duke of edinburgh award

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is duke of edinburgh a good experience?

  • yes

    Votes: 37 94.9%
  • no

    Votes: 2 5.1%

  • Total voters
    39

jack29g

Forager
Sep 17, 2004
164
0
Leicester
as i like bushcraft and outdoor activities i decided to do the duke of edinburgh award because i wanted to enhance my skills. Wanted to know if anyone else has done it or is doing it because at the moment it's a waste of time. I know more about maps than the qulified leader (and i'm no expert), we have to do risk assessments on everything (went on night walk, before we started had 1/2 talk about dangers like "might slip on styles"). We also had to buy these tiny little booklets for £10.50 which was atotal rip off and the whole system is just a bit rubbishy. Just wanted to hear your experiences of it.
 

redflex

Need to contact Admin...
I never did the DofE it was felt I was not a outdoor type so my brother went instead. :confused:

Now he never been camping since and he likes towns works in IT and not a big fan of the great outdoors.

Me well I ended up camping in rain forests, working in the forestry and have been a countryside ranger.

So to those who did the select I think they did a great job :twak:
 

tomtom

Full Member
Dec 9, 2003
4,283
5
35
Sunny South Devon
i never finnished my DofE as i was trying to do a kayaking expedition and on 2 of us on the team managed to get the 2star level needed for insurence.. so i did ten tors instread.. but doing my service and skill and what not was good and i would advise it :cool:
 

Biddlesby

Settler
May 16, 2005
972
4
Frankfurt
I am doing DofE gold at the moment. I wouldn't say somebody who is a bushcraft fanatic would learn all that much, but it's experiences that matter. Still, somebody with the right motivation could do it all for much cheaper, and without the fustrutation of endless planning sessions and risk assesments. I'm mainly doing it for UCAS, though.
 

Lithril

Administrator
Admin
Jan 23, 2004
2,576
49
Southampton, UK
I teach DoE at two different schools and support it whole heartedly. The difference in some of the kids, especially those who don't have much experience outside of their living rooms or the towns at the most, is quite astounding.
 

Doc

Need to contact Admin...
Nov 29, 2003
2,109
10
Perthshire
I got my Gold back in 1986 and duly collected a badge from Phil himself at St James' Palace, IIRC.

At that time the received wisdom was that gold DofE was 'as good as another A level' when it came to University entry. I'm not sure that it is strictly true but I do think it helped me get into medical school. I have spoken to some university admissions tutors and it is clear it is still very well regarded.

However, irrespective of career-enhancing benefits, it was a lot of fun and I'm very glad I did it. In some ways it was handed on a plate as I did it through air cadets, and you just needed to volunteer for the camps and sit the exams etc.
 

Goose

Need to contact Admin...
Aug 5, 2004
1,797
20
54
Widnes
www.mpowerservices.co.uk
I didn't do DofE myself but have experience of it through scouts.

I see it as a way of being independent and doing more for yourself and others. It has a lot more to it than just the expedition, it involves volountary service, learning new skills, new experiences, getting out and doing it. A lot of people on here might already be doing that and find the biggest problem is finding the time to fit stuff in for the log book!
I think too on applying for jobs that the DofE experience would make you a better applicant for most jobs, as would being in the scouts, cadets, or almost any other extra curricular activity, life experiences can make more difference than the certificate. But on a CV having the DofE award can be understood better than trying to explain what bushcrafting(for example) is never mind what experience you have.
You could probably count a bushcraft course or meetup toward the award too under "residential" :)
 
S

Siecroz

Guest
Hi

I've done my Gold and also help to run the DoE in the Army Cadet Force in the area (Northants), and used to run it at my old unit in Wales.

The DoE is a funny one.. it depends what you want to get out of it. The whole idea behind it is to get out of it what you put in. Its aimed towards personal development of yourself, your personal skills, your community skills, rising to the challenge and becoming more confident in Life itself.

