A week on foraged wild food.

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Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
36,893
2,772
S. Lanarkshire
Pictures!!! Uh.... well, perhaps not.


Sometimes the researcher bit in you is just a tad visceral :rolleyes: :D

The digestive system bit is a good point though; is this diet heavier on the roughage than your usual one Fiona ?
Upset guts are not a good survival strategy.

cheers,
M
 

udamiano

On a new journey
Going good Xylaria goodjob


Keep it up. hows the energy levels, and concentration and focus holding up? usually find its those quiet times when the hunger kicks in the most.


Hot Chocolate LOL I don't begrudge a girl her hot choccy in the slightest, definitely earned it on the cycle trip thats for sure.



Really good thread, reading with interest


Day
 

lannyman8

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jan 18, 2009
4,005
3
Dark side of the Moon
hay up Fi, how goes it????

just a question, but have you thought of worms, and if so other than the obvious like wild garlic and onions what makes them taste a bit better, i find they are very muddy and not too good taste wise????

many thanks and respect.

chris.
 

xylaria

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
The soup I made yesterday was would of been edible under normal curcumstance, but think like nipponsoppa and nettle curry there is natural limit to how much bladderwrack one can eat. i had to mouthfuls and couldnt stomach anymore. This morning i spent most eating bulrushes and i when out and got more parnsips which i ate as soon as i got home. i ate a load of nuts as well and a bit of fruit leather. i was feeling proper hungry this morning. I just felt like i just kept eating, and then you realise snow it is on its way. I did go warm hunting while turning the ready compost out on to the garden, My compost heap only had little ones, however the leaf bin had some really big daddys. The old man said the need sqeezing before cooking, the net consences is put them in flour or oats. They are going to get both, but to be truthful i have now realised why skelitons i saw when worked have worn down teeth, you give up been bothered about grit when you are hungry enough.
So we drove out to burry port and got a massive amount of mussles. the snow was starting the fall and settle as we got back. This makes foraging more difficult, you cant spot stuff under a white blanket, so when out and yet more parnsips. If this is sounding a bit repetave, try it, you go for what highest value food, not for what sound posh.
DSC00038.jpg
parnsip as the snow started to settle

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What the root look like

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My tea the black sludge is ink cap mushroom pate, hazelnuts and cockles and raost parnsips.
 

swyn

Full Member
Nov 24, 2004
846
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Eastwards!
I've been reading this with interest, brilliant! My Q is purely a personal one as I'm not out there 'foraging' for my supper, although my wife is in charge of the vegetable protein we eat. Much of which is 'in store' or in our polytunnel as I write.
At the moment it is so easy to 'plink' a pidgeon from almost anywhere. The same goes for pheasants and possibly starlings too. Would you consider a 'meat' infusion to your diet alongside the seafood and greens?
My old late traditional farmer friend had a aversion to 'salt pork' later in his life as this, he explained, was very much a part of his staple diet along with caged wabbit as a young man in the 1930's. I would not consider a purely 'meat' meal but in a similar vein to how we eat as a family, where a single bird goes for four meals bulked out by vegetables and rice then finally soup.
Thank you for being brave and trying this!
Swyn.
 

swyn

Full Member
Nov 24, 2004
846
5
62
Eastwards!
Having had a conversation over 'seafood supper' (sorry there xylaria) with my wife, certain parts of conversations with the 'older generation' have been remembered.
Again this is from pre-WW2 so 1930's. This particular gentleman lived in a tumbledown cottage and, as I have been told, had a cauldron (probably an ordinary hanging pot) over the fire into which each and every days forage went into. The story goes on that when this was re-heated to bring up to the correct temperature and probably boil, to soften whatever had been thrown in, the maggots that were floating on the surface were then thrown to the cat and after that a bowlfull was scooped out and eaten.
I would ask if you have considered the boiling pot option in that you will always have something 'on the go' as it were. Possibly without the maggots though :) Ooops!
Swyn.
 

winst0nsmith

Tenderfoot
Jan 8, 2012
81
0
South West Wales
Having had a conversation over 'seafood supper' (sorry there xylaria) with my wife, certain parts of conversations with the 'older generation' have been remembered.
Again this is from pre-WW2 so 1930's. This particular gentleman lived in a tumbledown cottage and, as I have been told, had a cauldron (probably an ordinary hanging pot) over the fire into which each and every days forage went into. The story goes on that when this was re-heated to bring up to the correct temperature and probably boil, to soften whatever had been thrown in, the maggots that were floating on the surface were then thrown to the cat and after that a bowlfull was scooped out and eaten.
I would ask if you have considered the boiling pot option in that you will always have something 'on the go' as it were. Possibly without the maggots though :) Ooops!

