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  • UPDATE - The main upgrade is now finished. The site should now be functioning as normal, I will be making tweaks over the weekend, particularly to look of the site. If you notice something is broken or have any comments please let me know. Many thanks Matt (Lithril)
  1. Uilleachan

    Tick removed....now what?

    If you find a tick, remove it and keep an eye out for excessive swelling and or the bullseye rash. But more importantly, as the bullseye rash doesn't always apear, keep a weather eye on your general health. If you notice joint pain or flue-like symptoms etc. up to a few weeks after, go to the...
  2. Uilleachan

    oilskin haversacks

    Reinforced UPVC bags are quite popular for caving/potholing/canyoneering/kayaking trips/workbags/hauling sacks/rope bags. There's basic rucksack types fancy holdalls paperboy bags and dry bags, available in different sizes. Very practical and hardwearing. Only trouble is they tend to come in...
  3. Uilleachan

    In the paddle strokes of the Inuit

    Can't find it, and when I mentioned it to my pal he said he'd drop it round, which he did but it was the wrong book. So back at square one. The likely looking books that I've tracked down on Amazon are too recent, my pal apparently got the books at a knockdown price from a bookshop that closed...
  4. Uilleachan

    In the paddle strokes of the Inuit

    Nor me, well not by boat.
  5. Uilleachan

    In the paddle strokes of the Inuit

    I'll have to have a look for that book, I may have lent it out and not received it back. But fear not, the fellow who put me onto it has the complete collection so I should be able to track it down through him. I'll report back. Sliochd = Progeny/seed/descendants/offspring/children...
  6. Uilleachan

    In the paddle strokes of the Inuit

    Yes, a good read that. Just a couple of more points to add to what you've said above, off all the kayaks held at one time or other by various universities organisations etc. and described two were of slightly different shape to the majority but sound very similar to each other, and one of...
  7. Uilleachan

    In the paddle strokes of the Inuit

    Dark age monks traveled seeking out similar ascetic hardships to that which the earlier Desert Fathers' sought in the wilderness of the middle east. Their searching took them up the eastern atlantic seaboard, and then all the way to at least Iceland and probably Greenland and parts of what is...
  8. Uilleachan

    Tides

    The BBC do a good visual tide table, this page is set to scotland so select your own area from the top left of the page and then click on the place closest to you for a visual reference. http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/coast_and_sea/tide_tables/7 We're in neaps at the moment springs arriving next...
  9. Uilleachan

    In the paddle strokes of the Inuit

    Thanks Boatman, just ordered a copy of that.
  10. Uilleachan

    In the paddle strokes of the Inuit

    Fishing from the boat and not being shy of sushi would help with the en route shopping :p I've a book somewhere that charts the rise and demise of the greenland whale fishery, a great read. It talks quite a bit about the Inuit some of whom traveled aboard the various ships in different rolls...
  11. Uilleachan

    In the paddle strokes of the Inuit

    A couple of lads have paddled from Greenland to Scotland, to recreate the trips made by the Inuit of the 17-1800's http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-37295203 Respect!
  12. Uilleachan

    Never forget the Danger of Deadfalls

    Got one in the old pine at the foot of the garden that detached last winter, hanging like a sword of Damocles. May have to climb up and cut it but it'll be difficult to do safely without cutting quite a bit of live wood, so reckoning on a winter gale bringing it down. Best all round for the...
  13. Uilleachan

    Rope

    Well, "self rescue" is a fairly open term. Ropes semi-static or dynamic for use in any situation that involves live people/casualties should meet the minimum standards. These standards have been developed for a reason. EN892 dynamic rope, for example, was born out of the old UIAA...
  14. Uilleachan

    Is this not unbearable ?

    Thats extreme for sure but when I'm planning for the midge, thats what I'm planning for. Had one doing that bad already this year, but it didn't last long thanks to a handy breeze getting up at just the right moment. Still pulling dead midges out of my jacket pockets a month after the event...
  15. Uilleachan

    Cotton kills

    If you could keep the water and wind off, why not. Jeans are hard wearing handy items, but not suited to prolonged periods worn in inclement conditions remote from shelter. When they get wet in cool conditions it takes a lot of energy to dry them off, if you add in more rain and some wind; a...
  16. Uilleachan

    (Yet another) Ventile question...

    Never used any treatments on either of the ventile jackets I've had. Present jacket is a double Hilltrek Rannoch which gets worn very regularly ( 2010 or 2011 vintage) and still working as well as the day I got it. Planning another for winter mountaineering use, but reckon I'll get another...
  17. Uilleachan

    Cotton kills

    Nothing wrong with sums :rolleyes: It's a balmy 15ºC here today, 2x + 30 = 60ºf, minus a wee bit, so 59ºf :p Which is hot enough with a sweater on, or in my case my cotton tee shirt and the stove cranked with half a bucket. However here's a couple of Centigrade windchill charts...
  18. Uilleachan

    Cotton kills

    Good stuff. As a rough guide to conversion from Celsius to Fahrenheit; double the ºC figure and add 30. So 16ºC becomes 62ºf which is only a little out, 1.2ºf. Works in reverse, deduct 30 and half the remainder. 36ºf becomes 3ºC, again thats just a little out and should be 2.22ºC. Not exact...
  19. Uilleachan

    HW95/98 Welsh Wille Tuned .177 CS500 stock

    Lovely looking rifle
  20. Uilleachan

    Cotton kills

    Cotton is great at keeping a body cool, on the hill in summer when things get hot soaking a tee shirt in a stream ringing it out a bit and then wearing it is brilliant for cooling off after exertion. Works the same way in the winter, if you get a cotton tee shirt wet. Not good. Cotton...