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What gear would you take with you thread and why.

Discussion in 'Kit Chatter' started by Lltfdaniel, Oct 17, 2019.

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  1. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Dan, those collapsible items look fantastic, but they might be quite heavy.
    Now, being old, grumpy and set in the 1960’s ways, I still think a Trangia set is the best you can get for the weight and volume.
    Even if you are alone, the Trangia 25 is perfect
    If I was buying one today I would get the 25-1- UL.Under 900 grams in total.
    I prefer the Alcohol burner before the gas canisters.

    If you run out of alkohol you can use the system over a small fire.
     
    Bishop likes this.
  2. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Yes I agree. A lot of what you want to take is mainly for those who drive to a campsite and stay put. A lightweight trangia kettle is all you need to heat water... or you could just take a stainless steel Billy pot with lid and you could both boil the water for your hot drinks and cook dried meals or heat the ready prepared meals in pouches and do your drink at the same time saving fuel and time. 1 pot for everything and a small frying pan for those times you want bacon and eggs. Titanium is expensive but light and bullet proof pretty much. Think about an army style water bottle and mug/pot. The bottle fits into the mug/pot and you can do almost every meal with that set up. Sorry can't post a link but I'm sure someone else can if you don't know what I'm on about.
    I'm out this evening but tomorrow I'll try post a picture of what I would take on such a trip as you propose.
    Have a look at Paul kirtly on you tube. He has a lot of good tips on kit and packing stuff.
     
    Janne likes this.
  3. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Your water filter is expensive and over the top in my opinion (just my opinion ) I use a water to go bottle for keeping hydrated as I'm going along. It can be filled up from any water source.. even dirty puddles and will give you clean water at all times. Other than that I have a pocket water filter, I forget the brand but it's the same one Mr ray mears uses and I also have a millbank bag and water purifying tablets. This takes up little room and is very light too. All cost under £20.
     
  4. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    W. Girl is correct.
    You can pare down the cooking equipment lots, if you learn to cook wisely.
    Boil water, pour some in a cup and make a beverage, then cook food with rest.

    One pot, one cup.

    I personally have never used a water filter, only water purification tablets.
    Even in East Sussex.
    Think before you buy, ask here for opinion ( some very knowledgable people on UK climactic bushcrafting) then buy the best you can afford.
    The less you carry, the nicer experience.
     
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  5. Lltfdaniel

    Lltfdaniel Member

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    I haven't heard of trangia as janne has recommended had a look at their website and i think this brand is decent.

    I am contemplating whether to use a mess tin or pot or sauce pan because i want one that will be big enough to cook my ration pack.

    As for the collapsible gear... i agree the actual diameter is the same compact or not compact and well i am going to take that chance and if i get any problems like leaks i will never buy them again, ever.

    The reason why i want collapsible gear is because of pack size, i can have a kettle and pot and drinking mug side by side, where if it was un compact it would have to be like well one on top another for instance.

    I know the water filter is well expensive yeah very expensive but me being me i want a decent one but people who read or post here would recommend or not but yeah and yes it is more then necessary regarding cost and actual pack size and could do just as well with a cheaper alternative to this water filter.

    Anyways if the collapsible gear leaks or whatever i will be going for trangia cooking gear because they seem like a reputable brand.

    Yea can do away without a kettle and just use a pot for hot drink.

    Dan.
     
    #25 Lltfdaniel, Oct 19, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2019
  6. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

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    The fact you haven’t heard of Trangia is enough for me to leave you to it. Best of luck.
     
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  7. Lltfdaniel

    Lltfdaniel Member

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    Thanks i have been researching and will research,

    Anyways with the collapsible gear i can have it all at the bottom of the bag while the wideness is vertical to take up the 32cm vertical space in the bag,

    If it was not compressed or collapsed it will waste space and take up a whole bag regarding diameter space and how much efficient it is in using the space for example.

    [​IMG]

    Regarding the 2nd picture one the gear is horizontal you see, one on top another, but yea i am aware their is kit that goes along with compactness like the kelly kettle like this below.

    [​IMG]
     
    #27 Lltfdaniel, Oct 19, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2019
  8. Bishop

    Bishop Full Member

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    Ah rucksack Tetris... It Will All Fit Dammit!!! :aarghh:
    As a rule of thumb things you may want in a hurry near the top of any bag. Rain gear, water, snacks, brew-kit, map & compass
     
  9. Lltfdaniel

    Lltfdaniel Member

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    Yep definitely rucksack tetris.

