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What gear would you take with you thread and why.

Discussion in 'Kit Chatter' started by Lltfdaniel, Oct 17, 2019.

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  1. Lltfdaniel

    Lltfdaniel Member

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    Fair enough, it has made me think twice also weary of people who have a problem about my gear and why i took it with me.

    I understand that there needs to be experience to how much you need and how much we would use our gear and how much you need, for me i would binge so i need well you folks know but people new to this thread well they have an idea.

    I accept and know i wasn't listening to people who have far better knowledge than i but we all have our preferences to what gear we need and yes i already knew it was excessive but that was already pointed out.

    Also i understand it was like how to suck eggs with the shopping list in a way.

    Anyways i am lazy have to admit, i will have to learn the hard way, but i am happy with my choice of gear and it will be put to the test, and yea it would be wiser to listen to people or would be life threatening yes but i would be casual camping and have changed me mind about camping in scotland because of that potential life threatening situation.

    As for 2020 winter moot, that is one of the reasons why i have spent time looking at gear online, i also understand that my choice of gear would not be touched by experienced people.

    I understand that you would not need certain items if i attend the 2020 winter moot.

    If i get grilled again then so be it but i have to admit i am inconsistent but i won't be taking the same approach because i was not listening to advise but at a later time point i would if my gear is not up to snuff..so the winter moot would be a far better forgiving experience instead of doing running instead of learning to walk.

    Anyways since i am inconsistent i have to edit, and the reason why some if not most would not use the gear i choosen is because of the weight.

    Edit again,

    And or going with less posh gear and use a normal 2 litre coke bottle, but because i am lazy i know i want kit that is already done for you.

    Dan.
     
    #61 Lltfdaniel, Oct 21, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2019
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  2. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    One more thing: You need far less stuff than you think, specially in clothing.
    It sounds disgusting, but it is OK to have a bit of natural smell coming from your body. I personally feel that I smell less, for longer, in all natural fiber fabrics, specially socks.

    You had a buying list. I see it more as a 'wish list'. What I would recommend it for you to go to a couple of stores and have a look/feel. A picture might be worth a thousand words, but a good feel and poke is worth a thousand pictures!

    That Victorinox for example, is hugely uncomfortable to use.
    When I was young I had something similar, maybe not as extreme though. As a spare.
    The More I showed was not a joke. A good knife to learn with. Also Hi Vis, so you will find it when you drop it.
    Superb steel!
     
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  3. Lltfdaniel

    Lltfdaniel Member

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    I clicked on the image of the knife you showed me, is it the > https://morakniv.se/en/product/scout-39/ ?

    As for shopping online, you can't beat shops you visit to try the stuff out unlike buying online.
     
  4. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Yes, it is a Scout Safe. Which means the tip is blunt. It is a knife most boys of my generation learned their knife skills on. Got the first cut finger from.
    I am assuming you are a 'newbie' when it comes to knives too, if you are not do not get offended.

    There are two periods in the knife skill curve where you WILL hurt yourself. In the beginning, and when ou get enough skill to feel comfortable.
    We all have cut ourselves. That is why they invented the plaster!

    It does not matter that it is a 'scout' knife. The blade is made from a steel, superior to most.
    Because it is cheap, you can destroy it ( learning how to sharpen and hone), or even lose it, without crying. Just get another one.

    If you have more 'blade skills', the same manufacturer makes many more styles. All very affordable.

    Not beautiful, pure 'function before beauty'.
     
  5. Lltfdaniel

    Lltfdaniel Member

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    The thing is with this winter moot 2020 i don't want people looking at me as if too say, wtf?

    I being a total newbie i don't know what gear to bring to fit in you see, anyways gear expectation and have not found what ideal gear to bring on the moot website,

    edit,

    I found this so am reading > http://www.bushmoot.com/guidelines .

    Bring & Buy
    • A great opportunity to sell on gear that you no longer need and find the gear you do.
    • Run by BushMoot staff.
    • Available to all attendees that want to sell their own stuff or items they have made.
    • 10% of money taken goes to the BushMoot organisers.
    • All items should be priced before putting on the tables, tags will be provided.
    • Please sell appropriate items, we're at the BushMoot, rather than a car boot sale.
    • Any questions ask at reception.
    • If you have a commercial interest please contact us to discuss trading.
     
