Auger bits - what are these for?

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mountainm

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Jan 12, 2011
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OK - I recently took a punt on 3 lots of auger bits and won 2 for a grand total of £2.20, the 2 I won are more obscure types. I wondered if anyone could elaborate on the intended uses for each type?
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mrcharly

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jan 25, 2011
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North Yorkshire, UK
The first row are all varieties of spade bits, I think. The square end makes me think that they are for a bit and brace drill.

The long flat ones on the bottom might be for turning a straight hole into a tapered hole, like you might want for a chair leg. Counter-sink bits to the right of those.
 

mountainm

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Jan 12, 2011
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The first row are all varieties of spade bits, I think. The square end makes me think that they are for a bit and brace drill.

The long flat ones on the bottom might be for turning a straight hole into a tapered hole, like you might want for a chair leg. Counter-sink bits to the right of those.
Thanks for that - what about the 2nd from right on the top row? It's a bit different compared to the other spades?
 

weaver

Settler
Jul 9, 2006
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North Carolina, USA
The two next to the countersinks are screwdrivers.

Looks like someone tried to use them as chisels.

The cone shaped twisted ones are called gimlets, they are for making screw starter holes so the wood won't split.

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Dave Budd

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most likely for cutting large diameter holes into thin materials such as door panels. A regular bit of any other type (before modern rubbish spade bits or forstener bits) will break through and mess up thin materials. I use an adjustable version of it in my brace for drilling holes in plastic barrels for water pipes (water butts) and through pywood sheets for the same reasons.
 

Dave Budd

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also, the countersink shaped bit on the left of the selection looks to be a flat diamond rather than conical, inwhich case it isn't a countersink but more ikey for driling either metal or stone. Most metal cutting bits have that tip format ;)