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What is this (possibly wild garlic leek)

Discussion in 'Flora & Fauna' started by johnnytheboy, Mar 21, 2010.

  1. Toadflax

    Toadflax Native

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    Location:
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    I'd have to agree there. In all my experience, Ramsons leaves are broader than the ones in the picture.


    Geoff
     
  2. Melonfish

    Melonfish Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    In my defence they were very early in the season.
    anyway on to the house eating!

    Hmmm Roughage...:D
     
  3. Asa Samuel

    Asa Samuel Native

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    It's definitely wild garlic but I am 99.9999% sure that's three-cornered leek, not ramsons. Very tasty but less garlicy and more oniony.
     
  4. Oblio13

    Oblio13 Settler

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    Location:
    New Hampshire
    We have both broad-leafed and narrow-leafed varieties of wild leeks/ramps/ramsons here. The narrow-leafed are rare.

    Wilt some greens in a skillet with olive oil, crack an egg on top of it, then flip the whole mess so the top of the egg cooks a little.
     
  5. Osprey

    Osprey Forager

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    Location:
    Aberdeenshire
    Wait until it flowers to be sure of its identity. Ramsons Allium ursinum, has star-shaped flowers whilst the three-cornered leek Allium triquetrum and the few-flowered leek Allium paradoxum both have bell shaped flowers. Up here in Aberdeenshire we have a lot of the few-flowered leek, it is non-native and a garden escapee, all are good to eat, so enjoy!
     

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