How to move....!?

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TheViking

Native
Jun 3, 2004
1,864
2
32
.
Hey

How do you move silently in the woods? If you does things like that.... :wink: I mean stalking and things like that.... :!: :idea:
I called a popular soldier from the DK Huntercorp, and asked him what the basics was, when moving silently and unseen! :arrow:
He told me some basic principles: Movement, Vegetation, Light and Background.

But, if you have a tip to share, post it! :wink: :-D
 

Stuart

Full Member
Sep 12, 2003
4,141
47
**********************
Basic stalking relys on the S's

shape, shine, shadow, Silhouette, sound, sudden movement

remove all these things and you will genrally go unnoticed

there are many different types of walks and crawls taught and described for stalking but I belive that its best to use what ever movment works best for you

for example many people teach the fox walk where you life you leg high and carfully place the ball of your foot on the ground and then the heel

however when watching Iban tribsmen (borneo) i noticed that they stalk by putting there leg out low and stright with the heel touching the ground first then transfuring the weight to the heel before bringing the ball of the foot in contact with the ground, a method that i prefure

this probably does not make any sense described here but the message is dont feel that you have to move in a particular way because that is how somone taught you

just stay low and move slow
 

Kath

Native
Feb 13, 2004
1,397
0
I've learned that if you're trying to be quiet, you probably aren't making as much noise as you think you are. Breathing etc can't be heard very far away, so relax and try to breathe normally.

Since Adi007 got the night-vision scope for his birthday, we've been playing a lot of hide-and-seek type games and they're really good for teaching the kids to be still and to move quietly. Despite being so light in comparison to adults, kids find it incredibly hard to walk quietly. The key is to get them to slow their movements right down and to 'feel around' for twigs etc that will make a noise, before they put their feet down. This really helps because they start to think in advance what noise something will make so they can avoid it. They've also done stuff like changing the zipper tags on their clothes, so that they don't make as much noise. It all helps!

Of course, finding the little blighters is the problem now ... :lol:
 

RovingArcher

Need to contact Admin...
Jun 27, 2004
1,069
1
Monterey Peninsula, Ca., USA
I was taught stalking by an old bowhunter that said, if you want to learn to move quietly in a forest, you must believe that you can become part of the forest. Meaning, look like part of the tree when you're standing still and if you make noise when moving, make it sound like part of the natural sounds of the area.

Also, it helps in the beginning to remove your shoes and socks. It teaches you to slow way down and feel with your eyes and then your tender feet, before putting the foot down. Whether or not you place your heal or ball down first probably doesn't matter, except for balance, but the principle of each is to put as little foot on the ground as possible until your weight is shifted and settled.

Sometimes it's an advantage to make noise in a noisy woods. If you sit quietly and listen to the critters that live there, they can be quite noisy as they go about their daily activities. Mimmicking those sounds will sometimes aid your stealth. Just knowing when and when not to make noise, move, etc., is most of what you'll need to learn.

Moving when you can see the eyes of your intended prey or a human is a dead bust. Most animals and humans zoom right in on even the slightest movement. Breathing into the belly instead of the chest will help to quiet you and even though breathing may not carry very far for humans to hear, a deer will hear your breath from a 100 meters or better. Never make eye contact, because once you do, it's all over. Cover your hands and the shine on your face. They are what will be seen first. Camo isn't always necessary, if the clothing you wear blends with the coloration of the surroundings (human) and breaks up your outline (animal). If you are stalking animals, your scent will give you away. Not only is it carried on the winds, but thermals come into play as well. Meaning, early, when it cool and the sun isn't full up, the thermals will drift down, but when the air temperature starts to warm, the thermals start to move upwards.

Humans are fairly easy to stalk up on, animals can be a real challenge, especially deer and other large game. I used to take a camera with me when I practiced and would sneak up as close as I could on rabbits and other small game to learn the art of stalking. Got some really nice photos too.
 
J

JeremyH

Guest
Interesting remarks.
Alot of this depends upon how 'intune' one is with the nature.
If one 'lives' in a particular place one will move with that place. Being aware means more than foot movement, breathing, camo etc. It is about being part of what is already there. Being non threatening, finding 'stillness'.
A good book on this is by Joseph Cornell - Listening to Nature - can be construed to be a bit 'hippy' but very enlightening.
Here on Islay we often manage to get within metres of deer, birds, otters. Just wearing our usual ranger work wear.
This morning, 0430hrs, we had twleve Red Deer pass within ten metres of us on an open hill path on the Rhinns! That is breath taking!
Practice and be - suddenly if you are easy in the landscape it happens!

Jeremyh :-D
 

Viking

Settler
Oct 1, 2003
961
1
45
Sweden
www.nordicbushcraft.com
Pretend that you are walking barefoot on glass. Put down your feet slowly, stop listen, next step slowly, stop listen and so on...

It work pretty well, it´s when you move that you are visible, not when you are standing still.
 

den

Nomad
Jun 13, 2004
295
1
45
Bristol
Take your time when approaching. It’s not just looking around your feet for things that make a noise. Look far in front, plan your route. Look for the clearest noise free route, but using as much cover or dead ground as you can. If you are seen it’s over. If what ever you are watching becomes a bit suspicious, just stay still where you are and you might just get away with it. The more you do it and the more you mess up the better you get.