    I would put the gas canister on top as well as the stove, so i plan to have it as my cooking cutlery set as well as being organised so the first thing i would have on the very top would be my stove because the first thing i would do and need first would be on the top.

    As well as knife fork sweets whatever to use up the space efficiently.

    Dan.
     
  10. Bishop

    Bishop Full Member

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    Here's the small utility pouches that usually live on the hip belt of my 35L pack.

    DSC_0033.JPG
    One litre canteen+cup, folding multi fuel stove, bottle of meths, purification tablets, isotonic powders and poncho

    1.2L billy can plus roughly 2000 calories of food with plenty of space left over for coffee,milk and a stack of biscuits

    So for a quick pit-stop all I have to do is find a soft spot, sit on my hat, throw poncho over head if it's raining and everything is to hand to get a brew on. All without taking off my rucksack and digging around.

    DSC_0031.JPG
    Folding multi-fuel stove: twigs, meths, hexamine why carry gas when there is wood already there?
    £10 for the cup+canteen, folding stove £8-14 depending on size/version
     
  11. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Check out the weight of the collapsible gear, including the Kelly.
    Trangia has been around since mid 1920’s, issued to several armed forces.
    Ok, you are a total newbie. Do not get scared by our attitude, specially mine. We all started like you!

    The Kelly Kettle is a classic. I do not know the total volume or weight.
    I can sense it is not 100% suitable in snow though. I lack an alcohol burner. A Trangia one might fit?

    My recommendation is to you is to use the Search function, find some older equipment threads and read.
    Then get a really cheap ( borrow?) basic stuff, just the ultra bare basics, and camp in an organised camping close to home. Use a duvet for one night.
    Just so you know if you really want to sleep outside a house. Then do the same beside a footpath, without people around you.
    It may sound stupid, but some people just can not sleep alone, in nature. I know a few. Good guys, scared $hitless in the forest. Nothing to be ashamed of though! Some sounds scare me too.
    And I have been doing this for close to 55 years!

    Why do you not do a little presentation about you and your nature experience?

    One thing you should buy NOW.
    A knife. Start practicing with it. Whittle a bit, cut some food, stuff like that.
    Nothing fancy, a Stainless steel Mora knife.
    ( yes, here I go! :). )

    Edit: Kelly Kettle 1.2 liter Ultimate kit is about 3.44 lb, so 1.6 kilos.
    Translated to my lingo that is a Trangia kit plus 0.8 kilos of nuts, Toblerone and a bar of Lindt.
     
    #31 Janne, Oct 19, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2019
  12. snappingturtle

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    Ok dude you are way to heavy!
    boots? get the best you can you will be living in these! some thing good for hiking even mountain style as you will be grinding up an down slopes a lot! (use with trainer socks and a wool outer sock you get less blisters)

    45l pack with 2l bladder

    camp gear
    roll matt, sleeping bag, bivi bag, basha and lots of cord (this is light but has fair comfort also easy set up)

    cook gear
    pocket rocket, 2 gas cans, lighter, matches, ferro rod, 1 small pot for quick drinks one large for main food, spork, dry food, snacks (easy set up instant heat, don't mess about get cooking down to a simple and easy task)

    wet gear/wind breaker
    Top an bottoms don't skimp this is a life saver. I use a Berghaus alpine style top hard shell and water proof fast hike style bottoms with gaiters add at least wind proof gloves and hat to this plus a jumper, fleece or down jacket mid layer, highly breathable base, spare socks pants and a tee go without saying.

    head torch, pocket knife, gaffa tape and climbers finger tape, phone, map, compass, glow sticks first aid kit.

    Walk before you can run, know its ok to bale! better to come home early than not at all or risk others to save you.
     
    #32 snappingturtle, Oct 19, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2019
  13. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Best advice yet! .... don't forget the first aid kit though with plenty of blister plasters. Wear in your boots before you go with plenty of long walks even round town will be useful for this.
    If you want more protection than a bivvi bag and tarp take a trip to go outdoors and take some advice about a good tent that is suitable for hiking ..... other shops available.... and get a good tarp. DD 3x3m is the standard issue for most of us here. You can get an ultra light one if you want to save weight. These are great to pop over your tent and give added protection and dry working space. Also saves packing a wet tent up in the rain getting soaked while you do so.
    Learn to put up a tarp.
    Also take an emergency blanket. I put mine in the first aid kit.
    Also mosquito repellant.
    You still havnt said when you plan to go. Summer kit is different to winter kit. Spring and autumn is different again but it's usualy just a case of different sleeping bags mats and clothing .
     