  6. dwardo

    dwardo Maker

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    At the end of the day unless you are in extreme weather or terrain conditions you could pretty much survive in nawt but your undies for one evening. You would likely be freezing possibly hypothermic, certainly be miserable but you would probably survive.
    The potential problems however remote start when you add more variables. So to list a few.

    Cutting tools - Cutting a pinky to severing an artery. Add first aid skills to this and there is a better chance of things not ending in misery/disaster. Add remote emote terrain/extreme weather and the % of a poor outcome rises rapidly.
    Cooking/Fire - Blistered finger to setting your self and or your surroundings on fire or stove exploding. Add skills here and you can protect you and your environment. Again remote remote terrain/extreme weather and the % of a poor outcome rises rapidly for you and the wilderness!

    I guess what I am trying to say is "bit at a time" but that doesn't have to equal boring. Certainly doesn't mean 0 risk either but it will increase the % of having fun and enjoying your self which is what its all about. The big variables are the ones you want to add slowly and with a get out plan.

    So far as getting your kit right :roflmao::roflmao: show me one person on here who says they have it sorted and ill show you a fibber, after all its half the fun.
     
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  7. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Do not worry, nobody will look at you and laugh. Remember, every one of us started knowing nothing.


    In Sweden we have a couple of old sayings. You need to cut yourself to appreciate the sharpness of a knife. Burn flesh hurts.

    At the moot, people will be happy to show you everything. from how to hold a knife, to set up a tent/tarp, to how to find dry wood.
    If I may suggest, maybe somebody might be happy to 'buddy up' with you beforehand?
    Or, if you have the funds, do a weekend 'beginners course'.
    I know Ray Mears' company does some. But you will probably not meet him.

    Buy only the basics, as good quality as you can. Follow advice here.

    Buying the wrong equipment is wasting your money, money you can (later) buy a really nice, handcrafted knife for!
    Some impressive knife makers on this Forum!
    :)
     
    #67 Janne, Oct 21, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2019
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  8. Lltfdaniel

    Lltfdaniel Member

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    Yes it is half the fun,

    My outdoor clothing well i already have said my carinthia over jacket and carinthia over trousers along with this the fjallraven-nordic-heater seems like a half decent head ware to keep you warm done research in reviews and what people think about the hat but i will see........

    Had a look at sleeping mattresses and i might get the https://www.klymit.com/catalog/prod...ulated-static-v-luxe-sl-camping-sleeping-pad/ unless anybody here has a suggestion on cheaper sleeping mats but i want to sleep like a queen, it has a r value of 6.5.

    I have owned the exped syn mat and it was ok comfort wise cost £50 which was on offer at the time, but you had to man handle it to get the air out, it later failed due to the valve bit it leaked air so i won't be getting another exped mat but the klymit mat since i watched some review videos on you tube seems to free flow deflate without any effort what so ever.

    I also own a alp kit inflatable mat and also the same you have to man handle it again to get air out of it.

    Please let me know what you think.

    Dan.
     
    #68 Lltfdaniel, Oct 21, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2019
  9. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    To goddamn heavy. And can be punctured.
    I have been using a closed cell mat, until I bought a Coleman self inflating mat two years ago. Which leaked and deflated halfway through the first night in a long weekend a year later.

    If you choose a decent area of ground, prepare it well, then have a closed cell mat, and a good sleeping bag, that is enough cushioning.
    Get a sleeping bag with synthetic fill on the bottom, stays more fluffy than down.

    Scr$w the R value. I have slept on snow and ice with only a c.c. mat and a winter grade sleeping bag.
     
  10. Lltfdaniel

    Lltfdaniel Member

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    Okay i already own a https://www.varusteleka.com/en/product/finnish-sleeping-mat/17334 so you have saved me alot of money...

    Here it is just took a photo of it just now below.

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    That place sells good stuff.
    If you place it on a carpeted floor, then a sleeping bag on top, that is about the 'softness you get in a forest with a normal layer of pine needles on.
    You can improve the ground softness by placing fallen leaves, or more needles.
    I do not advocate chopping down pine boughts unless it is winter and you are in north of Sweden.

