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fingertrouble

Tenderfoot
Sep 6, 2021
64
43
48
London, UK
I'm Tim from London...I am here to get some advice about some of my old gear (like my ancient Berghaus AB backpack I got off Freegle; having fun trying to clean it because some cheese decided to separate and leak over it and that's going rancid! Washing it in the washing machine in an old pillow case didn't work; trying again with liquid flakes) - yes I have some Fabsil to reproof it.

I have done some outdoor activity; mostly walking and camping but not as hardcore as some - just come from a couple of weeks working holiday camping along the Jurassic coast, my work being as an artist - I paint and draw.

I want to do more trips like this - but more on the cheap as a poor artist (wildcamping, etc). I have camped in Scotland (during the midge season which was supposed to be over!) and done the 'black house' hostels and walking, and visited the islands a long time ago. But going 'off grid' means more weight, more gear (carrying more water, food, cooking gear etc) which paradoxically means I can't walk as far.

During my recent trip I had issues with my old Vango self-inflating mat which was obviously punctured; wish I was the sort that could just sleep on hard ground but no, too old for that...so looking for lightweight solutions for a inflatable mat that doesn't cost the earth or weigh too much...also ecology and sustainability is a big thing with me, so like to find cheap/free ways to do stuff - so much gear is plastic and throwaway, it's depressing. I like using stuff for years - my tent must be at least 10+ years old!
 
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Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
5,224
4,565
Mid Wales
Welcome to the forum Tim

Too old? you're only a youngster; so is your tent :)

There was a thread a couple of weeks ago that discussed sleep mats - it may be worth you finding that though I'm not sure it came to any conclusion!
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,094
1,213
Berlin
Welcome to the forum!

If you want to buy long lasting equipment you should choose military surplus in the best available conditions. Most of the stuff one can even buy factory new, what usually is also a very good deal.

Try to clean your rucksack by hand in the bath tub with hand warm water a classical nail brush (wood / natural fibres) and dish detergent and rinse it excessively afterwards.
 
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fingertrouble

Tenderfoot
Sep 6, 2021
64
43
48
London, UK
Welcome to the forum!

If you want to buy long lasting equipment you should choose military surplus in the best available conditions. Most of the stuff one can even buy factory new, what usually is also a very good deal.

Try to clean your rucksack by hand in the bath tub with hand warm water a classical nail brush (wood / natural fibres) and dish detergent and rinse it excessively afterwards.
Yes that's what I used to do - before the Berghaus AB (which I think is what military sometimes used? Although it's not a system pack so maybe not that specific one, it's olive green so very army 'like') I had - and still have but it's rather wrecked now, a large old-type British army surplus pack, and the day/side packs - still have those, very useful!

I find army surplus gear lasts, although it can be heavier....looking at British Army/Dutch self-inflating mats atm.
 
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Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
36,774
2,678
S. Lanarkshire
If you ache at all, and you want a warm, comfortable sleep, it's worth it, it really is.
Folks spend that on a pair of boots, a knife, a jacket, a rucksack, but won't spend it for a decent night's sleep.

Oh, and welcome to the forum :)
 

fingertrouble

Tenderfoot
Sep 6, 2021
64
43
48
London, UK
If you ache at all, and you want a warm, comfortable sleep, it's worth it, it really is.
Folks spend that on a pair of boots, a knife, a jacket, a rucksack, but won't spend it for a decent night's sleep.

Oh, and welcome to the forum :)
I am going through the old? ultralight/mat/gear threads, and it's a little less 'should I spend that money?' and more 'I don't have that money'. Scary prices. I have never spent that money on boots, jacket or a rucksack in my life (hence the free rucksack via Freegle). Ultralight Capes and ultralight tents sound amazing, but frankly I don't have £200-300 to spend, if I did to be brutally frank I'd not be camping, I'd be staying in a nice B&B or hotel!

Camping for me is less 'back to nature' - not that fond of creepy crawlies tbh - and more 'what I can afford', although instant access to the views I want to paint and draw was great (but people would kvetch at the art gear weight, not much I can do about that, ultralight art gear is not a thing - but I'd rather not have extra clothes or eat as much than skip those, hence why I took no spare clothes - I smelt rather even with showers, but hey, I have to make compromises for my art!).
 