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  14. snappingturtle

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    ^^ Thanks woody girl :) Agree about the need for the blister plasters! its why I take the climbers tape, ho and the gaffa is good for tears in your kit if things go bad good for tears in you :eek2:
     
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  15. Erbswurst

    Erbswurst Native

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    I gave you a link to a thread I wrote for beginners including low budget euipment, available when I wrote it.

    There you find for example a pot like the Trangia pots which costs next to nothing, but it is original military equipment.

    The stuff is tested by myself or used in armies for many years.

    I recommend to buy for example this and to get out in the woods instead of surching in the internet for stuff you can't understand without experiences.

    Your collapsible stuff is bullshit, my dear.
    The cup is totally useless and the pot and kettle are made for car- camping. On a wood fire you would burn it immediatly. And you never can be sure if your carried fuel will last till the end of your trip.

    It is less interesting, what you are able to carry. Every experienced person will tell you that he chooses the lightest equipment that is strong enough to do the job and that he is able to pay.

    A light rucksack means to have a nice tour.
    A heavy rucksack isn't very funny.

    The tent you showed us could be a good option, if you aren't to tall.

    How tall are you? Please in centimeters.

    In my opinion you should look in your house what equipment you still have. Than you should write it in a list, pretty similar to the stuff I recommended in the Low Budget Equipment thread, and to put every single item on your kitchen skales.
    Write the weight of every single item behind it in the list.

    Write the stuff from my thread in your list if you don't own something similar.

    Try to get all the stuff in your Rucksack and double check if the weight of the full rucksack is identic with the addition off all the weights of the list.

    Than you can post it here and we can tell you, what we think about it.


    Here you have the link to the stuff I recommend to beginners ones more:

    https://bushcraftuk.com/community/index.php?threads/low-budget-equipment-2019.152469/
     
    #35 Erbswurst, Oct 19, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
  16. Erbswurst

    Erbswurst Native

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  17. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    To get blisters is bad. Imperative to have properly fitting and broken in footwear, a sock system, and seasoned feet.
    A blister can turn septic, even cause blood poisoning.
    I got that in -82, after the Nijmegen 4 day March, my feet were unused to walking in tarmac.

    I second the recommendation to do a course. Mr Kirtley seems not only knowledgeable but also a nice friendly person!
    Check him out on Youtubr.
     
    #37 Janne, Oct 20, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
  18. Wander

    Wander Nomad

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    Don't do it, Dan.
    Not yet.

    You sound woefully inexperienced and ill prepared.
    You mention mental health, and you're absolutely right that physical exercise, activity, and green spaces are good for one's mental well being (I'm sure a good number of us could attest to that).

    So I fully applaud your intention to get out and experienced the world.

    However, you live in a beautiful part of the UK and you will get much valued experience, not to mention a sense of calm and relaxation, by exploring your local environment first.
    Actually, I would recommend that to everyone - connect with your local landscape first. It is always tempting to think that what's over the hill is more exotic. But that's only the product of a limited imagination. The more you look the more you will find.
    Someone has already mentioned the New Forest. But you also have the Dorset Ridgeway (somewhere I've never been and one day will). Why not walk that? It's about 20 miles. That way you can see if your pack is too heavy or manageable, and you can camp out halfway and get that kind of experience as well. That'd make a cracking weekend away. Especially to start with.
    Then when you've got a few more weekends under your belt, know your kit and needs better, you can head off to the wilder parts.
    But I would strongly urge against it just yet.
    You don't need to go far to find the wild, it truly is all around you. Embrace that.
     
  19. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Wander is right. I've already said do local stuff first and get some experience , refine your kit and get used to using it before setting out for the Scottish wilds.
    It's a long way from home and safety if things go wrong. Unless you are knowledgeable about coping with weather out on the hills that can be a big problem.
    100% get local experience before setting out on your adventure.
    You ask for our opinion on your gear and we say your cooking pans are unsuitable but you still want to take them. Seriously if you ask for advice ... then take it. If those collapseable pans were suitable we'd all be using them.
     
    #39 Woody girl, Oct 20, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
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  20. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    And - to make a fire is easy with nice dry materials, but can be ( for an inexperienced person) extremely difficult.
    So a Trangia or another system using a liquid or gaseous fuel is better than the ( in experienced hands wonderful) Kelly Kettle.

    It is no fun being in the wild nature and having to crunch uncooked dehydrated stuff.
     
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