    My cellfoam mats are a little bit more primitive, had them since the early 80's. One summer one and one winter one. 6mm and 10mm?
     
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  12. C_Claycomb

    Mod

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    I have been going to the Moot (albeit the summer one) since we started using the site back in 2004. It is car camping, with maybe a little carrying, but like all car camps, you can choose to simulate aspects of back pack camping, but with the safety net of more gear in the car. We get plenty of beginners coming to Moots, and while there may be some quiet shaking of heads, if someone is willing to learn there will be no shortage of folk willing to help and advise. We do not gather together in cliques to point and snigger!

    When I was starting out, I found that it was something of an inspiration to reading stuff by US thru-hikers, such as:
    http://hikinghq.net/sul.html
    http://hikinghq.net/packing_list.html
    (seem to work better from IE rather than Chrome)

    https://whiteblaze.net/forum/conten...to-Dirt-Bag-and-Deal-Shop-Like-a-Professional

    If you are car camping, bring stuff from home, doesn't need to be special "camping" versions. Then you see if you will use it or not. It is often surprising what you do not use. You might think that you will need a kettle because at home you are always drinking tea, then find that when camping you only remember to boil water for tea every other day or so, or maybe just once a day, and your regular cooking pot will do fine. Maybe you think you will need spare trousers, and find that at the end of a week you are still in the pair you started with (no need to change them unless you have set them on fire). Your aim should be to gain comfort with what you really need, without having spent too much money up-front.

    Best of luck :bigok:
     
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  13. Nomad64

    Nomad64 Full Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    If you are serious about this, I strongly suggest that before spending any more money or asking any more questions, you have a look at the thread linked to below then cancel whatever else you were planning to do this weekend and throw whatever you think you might need into the boot of your car and get yourself up to the Midlands for the North Woods meet.

    https://bushcraftuk.com/community/i...-meet-25-27-october-2019.153540/#post-1912550

    A great bunch of lads and a few lasses (who may not be the most prolific posters on this forum) but who get together every couple of months to do bushcrafty stuff in some beautiful woodland. There will be at least as many different camping and kit set ups as people there (probably not much more than 10-20) and lots of friendly and non-judgmental advice. No one will laugh at you (although probably best to keep any “I :emoji_heart_eyes:Bear Grylls” tattoos covered) and you will leave with a much better idea of what to take (and just as importantly what to leave behind) to the winter moot and/or Scotland next year.

    Good luck! :)
     
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  14. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    That's a good idea. When I go to the moot in go by train so can't carry much as I also have spine and leg problems. I cope very well for a week with minimal gear, and I'm very comfortable. Mind you i have many years of experience and have refined my kit over many many years.
    When I first started I had the cheapest and minimal gear and I'd be quite happy spending a week or so camping. Mind you in those days I had little money so everything had to be cheap and functional.
    I began with a two man ridge tent a camping gas stove foam mat and a cheap envelope style sleeping bag. A cheap aluminium cookset. Plastic mug bowl and plate and a normal kitchen knife fork and spoon. That was the sum total of my gear apart from a cheap millets rucksack.
    I camped from march right into the late autumn with that set up.
    Nowadays I use a hammock and tarp and only camp in the summertime. I need a chair to sit in and a small table to prep food and cook on. Apart from that the gear is have is very similar to 40 years ago.
    Yes I have better gear but it's not expensive stuff. Nowadays I have a pocket rocket stove which is smaller lighter safer and more efficient. A mummy style down bag, again lighter warmer and packsize is smaller. My pans are better quality and stainless steel so more robust, if a bit heavier. But I've saved weight on the other two items and can afford the extra weight of the stainless. I pack my stove and other bits into the pots to save space.
    All in all the amount of stuff I take has not changed much... just the quality.
     
