I am amazed…..

  • UPDATE - The main upgrade is now finished. The site should now be functioning as normal, I will be making tweaks over the weekend, particularly to look of the site. If you notice something is broken or have any comments please let me know. Many thanks Matt (Lithril)

Steve R

Forager
Jan 29, 2007
177
1
66
Lincolnshire UK
Already bought the water bottles some time back woodwalker, bought them so I could carry water when I go hunting for fossils, another new activity, thanks for the tips though.

Came into a little money today so bought,

Camp kettle set including meths burner £19.99.....Millets, (aluminium, quite light)

Firesteel £11.99......Millets.

Folding saw £6.99......B&Q


:D :D :D
 

Greg

Full Member
Jul 16, 2006
3,524
32
Pembrokeshire
Steve one tip that I would like to give you is stay out of Millets!
Their kit is overpriced and the staff know jack about the outdoors!
Take the advice of the guys on here who have been there, used the kit worn the T-shirts and made the videos and then go from there.
You can buy most of the core equipment in army surplus stores alot cheaper than any Outdoors shops and from experience you can sometimes hagle with the shop keeper over prices!

I have only recently became interested in Bushcraft and am going on my first meet next w/end but I have played in the outdoors most of my life and have never bought any of the brand name gear and got along fine.

So good luck in the future mate, stay safe and most of all enjoy the experiences you'll have!
 

Steve R

Forager
Jan 29, 2007
177
1
66
Lincolnshire UK
Oh dear, looks like I have spent more than I needed to. Problem is, I have seen several bargains online but cant get them with me having no debit/credit card or bank account.

The only person I know with a debit card is my daughter, and most places dont take her card (Solo).

I looked into postal orders, but with many things, by the time I have paid the fee's I would have paid store prices, if not more.

Not many places within a reasonable drive of me to buy from, if I go further afield, the fuel prices add up to make any savings negligable.


Ah well. thats life I guess.

Thanks for all the advice folks.
 

Celtic Dragon

New Member
Aug 4, 2003
365
0
43
Hatfield, Herts
Steve, solo is more widlely accepted than most people realise. Its only a card number how the banks handle it is the same for switch (now meastro) etc, I know its my job.

Also paypal do accept solo cards so that opens up group buys etc to you with your daughters consent.

Things aint as gloomy as you think, I know cos I too have a solo card.
 

BushTucker

New Member
Feb 3, 2007
556
0
56
Weymouth
I have used a tarp i got from b&q for ages, until i got my basha, it cost £4 and is 3m x 4m, nasty blue thing but cant tell in the dark,lol
 

leon-1

Mod
Mod
Steve so far I have seen no mention of what you are carrying the motherload of kit in.

Have a look online for a Swedish Army LK35, it's the Swedish Armies Daysack, it should cost no more than £10. They are a good little pack that won't break the bank and do everything that is needed of them.

Stoves you could of saved money on by making your own, I am sure if you had asked someone would of been more than willing to give you links to coke can stoves or zen stoves.
 

Morrius

Member
Oct 16, 2006
17
0
36
Bristol
I think scouring the web or shops for bargains is an enjoyable part of outdoors activities. You quickly learn what is and isn't necessary. Likewise, plenty of kit can be obtained with the old 'beg, build and borrow' approach I like to use.

I've found it handy to buy cheaper equipment to get to grips with, find out what I would improve/keep and then buy something more expensive when I'm comfortable that its A) necessary and B) not going to be destroyed my my own misuse. I would tailor your trips to the equipment you have at first, rather than attempting something that requires masses of gear. If you have a bushcraft friend, or someone you can potentially convince to try it out, you two can plan trips together and share equipment where it is safe/appropriate to do so. For instance, you don't really need two billy cans between two people, but you're not going to want to share a knife all weekend.

The most important aspect is your safety, but don't shoot too high if it means you're going to have to remortgage the house to get the necessary gear! Besides, building gear slowly over time will allow you to get to grips with each piece of kit instead of being overwhelmed by it all.

Practical tips would include using a builders tarp, scouring army surplus shops and websites and avoiding anything where you pay through the nose for the brandname. I recently bought a North Face bag on ebay to use as a day sack and also to take my lunch, gym gear to work in etc. I paid around £35 with postage for it. It's just about worth that amount of money, sturdily built, holds a decent amount, is comfy etc and looks good when out and about, if you deem that important. However, these bags go for £75-£80 normally! Quite literally you could buy two army surplus bags for this with change, so it pays to shop around. I'm probably preaching to the choir here, but thought you might find this story amusing at least.

One thing is for sure, if you're looking for any advice on equipment, you're in the right place! Some of the guys on here have liquid knowledge leaking from every orifice. :lmao:
 

BushTucker

New Member
Feb 3, 2007
556
0
56
Weymouth
Sounds stupid but i actually started out with the old canvas style rucksack, it was probably onlt 15-20litres capacity but after some sow work, had loads of outside carry space. Those were the days when we made our kit or improoved on something.

I have now been using a Forces 88 litre burgen, great sack for all your bits.
 

Greg

Full Member
Jul 16, 2006
3,524
32
Pembrokeshire
Fishing accessories on E***bay, rucksack with loads of pouches good enough to get started £19.99.
Self inflating airbed (similar to thermarest) Argos 14.99.
Frost mora Knife less than a tenner.
Just look around mate loads of bargains out there.
Look at the stove 'Wayland'(member) made from a cutlery stand from ikea.
Simple yet brilliant and cost him just over £2, and you probably have already got one!
 

Steve R

Forager
Jan 29, 2007
177
1
66
Lincolnshire UK
Thanks for the replies and advice folks.

Rucksack,

I already had two, one smaller than the other, I figured I could use them as appropriate, both are the sort that are available anywhere, red and blue for example. They seem to be strong enough for starter packs.

Stove,

The stove more or less came the pan set I bought, this one, Cookset , I was looking at the set because it seemed to be versatile, can take the lot in a camp situation, or just some if doing a lot of moving around, I figured I could add some wire from coat hangers to the pans to be able to hang them from a tripod. The first set I looked at was same set, same price but no stove.

Can even just take the stove, some fuel (meths) and my tin mug on my belt kit, (I prefer belt kit) .

Axe,

I bought an axe yesterday from a local hardware store £7.50, has a reasonable profile, judging by what I have read and pics seen here, I can practice my sharpening (which I am rubbish at) on it. I don’t think I will lose it either, it has a bright yellow plastic handle :D , but it will do for now.


Still have to get a knife but I figure my Victorinox will do until I can get access to one, seen them all over the web at reasonable price (Frost).

I actually fancy the Frost, intend to make a leather sheath for it when I get one and will probably stick with it, from what I have read about them here.


Thanks for all the good advise and tips :You_Rock_