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Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
36,774
2,678
S. Lanarkshire
I am going through the old? ultralight/mat/gear threads, and it's a little less 'should I spend that money?' and more 'I don't have that money'. Scary prices. I have never spent that money on boots, jacket or a rucksack in my life (hence the free rucksack via Freegle). Ultralight Capes and ultralight tents sound amazing, but frankly I don't have £200-300 to spend, if I did to be brutally frank I'd not be camping, I'd be staying in a nice B&B or hotel!

Camping for me is less 'back to nature' - not that fond of creepy crawlies tbh - and more 'what I can afford', although instant access to the views I want to paint and draw was great (but people would kvetch at the art gear weight, not much I can do about that, ultralight art gear is not a thing - but I'd rather not have extra clothes or eat as much than skip those, hence why I took no spare clothes - I smelt rather even with showers, but hey, I have to make compromises for my art!).

We all make compromises :) one way or t'other.

If you need a mat, then have a look at making one out of ripstop nylon, it's made like a series of tubes. Every night you blow up those long thin modelling balloons and put them into those tubes.
It's comfortable, warm, light weight, packs down to almost nothing....and if you use the stuff and balloons from the poundstore, it'll only cost you a few quid.
Folks like the lightweight fellrunners do that. It works, not as well as an exped down mat, but it works.

My down mat is still sound after years, and a lot of use. It wasn't cheap but it's a good night's sleep and a blooming sight cheaper in the long run than if I'd B&B's all those nights out.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,094
1,213
Berlin
Some of the best equipment in the world is offered for very low prices.
For example the Opinel No8 Carbone or the rain poncho of the German army, used military field bottles and mugs or whatever. Military equipment is often heavier than civil equipment but usually lasts a lifetime. And a light rucksack depends mainly on the short packing list and less on the weight of every single item.

Nowadays people tend to put a lot of nonsense into their rucksacks, just because it's sold somewhere.
 
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fingertrouble

Tenderfoot
Sep 6, 2021
64
43
48
London, UK
Some of the best equipment in the world is offered for very low prices.
For example the Opinel No8 Carbone or the rain poncho of the German army, used military field bottles and mugs or whatever. Military equipment is often heavier than civil equipment but usually lasts a lifetime. And a light rucksack depends mainly on the short packing list and less on the weight of every single item.

Nowadays people tend to put a lot of nonsense into their rucksacks, just because it's sold somewhere.
Agreed. I saw this list on an old thread: https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/the-15lb-base-weight-gear-list-i1401

And I was like - why so much duplication? A bowl AND mess tins? 3 water bottles? 2 headlamps? A sit mat AND a pillow (you can use one for both...shock horror!). 2 flints? Eh?

And I have an easy way to cut down on gear for blokes...stop shaving ;-)
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,094
1,213
Berlin
That weight can also be achieved with a bit less investment.

BW stands for Bundeswehr, the German army. The military equipment will surely last a lifetime in civil use if bought new, new old stock or in the best available conditions.

Lightweight Milsurp

Packing List


Rucksack BW Jägerrucksack Cordura 820 g
Sleep mat BW folding mat 430g
Sleeping bag Carinthia Tropen 1100g
in the
Bivvy bag British army 800g
Poncho BW 1000g
Cordage 2x 2 metres to tension it as shelter 30g

Dry bag (as pillow too) 70g
containing
Fleece Jacket 450g
Spare underwear 1X Briefs and T-shirt 200g
Spare socks 1X 70g
Swimming briefs 1X 60g

Toilet paper 60g
Wash kit 160g
(tooth brush, tooth cream, soap in a box, razor, small towel)

Food (Bread, Salami, hard cheese, nuts, chocolate)
in the
Mess kit BW 450g
Spoon stainless steel 50g
Candle 30g
Bic lighter 20g

Rucksack in total 5800 g



ON THE MAN:

Shoes
Socks

Underwear
Shorts or trousers
Cotton Handkerchief

Several times folded usable as pot holder and pre filter before water purification by boiling.
Purse
House
keys
Matches or Bic lighter
Belt
Knife
(Victorinox Compact or Climber)
Field bottle with mug and belt pouch
(or 2x plastic bottles from the supermarket in the rucksack)

T-shirt
Shirt
(Buttoned long sleeved shirt, ideal with two pockets and flaps over it.)
Compass
Topographical
map
1:50 000

I really ask myself why the beginners in the "ultralight" trekking community don't simply ask the own grandfather how to pack a light rucksack.
 
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Hultafors Outdoor knife for Sale

We have a a number of Hultafors Outdoor Knives with Firesteels for sale.

You can see more details here in this thread OUTDOOR KNIVES The price is £27 posted to the UK. Pay via the paypal button below.