:p
 

TheViking

Native
Jun 3, 2004
1,864
2
32
.
When not in the woods, I normally stalk my dog. It's a 4 year old Border Collie with a very good nose and ears!! ;) :cool:
Very difficult sometimes.... A dog is very good to 'practice at/with'! But of course the dog can't know that you're stalking it!
Remember: a person who is absolutely unmoving, is rare to be seen! ;)
(Baden powells advice....)
Although this works best with animals, and NOT my dog.... :p :p :cool:
 

Quill

Need to contact Admin...
Jun 29, 2004
80
0
Wisconsin
I like to take a couple of days if possible and get civilization out of my system. This slows down my pace, clears my ears, nose and eyes. Of course I have already scouted game trails way before. I also sit for long periods of time scanning with field glasses. We live in a fast pace society which carries over to hunting. This is bad. It only works in a group drive hunt. Natives use to prepare themselves for a major hunt. The sweat lodge would purify you, change your scent and get you psyced up up for the hunt.
 

Roving Rich

Full Member
Oct 13, 2003
1,460
4
Nr Reading
Well credit where its due, Feathers from Wild-life survival taught me to stalk.
He uses the Tom Brown junior "fox walk". - Put your big toe down first, then roll the rest of your toes down, ball of foot then eventually heal. The steps get slower and slower the closer you get to the Animal. It should take 2 minutes per step :shock: when you are getting close (try it its bloomin hard to move that slow). You also crouch down to break up your shape.
During his demo Feathers makes you walk around as you would normally but with your hands over your ears. Then fox walk doing the same. The difference is incredible. The first sounded like i was beating a bass drum with every step. And that sound resounds through the ground with every heal strike and scares every critter living on or near the ground.
I picked up the nickname "stalking Bunny" a few weeks back, when i left the fireside and stalked off into the undergrowth having seen something out of the corner of my eye. Five minutes later i having circled around, I slowly crouched down and picked up the bunny I'd spotted grazing in the scrub. It squealed and squirmed in my hands as I received a round of applause from the fireside audience :lol:
Cheers
Rich
 

leon-1

Full Member
I don't think that there is any specific way to stalk, but I tend to roll from the outside of my foot most of the time and this will change depending on the terrian, undergrowth, deadfall and leaf litter that covers the ground.

You tend to find that in part you will end up using bits from all of the previous posts, but will use one specific method for the majority of time, that you are more comfortable with and that other factors also have great influence on how you move including quarry and terrain. :-D
 

Rhoda

Nomad
May 2, 2004
371
0
43
Cornwall
www.worldwild.co.uk
Getting civilisation out of your system is definately the way to start. Take time to sit in the environment and tune into your surroundings. When you are truly aware you will notice how sharp your senses become and you will start to notice even the tiny things around you. I find that even colours become brighter and I start to notice new smells, quite amazing really. Once you are fully aware and in tune then start to practise moving silently. It takes strong legs and good balance to use the fox and weasel walks effectively. If you do make a noise stay absolutely still. A noise in the woods is like a stone dropped into water, this is the theory of concentric rings. If you make a noise whatever is closest to you will hear it and make noise itself, this is usually a bird warning others of your presence. The message is passed on throughout the surrounding area. If you have not blown it completely and the animal you are stalking is still there you must wait for the concentric rings to fade away before resuming movement.
The more comfortable you can get with being barefoot the better. You can then use the soles of your feet to feel for twigs, leaves etc and keep your eyes on whatever you are following. Its really hard to stalk in boots!!!

Rich is right, Feathers from Wild Life is excellent at moving silently, a quick demo from him shows exactly how it should be done!
 

Kath

Native
Feb 13, 2004
1,397
0
Had a good practice of fox walking this evening when we were out geocaching in a woodland on the mainland. All of us were taking turns to take a step as quietly as possible - took us about ten minutes for us all to get down a short slope and must have looked very strange to the passers-by but who cares, eh? :?:

We did keep our shoes on though as there was a lot of 'animal sign' around. :roll: :yuck:
 

James Watson

Tenderfoot
Jul 30, 2004
84
0
43
Salisbury
www.nativeawareness.co.uk
Hi Guys.

I don't want to be picky but fox walking isn't stalking, its walking. The two minute stalk thats been talked about is Tom Browns Standard Stalk, which he teaches in his standard class. In his Advanced class he teaches, "Advanced stalking".Which is Water stalk, up hill, down hill, acrosss hill, on snow, ice, floor boards, in shoes, running, leaf litter, rock, crawling etc. In his Expert classes he teaches "expert stalking" :yikes: which is well, amazing. His instructor Ruth Ann, taught me... you should see her do the expert crawl. Awesome.

I love stalking. I'm practicing water stalking at the moment. Well not whilst typing this.. you Know what i mean. :p It's really difficult to not produce any concentric rings, water droplets or soil plumes. It's possible though, I've seen it done.

James
 

Rhoda

Nomad
May 2, 2004
371
0
43
Cornwall
www.worldwild.co.uk
No offence intended at all but Tom Brown is not the be all and end all of tracking. I appreciate he is a very good tracker and teacher as are his instructors but his terms for things are not set in stone, nor are they necessarily recognised by other trackers who may have come from different backgrounds. Many trackers talk about fox walking and stalking as similar things, although I admit some of the terms originate from Tom Brown. What we are trying to do is give people with little or no experience of moving silently the basic idea, call it what you want the aim is the same - try not to be heard!! I sometimes think that people get very caught up with one teachers way of doing things, and forget that there are many other equally talented trackers and many approaches to the art from many different parts of the world. I personally am constantly learning from different people and find it limiting to stick one.
 

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