Do you forage for edible Fungi?

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do you forage and use edible fungi?

  • Yes, regulary in season

    Votes: 22 18.0%
  • Yes, now and then

    Votes: 31 25.4%
  • Yes, rarely

    Votes: 12 9.8%
  • No, but i'd like to

    Votes: 46 37.7%
  • no, other things to focus on

    Votes: 7 5.7%
  • Yuck, yuck, yuck yuck :-)

    Votes: 4 3.3%

  • Total voters
    122

Tony

White bear (Admin)
Admin
Apr 16, 2003
22,220
731
50
Wales
www.bushcraftuk.com
I was thinking over the weekend about how many people i know that actually forage for fungi to go in the food they eat. So, do you forage for fungi to eat? If you do it would be great to know what you go for and what you don't (and why)
If you don't it would be good to know why you don't, is it lack of knowledge (this is why I avoid a lot of them) or no time, or even no habitat near you to find them.

I've got one particular log that year on year grows jews ear and a field where we can go for puff balls et we don't do it that often, but i know we should, we're getting more and more berries each year but not fungi, It would be good to change that.

So, let us know what you're like with your fungi :D
 

Nagual

Native
Jun 5, 2007
1,963
0
Argyll
I've went for 'No, but I'd like to', although recently I've been keeping an eye out for likely shrooms. I've read a few books and vistited a few websites, but I honestly think that without having someone with you that knows their stuff, who can answer your questions on the spot, it's very hard.

My post here shows my confusion over IDing Chanterelles, Oysters and the like.

The habitat around Loch Eck should be teeming with 'shrooms of many different types as the environment is very diverse -: forestry pine, oak woodland, beach, birch, grasslands, marshy and dry. However due to, I think, my lack of 'getting my eye' in, I'm sure I'm missing loads. Either that or there just isn't that many about.
 

Melonfish

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jan 8, 2009
2,460
1
Warrington, UK
i've seen a fair bit around but my lack of knowledge is a bit of an issue.
i can recognise some species. in fact found a lovely young shaggy ink cap the other day but it was all on its lonesome in a hedge and thus i couldn't do say a mushroom omlette with it or owt.
would love to regularly go out for stuff, i do regularly see birch bolette and other tree based fungus but i've never had the pleasure of coming across any field mushrooms, chanterelles or anything else considered largely edible.
other then jews ear, but then i wouldn't consider it edible by human standards.
 

VirusKiller

Nomad
Jul 16, 2007
392
0
Hogsty End
I voted "No, but I'd like to". Like other posters, I don't have the knowledge to feel comfortable doing it for all, but the most recognisable fungi, so this is going to be an aspiration for some time.
 

spamel

Banned
Feb 15, 2005
6,833
21
44
Silkstone, Blighty!
I know where to find plenty of jews ears but they just don't appeal to me! Trying to find a god supply of boletes and chanterelles has eluded me since moving back to UK, very frustrating! On the other hand, since I am now confident with Amethyst Deceiver, I know where to get plenty of them and nearby is a patch of puffballs that I hope will show themselves in the next month or so. I need some good boletes though, I have very few left from Germany that I have eked out for over two years now! :(
 

gsfgaz

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 19, 2009
2,763
0
Hamilton... scotland
lack of knowledge is my reason, i would love to go mushy picking with somebody that knows there stuff.. just haven't got a clue what's edible...
 

spamel

Banned
Feb 15, 2005
6,833
21
44
Silkstone, Blighty!
That is the beauty of the organised meets such as Middlewood, Rough Close and Swift Valley. People attend that have a decent knowledge in all things fungal and there are one or two that are pretty much experts, although they'd never admit so themselves. You can learn a lot with somebody else showing you the ropes.
 

robin wood

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Oct 29, 2007
3,054
1
derbyshire
www.robin-wood.co.uk
Not as much now as in the past due to locality but still have a field near my workshop that is reliable for horse mushrooms every year. I know a few spots for St Georges and parasols. When I was in a woodland in Kent I used to dry large quantities of Boletus badius every year.

I like oysters which are simple and unmistakable to recognise, not a fan of other brackets like chicken in the woods or jews ear.
 
I went for "no but I'd like to"... I've been foarging for mushrooms to try to learn to identify some of the ones we get around here and I find the whole topic fascinating.
I don't forage fungi for food though, and that's because I don't trust my knowledge enough to not kill me.

I've had some confident IDs so far, and successfully identified one that grows reliably in our back garden as the inedible Yellow Stainer, which was a shame, but until I've actually had an experienced micologist take me through it and point out just what's meant by cucumber, aniseed and so on in the world of fungus. Some of it's just so subtle it's nigh on impossible to figure out alone and stay safe.

Given time though, I'll be foraging for sure.
 

Toadflax

Native
Mar 26, 2007
1,783
0
61
Oxfordshire
I voted for regular foraging, because I do go out mushroom hunting quite regularly in the Autumn every year (though in practice, I don't actually eat that much, due to lack of confidence in identification of more than 3 or 4 species).


Geoff
 

rancid badger

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
I find literally dozens of fungi when I'm out and about in Chopwell wood, as well as other places but I would never even consider trying to eat any of them.

I have been involved in several fungal forays here ( one coming up soon ) and(according to our expert) the vast majority of fungi found during these events are either inedible or downright lethal!


We are lucky, in that we have the services of Gordon Simpson,a grand old fella and a mycologist, now retired from service with the Forestry Commission, to keep us right but I never seem to get the time to learn much when we run these events:rolleyes:

Gordon usually makes it clear that in fact; ' Most fungi are edible, it's just that some are only edible once!'

anyway; I would love to learn more one day.

R.B.
 

gregorach

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Sep 15, 2005
3,723
26
47
Edinburgh
These days I don't seem to find myself in the right habit often enough, but if I'm in the right place at the right time then mushroom foraging is always on the agenda. It just seems wrong to know that there's a wonderful seasonal resource there for the taking for a very limited time and not use it. A wild mushroom feast is one of the highlights of Autumn for me. If I'm in good hunting grounds, I'll also dry as many as I can be bothered cleaning - it's great to be able to add a handful of dried boletes to a winter stew..
 

Nagual

Native
Jun 5, 2007
1,963
0
Argyll
Oblio13, would you mind putting some names to those shrooms there? The large clusters you are holding you look interesting, on a recent trip to Maclachlan MacLachlan of the clan Maclachlan's castle by Strathlachlan :D try saying that when you've had a few.. we saw something like that growing out of a poorly sycamore.