Burying tin cans??

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Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,774
1,860
S. Lanarkshire
I think there is a bit of confusion here; I never intended to bury any tins, this was pure curiosity.QUOTE]

I think the fact you asked shows that :D

It's actually a very relevant topic; this is the start of the main camping season for many people, especially those with families, and the country wide issue of littering (and the proliferation of rubbish) becomes a huge issue.

cheers,
Toddy
 

rik_uk3

Banned
Jun 10, 2006
13,320
20
65
south wales
Times change, when I was a young camper we were told to eat our food, flatten the cans and bury them, that was good camping practise; these days you pack them and they go home with you (or the skip at the side of Tesco).
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,548
638
Lancashire
I am in the search for a sealable plastic bag that can be put in boiling water or boiling water put in it. Anyone got aany ideas? I'm thinking of a light plastic bag to put dehydrated food in that can take boiling water to re-hydrate and then eaten out of without passing BPAs or other nasties into my system or melting away. I have tried a few tesco ones (ziplock with a slider and press ziplock ones) the press ziplock ones were best but not quite right. The ziplock ones went soft, tacky and contracted which means it has undergone a chemical or physical change. The press one was starting to so not quite there.

Basically if I can find one make that is cheap it will allow me a better way of cooking in the hills as I dislike actually cooking in my pot/mug only boil water (I hate washing up with a passion).
 

RAPPLEBY2000

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Dec 2, 2003
3,195
12
47
England
I am in the search for a sealable plastic bag that can be put in boiling water or boiling water put in it. Anyone got aany ideas? I'm thinking of a light plastic bag to put dehydrated food in that can take boiling water to re-hydrate and then eaten out of without passing BPAs or other nasties into my system or melting away. I have tried a few tesco ones (ziplock with a slider and press ziplock ones) the press ziplock ones were best but not quite right. The ziplock ones went soft, tacky and contracted which means it has undergone a chemical or physical change. The press one was starting to so not quite there.

Basically if I can find one make that is cheap it will allow me a better way of cooking in the hills as I dislike actually cooking in my pot/mug only boil water (I hate washing up with a passion).
I went through the same searching process...:(
I settled for Tesco sandwich bags.
(there are bags to roast chickens in but they are expensive and not that great anyway).

the other thing was I bought dried food in thicker plastic packaging and found I could pour boiling water straight into it!

another tip...drink herb tea then you don't have to worry about milk going off!

on my outdoor ed course there was one guy who always cooked fresh food he'd be peeling spuds and carrots every time, even up the mountains in bad weather!
( I totally respect that sort of dedication):eek:
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,774
1,860
S. Lanarkshire
I've seen boil in the bag bags for sale this week......for the life of me I can't remember where though......the only places I've shopped are Morrison's, Sainsbury's, Tesco, Lidl, B&M's and Focus, so it has to have been in one of them.
I bought gluten free flour in Morrison's, so it might have been beside that in the baking stuff :dunno:

I'll look when I'm out again though and pay more attention next time.

cheers,
Toddy
 

Bravo4

Nomad
Apr 14, 2009
473
0
51
New Mexico, USA
I think the idea of burying cans comes from the days when folks would just leave the cans in a pile beside their camp. The "tin can dump" was very common pre-WWII and remains still litter the west. There's a scene in "The Grapes of Wrath" that shows a good sized tin can dump.

An old tin can, hard times, and a church key= the origins of the hobo stove:)
 

poddle

New Member
I've seen boil in the bag bags for sale this week......for the life of me I can't remember where though......the only places I've shopped are Morrison's, Sainsbury's, Tesco, Lidl, B&M's and Focus, so it has to have been in one of them.
I bought gluten free flour in Morrison's, so it might have been beside that in the baking stuff :dunno:

I'll look when I'm out again though and pay more attention next time.

cheers,
Toddy

Gluten free flour, there is another name for that stuff Toddy, SAWDUST, does not taste like the real thing we used some last week... never again
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,774
1,860
S. Lanarkshire
Try it with fizzy water added, mix thoroughly and it makes a great crispy batter :D

Otherwise :sigh: I'm learning how to cook with it, but baking's still not quite the same.
On the other hand, the no aches is wonderful :D

