also pack vitamins and take garlic pills the smelly breath type are best as they make your blood a repellant to blood suckers - they can smell it so leave you alone.

never pick the leeches off - a cig end/lighter/match.hot stick or insect repellant will get them off.

no deoderant as it attracts the bugs and you need to sweat so leave the sure at home - simple soap or mountain suds for everything. try not to wet shave as the cuts soon turn septic

make sure you have a welcome bag at the other end so you can pamper your self back to life - a 5 day antibiotic course will help ensure you dont bring any nasties back - watch for strange lumps and bites though and read up on blow flies or the human botfly both of which lay their eggs in old bite or wounds, the maggot eats its way out. there's also a nasty little spider which bits your toes then lays its eggs under your nail.

anyway enough doom and gloom - I hope you have fun :)
 
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crazydave

Settler
Aug 25, 2006
858
1
50
Gloucester
a bit more - :)

learn to pack a comfortable waterproof floatable rucsac - see if the local pool will let you swim in clothing and get some practise in using your rucsak as a float - lido's are pretty lexible about these things as they have better filters. or take a local river and try it live but wear a wetsuit in the UK

emergency wise a 25m roll of dyneema or good quality webbing strap each is ideal for river crossing as its light and more importantly packs small - half a dozen caribiners will help you do most things. climbing accessory loops can make emergency climbing harnesses, hold you kit off the ground and make top body rigs for river crossings.

night foot wear is an issue as people take sandals but they leave the foot very open - something like the adidas water moccasin would be a good idea but get use to wearing the same kit from light till dark then the dry stuff is your pyjamas for the night, as soon as you get up then its on with the wet stuff again.

with jungle you are less bothered about the enviromental impact of swinging your machete as it grows so damn fast but learn which plants might hurt you as some have burning sap - get the guide to show you the water vines and half a dozen common edible plants like palm hearts.

when away from each other learn to do the jungle whoop so you can keep in touch - every few minutes you sound off or reply to another one - it keeps you orientated and helps you find your way back to base camp from the lavvy. you can practise this by wearing blindfolds on a footy pitch and calling each other till you meet, see how frequently you start whooping and you'll get the idea - you can get lost 10 foot away from your camp if you're not carefull.

Blokes have it easy but females have to be extra vigilant when caught short so sweeping the ground clear before any action is essential. troops used to carry a half litre wide necked pop bottle so they didn't have to wander in the night (a half litre is approx a bladder full - some used a normal water bottle and made sure it was sterilised and rinsed before potable use). its better to go in the morning before you move off as you are least liable to get curious animals digging it up and having a rummage never go in the dark incase you get lost or get bitten by a crawly thing/snake/leopard etc.. for that I've seen guys go in a mess tin then bury it in the morning.

everything thing sounds big and scary in the dark :)

never ever in anything rely on just gps navigate by terrain.