Swyn.

I think that was called "pease pottage/porridge" which gave us the rhyme:

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
 

woodstock

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 7, 2007
3,568
65
65
off grid somewhere else
Good 'elth Fiona, I'm now subscribed ;)
Thank you for taking the time to share your trial.

Can I ask the unasked ?

How have your bodily functions altered ? Frequency/consitution etc ? Cheers Chis

You don't want to know honestly think of rotten meat and cabbages x 5 and your just about there
 

Zingmo

Eardstapa
Jan 4, 2010
1,276
90
S. Staffs
Well done. I have to say that your meals don't look too appetising. Do they smell good?
As with anything in the world of bushcraft you have to set a starting point which can sometimes seem arbitrary. I think what you are doing is fascinating - I am going to be hunting for wild parsnips this week! I for one am not going to cry foul because you didn't eat with a spoon you carved yourself with a knife you forged from foraged bog iron!

Keep it up. I am guessing it is going to get harder as you go on.

Z
 

dwardo

Maker
Aug 30, 2006
6,311
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Wealth of info great thread :)
I cant help feeling that you are taking on this task with one hand tied behind your back with not eating meat.
Some of the processed stuff looks shocking your very brave.
 

xylaria

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
WARNING THIS POST CONTAINS TOO MUCH INFORMATION.
My movements are any much differant, one a day, volume of you get from lentil curry. Seaweed as anyone who ever in eaten the local delicacy Laver bread will tell produces wind that out competes brussel sprouts by a long shot. I keep munching on wintercress to sweetens the air a bit.

I am not eating anywhere near the amount of calories I normally consume, but you dont get to be 2 stone overweight without some effort. I think i am eating about the 1000 calorie mark. Tommorrow will be interesting foraging with a cover of snow to contend with. There is edible plants that could i eat, but they arent calorific enough to both with. but i might collect to vary the flavour a little.

I started to to get a little short tempered today, but i feel alright now.

i do eat meat, the old man has looked for road kill got nothing. I am not fussy but the badgers around here arent edible. i have a trap for squirrels but it has never caught anything. He has permission but he doesnt like moving the rifle without a car, after a little incident in coventy with armed responce and the helicopter [he had permission then as well]. a friend with permission on the other side of the county has offered a goose or a duck. Which is a mouth watering offer. Not for the meat just the prospect of grease.
 
Last edited:

Robbi

Full Member
Mar 1, 2009
9,538
579
northern ireland
LOL ! thanks for that Fi !

i'm very interested in the "state of mind" side of things with this, ie: your short temper etc. looking forward to your next post and good luck eating tomorrow !
 

udamiano

On a new journey
WARNING THIS POST CONTAINS TOO MUCH INFORMATION.
My movements are any much differant, one a day, volume of you get from lentil curry. Seaweed as anyone who ever in eaten the local delicacy Laver bread will tell produces wind that out competes brussel sprouts by a long shot. I keep munching on wintercress to sweetens the air a bit.

I can imagine smiley-fart006.gif and not the best time of year to leave the windows open LOL
 

xylaria

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Bwytais i bryfed genwar. Mondays I go to welsh language classes with my mum. So for breakfast I thought might keep me fuller for long i ate mostly mussles with the last of the ink cap pate, it worked i have felt fine all day. I had time for a quick forage after class on the salt marshes. In the space of a few minutes I got sea beet, sea radish leaves and a chickweed. Sea beet is very plentyful, and the radish spices food up nicely. cooked up the sea beet with a small amount of radish and some cress to give a little pepper then i cooked up the worms. I had read if you just wash them and leave in flour overnight they purge, they dont you are better off squeezing them before cooking them.

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there several types of cress that are commonly found, they give a nice pepper taste.

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I ate worms.
 

John Fenna

Lifetime Member & Maker
Oct 7, 2006
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The only way I can stomache worms is to fry them until they resemble pork scrathings them crumble them into soups ... but I guess that does the food value very little good....
 

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