If you add a little sorghum flour to it that helps to keep the rise in the flour for cakes and the like.
It makes carp pastry though :rolleyes:
Tattie scones are okay, biscuits are fine if a lot of ground nuts are added, and use fruit puree or finely chopped dried for cakes, anything else just sinks.

cheers,
Toddy
 

bushcraft_lad

New Member
Nov 7, 2008
259
0
U.K
I am in the search for a sealable plastic bag that can be put in boiling water or boiling water put in it. Anyone got aany ideas? I'm thinking of a light plastic bag to put dehydrated food in that can take boiling water to re-hydrate and then eaten out of without passing BPAs or other nasties into my system or melting away. I have tried a few tesco ones (ziplock with a slider and press ziplock ones) the press ziplock ones were best but not quite right. The ziplock ones went soft, tacky and contracted which means it has undergone a chemical or physical change. The press one was starting to so not quite there.

Basically if I can find one make that is cheap it will allow me a better way of cooking in the hills as I dislike actually cooking in my pot/mug only boil water (I hate washing up with a passion).
Maybe a pour 'n' store bag mate made of heavy plastic and boiling water can be added to it,Do a quick google search i know mike Dixon of stone age bushcraft sell's them on his

regards,Jord
 

MrEd

Full Member
Feb 18, 2010
1,450
392
Surrey/Sussex
www.thetimechamber.co.uk
Gluten free flour, there is another name for that stuff Toddy, SAWDUST, does not taste like the real thing we used some last week... never again
if you dont have a choice, then its better than not. and the gluten free stuff is way better than 4 or 5 years ago and much more widely available.

glutafin mini crackers are about the closest thing to ritz crackers you can get, and they are available on prescription!
 

poddle

New Member
I don't have to avoid gluten, but I was round at the Mums place last week, and she tried cooking with it, she is a good baker, but was not happy with the result.

I suggested that she sent the unused stuff to the Blue Circle factory in Westbury for testing, maybe they could make a new cement out of it.

Makes crap pastry that's for sure
 

beachlover

Full Member
Aug 28, 2004
2,303
143
Isle of Wight
I am in the search for a sealable plastic bag that can be put in boiling water or boiling water put in it. Anyone got aany ideas? I'm thinking of a light plastic bag to put dehydrated food in that can take boiling water to re-hydrate and then eaten out of without passing BPAs or other nasties into my system or melting away. I have tried a few tesco ones (ziplock with a slider and press ziplock ones) the press ziplock ones were best but not quite right. The ziplock ones went soft, tacky and contracted which means it has undergone a chemical or physical change. The press one was starting to so not quite there.

Basically if I can find one make that is cheap it will allow me a better way of cooking in the hills as I dislike actually cooking in my pot/mug only boil water (I hate washing up with a passion).
I got this from another forum, but try the resealable bags from Boots and other such places that breast feeding mothers use to put expressed breast milk in.
Hold enough for a one person portion, have a double seal, work a treat and cost about six quid for 40.
 

Alexlebrit

Tenderfoot
Dec 22, 2009
90
0
France
I've got an old Scout manual that says the same thing, how times change.

As for plastic bags, I try and avoid them too, they really don't biodegrade, and to be food safe you shouldn't really reuse them. If you're thinking of making boil in the bag to avoid washing up, then you're probably not thinking of bring them home sterilising and re-using anyway, and tossing them to buy more seems a right waste.

I read something the other day which while probably not always true made me think about plastic bags, it went something like this.

"The sh*t you dog just did will take 72 hours to dissolve into the ground, the plastic bag you just picked it up with will take 6000 years."
 

TinkyPete

Full Member
Sep 4, 2009
1,870
87
uk mainly in the Midlands though
OK one here from military training areas, now on most you are not allowed to did holes deeper than 2 ft due to damaging the area (Salisbury plain has alot of archaeology in it (95% of the plain)) in places where it is allowed it must be checked out by an archaeologist first and each corner must has a 10 fig grid reference, people often use the same sites to set up "camps" and bivi areas and so when you dig your shell scrape somewhere were people have been digging them in the same place for over 40 years it is amazing how many tins still keep coming up and now you have to take it with you now.