Best way to cook bread on a stick?

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TheViking

Native
Jun 3, 2004
1,864
0
31
.
Twistbread. :wink: Carve the top of a hazel (ideal) stick down to the wood. Make the dough into a long "sausage" looking thing and twist it around the stick. Hold over embers until spread and baked. It's not something we have with us in Sweden, but when I'm home it's no problem making a dough for it. :wink: Flour, water, salt. :wave:
 

TAZ

Tenderfoot
Aug 3, 2004
58
0
49
Farnborough, Hampshire
As "The Viking" said make the dough into a "twist". We do this with cubs upwards and have found you can add almost anything to it like cinnamon, dried fruit and chocolate. When cooked properly it will come off the green stick with a twist and pull action!
Another bread related thing is "camp donuts". (Ithink this is right) You make a jam sandwhich but put butter on the outside as well, then fry the sandwich till golden. Eat, although i have heard of people cooking the sandwich and then dipping it in sugar!!Happy heartattack.

Taz
 

match

Settler
Sep 29, 2004
707
4
Edinburgh
I use the following recipe for bannock:

2 cups Flour
1 tsp Salt
1/2 cup Water

Just mix it all together until it forms a dough. this can be cooked in any number of ways (wrapping round stick as described above, cooked on a flat surface (pan/skillet/hearthstone) or fried.

If you want a slightly nicer dough (more bread-like) then use the following:

3 cups flour (can use self-raising)
1/2 cup dried milk powder
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp salt
1 cup water or beer

This works better if cooked on a skillet/stone, as it tends to rise a bit, and fall off sticks as it swells. Alternatively, this can be used to make damper - which is basically a campfire bread - get a mess tin with a lid, put the dough in it and bury in the hot coals of a fire until the bread is cooked.

For camping, I tend to just pre-mix all the dry ingredients first, then add the liquid just before I start baking.
 

Ed

Admin
Admin
Aug 27, 2003
5,930
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South Wales Valleys
In the cubs it was called damper bread or something like that. Besides the basic mix, I like to add some milk powder which gives a lovely taste to the bread, may be some crushed trail mix or oats aswell :biggthump

:)
Ed
 

NickBristol

New Member
Feb 17, 2004
232
0
Bristol, UK
match said:
This works better if cooked on a skillet/stone, as it tends to rise a bit, and fall off sticks as it swells. Alternatively, this can be used to make damper - which is basically a campfire bread - get a mess tin with a lid, put the dough in it and bury in the hot coals of a fire until the bread is cooked.
About how long does it take to cook? I don't much fancy having to uncover hot coals a few times and finding either raw dough or charred remains...

ty Nick
 

Ed

Admin
Admin
Aug 27, 2003
5,930
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South Wales Valleys
About how long does it take to cook? I don't much fancy having to uncover hot coals a few times and finding either raw dough or charred remains...
ummmm..... that comes with expierience. The time it takes will basicly rely on 2 factors. First the size of your bread (a loaf will take longer than flat bread) and secondly the heat of your fire. Resinous woods (like pine) will burn very hot compared to others... also oxygen in the fire will change the temperature..... if you have a howling wind feeding your fire it'll be hot enough to forge metal!!!

You'll just have to experiment. If you take your bread out of the coals and its still a little under done, just leave your messtin/bread at the side of the fire to finish off, turning occasionaly to get even cooking.

:)
Ed
 

Emma

Forager
Nov 29, 2004
178
3
Hampshire/Sussex
Dampers are good with jam too. They don't fall off the sticks if you don't wrap the dough too thickly.
If you batter camp doughnuts then fry them they're even better.
 

al

Need to contact Admin...
Sep 18, 2003
346
1
kent
2 cups of flour , teaspoon of salt , table spoon of fat or use oil, teaspoon of baking powder, onion granules , garli powder , water, mix to dough , not too sloppy , sear in a pan then cook over a fire or twist on a stick , loveley, makes exellent wraps (fajitas)
 

Tvividr

Forager
Jan 13, 2004
232
0
Norway
www.gjknives.com
For short day trips I usually make the dough at home, and use a bit of yeast.
On extended trips I like to mix all the dry engredients first, and then add water when I am going to bake the bread.

All of the recipies already mentioned work quite well. When making the type of bread in that picture, and bake it together with the kids, I like to add a bit of sugar to make a more sweet tasting bread. They like that so much better, and ...aehm... so do I :lol:

Another simple recipy for a bannock type of bread would be :
4,5 dl flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons bakingpowder
50 gram butter / margarine
2 dl water
Herbs / spices, whole corn etc can be mixed into this, if you want to. The above is just the basic mix.
Mix all dry engredients including the butter / margarine and store in plastic bags or containers. Mix water without kneading dough too much when you are going to bake. Divide into "just about right sizes" and bake on the pan in your Trangia set (or whatever type of stove / cooking set you use). Take only about 15 min to mix and bake.
 

Tony

White bear (Admin)
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Apr 16, 2003
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I had a little play with the bread, for lunch with the family. Here's the results...

Cheese and Onion...



and dried fruit and nuts...




VEry tasy indeed, had it with scrambled eggs and we dipped some of the plain bread we made into hot syrup :yumyum:
 

match

Settler
Sep 29, 2004
707
4
Edinburgh
Tasty looking bread!

Out of interest, which recipe did you use for the Cheese and Onion bread? Or did you just use your own? *starts hunting around for his mess tin and a convenient campfire* - yum!
 

Tony

White bear (Admin)
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Apr 16, 2003
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This one :biggthump
match said:
If you want a slightly nicer dough (more bread-like) then use the following:

3 cups flour (can use self-raising)
1/2 cup dried milk powder
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp salt
1 cup water or beer

.
 

Ginger

New Member
Apr 8, 2004
31
0
Tony,

That's an interesting looking frypan/wok affair you are cooking yur bannock on.

What is it?
What is it made from?
How thick it is?
How heavy is it?
Does it spread heat evenly?
Where did you get it from?
Do you like it?
How much did it cost?

:)
 

match

Settler
Sep 29, 2004
707
4
Edinburgh
Glad the recipe was approved of Tone :eek:):

Must get out some more this winter - there's nothing nicer than hot bread off a campfire first thing on a frosty winters morning, with a nice hot cup of tea!
 

maddave

Full Member
Jan 2, 2004
4,177
34
Manchester UK
Tony said:
I had a little play with the bread, for lunch with the family. Here's the results...

Cheese and Onion...



and dried fruit and nuts...




VEry tasy indeed, had it with scrambled eggs and we dipped some of the plain bread we made into hot syrup :yumyum:
And the ones we had later were excellent too Tone.... *burp* :biggthump :You_Rock_