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  15. Lltfdaniel

    Lltfdaniel Member

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    Just looking for advise but,

    Would you take an insulated bottle, the reasons for this is it will save you the effort of digging out your backpack for the stove to boil water and whilst on the go i would not be bothered to do that so, yea plus if you have your camping tent up and equipment packed out of the bag when you pitch at night and boil water and have a freeze dried meal at the end of the day and then next morning do the same for boiled water and breakfast so my idea is that both at end of day and in the morning at both times, fill an decent insulated bottle up to save gas and effort prehaps so you have hot water in the insulated bottle plus you will not need to boil water again.

    What is your take on this despite pack size weight and how long it would keep the water warm in insulated bottle.

    I had a look at this and seems to be the daddy of insulated bottles and yes it is weighty and bulky but yea https://www.kleankanteen.co.uk/products/insulated-tkpro-32oz-1000ml?variant=12569959497802 apparently 38 hours hot and 100 hour cold so i hope that isn't rubbish, plus if any of you has any experience with insulated bottles let me know.

    So yea while on the move and you fancy a drink or put hot water in freeze dried food will save time and effort plus no need to dig out the rucksack.

    As the moderator said regarding use of equipment and the likely hood of if you would ever use it.

    If i did not have a insulated bottle i most certainly would have just 1 cup of coffee during the whole day because you would have your tent up and equipment set up so you would have a cup of coffee because it is convenient.

    Dan.
     
    #75 Lltfdaniel, Oct 22, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2019
  16. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I prepare my coffee and tea with boiling, not hot water.
    So you need to make it ‘ready to drink’ and keep it in the insulated bottle.
    Do you trust those claims?

    It will not save any fuel to “pre heat” and store in an insulated bottle.

    Not saving time either, but concentrating the time spent into fewer ‘ ‘boiling sessions’.

    I like stopping and making a brew. You catch your breath, rest those muscles, gives you time to change the socks, go for a pee, watch the nature....
     
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  17. Lltfdaniel

    Lltfdaniel Member

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    Do i trust those claims well both yes and no because i do not know regarding the temperature and how hot the liquid would be first hand over time.

    Yes since i am confused it does mean fewer boiling sessions and yea does not save gas but yeah.

    Well it vary's and well if you prefer to save money you would forget about the insulated bottle despite many makes and models where it would not cost a bomb though but yeah with varying prices and or if you don't mind having to boil water every time.

    Don't know what to think really, some claims can be misleading.

    Just reading reviews of it to get an idea.

    Dan.
     
    #77 Lltfdaniel, Oct 22, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2019
  18. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    An insulated water bottle is crucial when you spend time outdoors in heavy sub zero temps. Not so much to keep water close to boiling, but to keep it liquid.

    I suspect you can buy a cheaper insulated bottle with very similar prestanda.

    One technology that I have not seen for ages is the (usually) Chinese made vacuum glass bottles, with a gaily painted, corrugated outer protection .

    Those were fantastic, but fragile. I think they had a production line aimed solely at me over there...
    :)
     
    #78 Janne, Oct 22, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2019
  19. Lltfdaniel

    Lltfdaniel Member

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    Well i am glad i done research on reviews, actually there is a better insulated bottle and is cheaper than the klean canteen apparently from one review video.

    For the money this is a better bet https://sigg.com/uk/thermo-flasks/ .

    The things going for sigg thermal flask is affordable does a much better job at the price point to keep things cool or hot, the claim of what it is rated as is pretty much spot on regarding how many hours to keep it hot or cold.

    Anyways take that with a pinch of salt...

    https://outdoorsmagic.com/article/best-thermos-flasks-reviewed/#eRMTU00SY4sKAH2l.97
     
    #79 Lltfdaniel, Oct 22, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2019
  20. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Some years ago, when I was in a 'DIY' stage, I created an insulating bottle from two plastic drinks bottles, and sprayed expanding insulation in between.
    The inner bottle was from a heat resistant plastic.
    ( the first version was not, the inner bottle got damaged by boiling water)
    Works well.

    Sigg bottles were the best. Made in Switzerland. I still own a couple, one green I was issued, and a couple of bright red. Of course, the rubber seals need to be replaced sometimes, more often on the fuel bottle. Dents, but does not crack. Not insulating though.
    They were expensive, but worth every coin!

    I am sure they have expanded the range these days, everybody seems to go that route.
     
    #80 Janne, Oct 22, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2019
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