Arkansas Stones?

  • Hey Guest, For sale we have Hultafors Outdoor Knives with Firesteel PLEASE LOOK HERE for more information or use the Pay Now button in the sidebar

weaver

Settler
Jul 9, 2006
792
7
63
North Carolina, USA
They are great for keeping a fine surgical edge touched up often as in carving. But, for reshaping or rough sharpening they take far too long. Beginners get them and expect them to work like a DMT then get frustrated and start thinking they will never be able to sharpen anything.

The other reason is that they are bench stones. Meaning they are too fragile to take into the bush where they may be broken easily.

Most folks use a strop or an extra fine DMT instead. Your bush knife doesn't need to be surgical sharp, I consider it a waste of time to sharpen beyond 600 grit on a knife that is going to be doing mostly rough work.
 

Native Justice

Forager
Apr 8, 2008
142
0
Littleton, CO USA
Arkansas stones are my favorite stone and use them frequently because they are not an aggressive stone. They are mostly a finishing stone in that they polish as they sharpen. I keep an 4" x 1" Arkansas stone with me at all times, one that I sandwiched with a translucent and a soft arkansas and glued together with epoxy. I enjoy sitting and sharpening in spare moments in the field. I am one that don't believe it's a waste of time to do better than a 600 grit edge on a knife because a polished edge will last longer, cut more effectively and cut more predictably by not hanging up in what your cutting like a coarser grit edge. Get a good Arkansas stone and they'll last forever and become a trusted friend like your knife.
 

pwb

Full Member
I use my Grandfathers old oil stones, heavy almost black and look like a natural product rather than a manufactured abrasive.

Could they be Arkansas stones ?

Enjoy using them, kind of an heirloom and they put lovely polish on the edge.

Cheers,

Pete.
 

Native Justice

Forager
Apr 8, 2008
142
0
Littleton, CO USA
I use my Grandfathers old oil stones, heavy almost black and look like a natural product rather than a manufactured abrasive.

Could they be Arkansas stones ?

Enjoy using them, kind of an heirloom and they put lovely polish on the edge.

Cheers,

Pete.

Those are most likely the Black Surgical Arkansas stones that typically fall in the 2000-4000 grit if they are of fine quality or 1500-2000 grit if they are typical quality. Either should give you a very nice finished edge.

In my experience, the Norton Translucent and Black Arkansas, White Hard Arkansas and Soft Arkansas stones are the best of the best. I enjoy using them even more than ceramics. They have a feel that transmits how they are sharpening and can give you info through your fingers when it's time to flip the blade or change to the next finer grit. They really rock when they are good ones.

Hall' and Dan's are the best of the rest and typically have frequent inclusions and mineral deposits that cause soft spots.

Arkansas' don't have to cost a fortune. Just have to look harder to find the good ones.

:You_Rock_
 

Chinkapin

Settler
Jan 5, 2009
746
1
80
Kansas USA
I have a small one about 4 inches long and about 1 inch wide that is a translucent one. It is extremely hard and smooth (I have no idea of the grit) but it is the best thing I have ever found for finishing a blade. I would say it is no more fragile than a piece of flint. I have carried mine around in the woods for years, completely unprotected in a pocket, and I haven't broke it yet. Native Americans carried around flint knives in the bush and didn't worry about breaking them, and they took a lot harder use. Of course, on the other hand, I have friends who could break an anvil, if you let them borrow it. I'm sure that if you got the two ends in a bind, such as having it in your hip pocket and then squatting down, you might break it, but if you carry it in your shirt pocket, it would be extremely unlikely to happen.

I also have a much softer one of the same size that I like to start off with. I have had mine so long that I don't remember where i bought them or how much I paid for them, But I know that it wasn't all that much.
 

pwb

Full Member
Those are most likely the Black Surgical Arkansas stones that typically fall in the 2000-4000 grit if they are of fine quality or 1500-2000 grit if they are typical quality. Either should give you a very nice finished edge.

In my experience, the Norton Translucent and Black Arkansas, White Hard Arkansas and Soft Arkansas stones are the best of the best. I enjoy using them even more than ceramics. They have a feel that transmits how they are sharpening and can give you info through your fingers when it's time to flip the blade or change to the next finer grit. They really rock when they are good ones.

Hall' and Dan's are the best of the rest and typically have frequent inclusions and mineral deposits that cause soft spots.

Arkansas' don't have to cost a fortune. Just have to look harder to find the good ones.

:You_Rock_

Thanks for the info :) .

I have three stones, two smaller ones ( 5 1/2" x 1 3/4" ) I would describe as medium.
The largest stone ( 10 " x 2 3/4 " ) I think must be of very fine grit, can't use it until the edge is really quite well established as it shows up every imperfection and drags, makes It's a good finishing stone before stropping .

Cheers,

Pete.
 

Hultafors Outdoor knife for Sale

We have a a number of Hultafors Outdoor Knives with Firesteels for sale.

You can see more details here in this thread OUTDOOR KNIVES The price is £27 posted to the UK. Pay via the paypal button below.