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vegetarian

Discussion in 'Bushcraft Chatter' started by ickyan, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. hog

    hog Native

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    Soylent Green is people.
     
  2. Northern Giant UK

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    True, And probably not so nice in cofee. . but probably nice n thick tho:)

    Hmmn wonder what the cheese would be like (just grossed meself out there:()

    Seroiusly tho I'm not a veggy but I do like quorn, although I do remember it a few years ago and it seemed to taste like mould but it's really improved over the years and apart from the texture I think the taste is every bit as good as chicken.
    Just my 10p's worth.

    Kev
     
  3. Celt_Ginger

    Celt_Ginger Native

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    Mmmmm, Tofu or a Bacon Sandwich? Let me think about that one....................for a milisecond.
    Bacon sandwich please!!
     
  4. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Nah, I think we have to agree to disagree on that one :D

    Himself likes a bacon roll occasionally. The kids nicknamed it a 'deadpig bun' many years ago :D

    cheers,
    Toddy
     
  5. Tengu

    Tengu Full Member

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    Theres lots of perfectly sensible arguments against dairy but a lot of traditional societies rely on it, and have done so for a long time.
     
  6. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    And that is a perfectly sensible reason to be a vegetarian.

    I happily eat both omnivorous and vegetarian cuisine, but I'm less convinced by animal welfare arguments as a reason to be vegetarian. Having lived on many farms, I tend to find that fields used for raising vegetables and grains are sterile monoculture areas supporting very little in the way of insect or higher life forms. Good pasture however supports abundant insect, bird and mammal life forms. So, as a person who likes to see wildlife, I can see very good reasons for grazing land (which is only there to raise animals).

    That said, its a choice for the individual and not for me to say who should eat what

    Red
     
  7. FGYT

    FGYT Maker

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    yep i havea mate who is Vegi for that reason and is loves to go out rabbit shooting :D

    ATB


    Duncan
     
  8. hermitical

    hermitical Forager

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    Permaculture is a good way around that
     
  9. mochasidamo

    mochasidamo Member

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    Quite so. Look at the mess the poor bees are in. Then think long and hard.
     
  10. A.Gronow

    A.Gronow Member

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    Are there any left in the UK?
     
  11. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Agreed - but you then hit yield limits, economies of collection and distribution and food security. Now for me, I agree with local food, non intensively raised (animal or vegetable). Sadly it is less mechanised, less intensive, inherently more complex and therefor costly. We have a population already too large for us to feed who expect cheap food.

    No simple answers I fear
     
  12. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Yeah, I agree.
    However;
    when I was little every house around had a big garden. This wasn't just an outside playground, but it was actively cultivated land. Everybody grew something, took a kind of pride in it too, and the occasional glut was passed around or turned into jam and chutney. Nowadays folks pave it over, park cars, build patios and decks on the garden lands.
    It's amazing though how much food one small garden can produce.

    The only real problems are finding enough land to grow grain. Oats and barley thrive in our cool damp climate but they're a lot of work to process.
    They could be grown, stooked and dried, bunched into sheafs, and those unworked sheafs given in small bunches to hens though. They'd thrive and give eggs. Still need to obtain enough flour for human needs though.

    I think the answer is that there is no one answer. I do think raising awareness of just where and how our food comes about is no bad thing.

    cheers,
    Toddy
     
  13. gregorach

    gregorach Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Don't forget the malt! Without malt, civilisation - nay, survival - is meaningless! :D

    More seriously though, I'd be really curious to get some idea of what the total agricultural yield of some of those empty barren glens was, pre-clearances.
     
  14. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    I did some research on that when I was at Uni.
    The answer is that they were anything but barren.

    Our modern concept is that agriculture is done in fields. When you don't have huge sheets of arable land, pockets of the best land, in full sun and with good water in a sheltered bit, worked with the old caschrom, provide amply for the population.
    They only really suffered starvation when they took to relying too heavily on the potato as main crop.

    cheers,
    Toddy
     
  15. locum76

    locum76 Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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  16. william#

    william# Settler

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    was a full time vege for 7 yrs then lapsed into mindless consumtion of anything for years

    returned to a pure vege a few years ago that lasted about a 10mth peroiod was good to again be really aware of what i was eating and also dropped a lot of flab i was begining to put on.

    but again lapsed into eating meat , but tbh i decided sometime ago that i will now eat most of my meals pure vege but will not worry if i eat meat - i feel better for that decission and gives me the freedom to eat what i like esspecially when im under canvas.

    i have no problems with animals being killed as long as its for good reason and as humane as possible.

    i do like bill bailys take on vege s

    he says "im a vege, but i eat fish , and oh yes duck as they are praticly fish anyway oh and pigs cows and sheep in fact anything that lives near water".
    "im a post modern vege i eat meat ironicly"



    i applaude anyone who is a vege and i hate this vege bashing that goes on it is very discrimitary,small minded and rather gross its an assumtion by some that a vege is lacking in some way - well they may be lacking but its not because they are a vege some of the fittest triathletes ive met and known have been full time vegetarian for years and they are tough

    - and lets not forget the finest liquid vege meal enjoyed around many campfires - beer

    lol
     
    #156 william#, Mar 18, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2010
  17. Tengu

    Tengu Full Member

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    Yes, but think how much grain that could be fed to cows it uses up.

    Toddy. I was wondering about the productivity of pre clearance land too.

    North Rona (333 acres of seriously windswept nastiness) supported 30 people.

    They died in a famine, so say, others say plague.

    I suspect it might have been both. they had no trouble feeding themselves normally, and must have had a boat (No peat! turf soaked in whale oil for fuel!!)

    The land is good turf, retains water well, and lots of nice grazing...its a tough enviroment, but I noted that the plants which did grow there certainly thrived.

    Even if you had no crops you would have scurvy grass, nettles, seaweeds, shelfish, birds and sea mammals to eat...on top of your herds and flocks.

    it would be interesting to find out what variety of crops they did grow (oats, rye and barley...this was before taters) they must have been extreemly hardy!!

    much lazybeds in evidence.
     
  18. A.Gronow

    A.Gronow Member

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    Unfortunately most beer, at least brewed in the UK uses isinglass in the clarification process. Most German beers are fine. Hic!
     
  19. gregorach

    gregorach Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Actually, many (most?) commercial beers these days use filtration, because it's quicker and cheaper. Cask conditioned "real ales" commonly use isinglass or gelatin though. Without investigating the specific beer in question, it's impossible to say without a "suitable for vegetarians" label. However, you can't necessarily assume that the absence of such a label means that it isn't. Although I'm sure most veggies would prefer to err on the side of caution.
     
  20. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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