The different sections, if undertaken correctly (your award leader should be able to advise you better) are staggered too. Under the different sections (i.e. skills) there are areas for those with no knowledge, with a little knowledge, and those with a lot of knowledge.

Risk assessments are an unfortunate part of the ever changing world of Health and Safety... With the Cadets we litterally have to do a risk assessment before we can open the doors to let in the cadets!! But thats the way of the world. However it can also make you think about things you didn't before:

Skill: Wood Turning -
RISK:- Cuts, Splinters, Abrasions
Control Measures:- Gloves, Care Taken, Correct tool handling
Residual Risk:- Infection of injuries
Additional MEasures:- First Aid Training & Kit, Anteseptic.

Sounds a little dramatic but thats what the world is turning into.

With regards to the Map & Compass, there is always room to progress with your own personal navigation skills. I have been instructing navigation for around 9 years now and even I pick up some new skills along the way. Document it as part of your evidence to put forward to the DoE Governing Body when it comes to assessment.

The whole system is designed around inspiring you to achieve something different and doing it off your own back. At the end having a sense of pride that you have acheived what you set out to do.

The Certificate and the Badge at the end of the day are simply a piece of Tin and Paper... its the Memories, and the ability to say "I Did that" that are the buz. Add to that is the Award is recognised these days by most Employers.. they recognise the fact that if you have had the staying power to undertake the Award.. you must have a little something going for you.

I could rant on about it all night.. but if you want any further advice... please ask. I'd be happy to expand. And Good luck :)
 

Spacemonkey

Native
May 8, 2005
1,354
9
49
Llamaville.
www.jasperfforde.com
My DoE on Dartmoor was basically a great way to sample scrumpy. 4 of us polished off a gallon container of the evil elixir and we felt proper rough the next day, but it was a right laugh, and i shall never forget the fair Mishca (sp? God knows-it's a bloody odd name, but her parents were hippies..) who I shared the tent with...
wink.gif



The best thing about DoE is following behind them picking up extra kit!! You can always spot them in the half term, Easter etc wandering the New Forest and Dartmoor. They have standard issue Millets gear with compulsory foam kip mat and sleeping bag rolled up in a clear bag attached to the outside of their red rucksaks. Up front are the Scout/cadets who enjoy this kind of thing and know where they are going and trailing behind are a stream of kids in various degrees of slouch until you get to the kids at the back who don't really want to be there!

all in all though, I think it is a good thing, especially for those kids in cities etc.
 

Fire Ferret

New Member
Dec 25, 2005
48
0
37
Edinburgh
Where I am in Aus the DoE is hard going, they are just short of flogging you up the mountain with a bull whip and letting you do it all yourself with someone who knows what they are doing as back up, it's hard yakka more endurance than knowledge (that was just that group though), still a good experience though
 

Ed W

Tenderfoot
May 7, 2005
66
0
29
West Yorkshire
I don't see how it can be a bad thing, I'm too young to do it at the moment (or most things like it :( ), it gets kids out of the house who probably would just play on an Xbox or something and gives them some outdoor experiences. It may even convert some of them to a more outdoor life.

At my school it is really encouraged and usually there are too many people that want to do it.
 

mark a.

Settler
Jul 25, 2005
540
4
Surrey
My wife did it way back when. It was very hard in places (mostly due to the Welsh weather and the rest of her team), but doesn't regret doing it. She and a friend ended up carrying another team member's rucksack, which weighed an absolute ton. And most of the weight? A huge makeup bag... very important on a Welsh mountainside (not).

I regret not doing either scouts or DoE.
 

ol smokey

Full Member
Oct 16, 2006
433
1
Scotland
It should be a good thing, if the powers that be, give members and instructors the proper training, I was involved in
setting the scheme up locally and went to great lengths to go by the leaders hand book, to ensure that all safety matters
were covered. I found that when the Local authority and schools took over the scheme, there were a lot of short cuts taken, and there was a greater emphasis on making sure that each local group won the appropriate award, at whatever level, instead of ensuring that no short cuts were taken in covering the supervision, and safety aspects.
I was asked to assess a group of girls on their GOLD EXPEDITION, and check on their safety, miles from any road
where access to them was impossible due to distance involved, if I was to locate them at their next check point,
which would have involved a mileage of hundreds of miles of motoring to get to them. I also found that no instruction
had been given to the group regarding the calorific value of foods, and various aspects that should have been covered.
Instruction and supervision of the group had been largely been left to the parents of the young people involved, and
as far as I could see they were fairly clueless.
 

honisoitquimalypense

Full Member
Sep 14, 2015
92
0
oxford
as i like bushcraft and outdoor activities i decided to do the duke of edinburgh award because i wanted to enhance my skills. Wanted to know if anyone else has done it or is doing it because at the moment it's a waste of time. I know more about maps than the qulified leader (and i'm no expert), we have to do risk assessments on everything (went on night walk, before we started had 1/2 talk about dangers like "might slip on styles"). We also had to buy these tiny little booklets for £10.50 which was atotal rip off and the whole system is just a bit rubbishy. Just wanted to hear your experiences of it.

The award scheme is not just an exped over 4 days as you have i guess already worked out. i did my gold late 70s and really enjoyed the community aspect of the award. the skills section is also something you can throw yourself into and use bushcrafts many skills to qualify. it like many things is you get out what you put in. so many employers still look on this as value to your CV starting out. never did me any harm. for you to state bit rubbishy probably means its not for you. and what do you get for 10.50 these days. i do the occasional bit of teaching for the gold exped and the participants always seem to have a great time being out in the hills, camping, navigating, doing command tasks.
the exped is a very small part remember
volunteering for something in the community is never rubbishy!!!!!
good luck
 
Last edited:

John Fenna

Lifetime Member & Maker
Oct 7, 2006
22,361
1,908
64
Pembrokeshire
DoE was not available to me in my youth (my teens were spent living abroad) but I became an assessor as an Adult.
Many of my Scouts did DoE as well as their Queens Scout Award and thoroughly enjoyed it.
The quality of instruction is variable but generally good - in my experience.
Many employers find that a DoE award adds a lot to a CV.
I would say to any young person - "Do it!".
 

Duggie Bravo

Nomad
Jul 27, 2013
494
109
Dewsbury
Worthwhile noting that the Expedition is only one of the 4 elements of the DoE.
You know more than the Leader? Great offer to teach, do you really know more or do you know what is being taught? Biiiiig difference and unless you have carried out a complete brain dump you will never know, quite often Cubs and Scouts will have a higher level of knowledge on map reading then I am teaching, that doesn't mean they know more.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Grumpy-Dad

New Member
Oct 18, 2015
1
0
Linwood, Scotland
DoE was not available to me in my youth (my teens were spent living abroad) but I became an assessor as an Adult.
Many of my Scouts did DoE as well as their Queens Scout Award and thoroughly enjoyed it.
The quality of instruction is variable but generally good - in my experience.
Many employers find that a DoE award adds a lot to a CV.
I would say to any young person - "Do it!".

Can't speak for DoE, but having completed my QSA back in the 90's it definitely featured highly on my CV and I was always asked about it at interviews etc, I'm certain it got me plenty jobs!
 

Kerne

Maker
Dec 16, 2007
1,766
21
Gloucestershire
I'm a DoE leader working with Bronze, Silver and Gold. The award is not only about the expedition (as others have said) and the other areas are equally important in the gaining of the award. In fact, most of the young people I've worked with over the years who have failed to complete the award have fallen down on the other aspects, not the expedition. I work with several schools and the organisation is excellent in all of them. My only gripe is the number of young people I've come across who have been forced into it by pushy parents who think it would "look good on their CV". (A 15 year old needs a CV?) Luckily, most of these get weeded out at the Bronze stage. As for the OP - map skills etc are only a part of the expedition experience. Planning, working as a team, using initiative etc. are also important. If the expedition aspect isn't challenging enough then you might like to push the boundaries a little more in the other aspects.
 

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