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Tutorial Repeat: Waxed leather drinking flask.

Discussion in 'DIY and Traditional crafts' started by Eric_Methven, Mar 3, 2014.

  1. Ciaopaddy

    Ciaopaddy Member

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    Amazing tutorial, many thanks for taking the time to do it. An ignoramus like me really appreciates seeing how this is done :)
     
  2. Hibrion

    Hibrion Maker

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    That looks great. I'm going to have to try this. Have you any idea how much wax I might need for the dipping method?
     
  3. janeleonard

    janeleonard Guest

    Love the tutorial. Probably one should be an expertise to some extent while trying these.
     
  4. Wuwuwu54

    Wuwuwu54 New Member

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    Just a quick question. How much do you sell these for?
    Thanks, Luke
     
  5. MT606

    MT606 Nomad

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    cracking tutorial, have saved it to my fav's and will give it a go soon, when I get enough wax together....where can you buy bulk amounts of wax from?
     
  6. Andy_K

    Andy_K Tenderfoot

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    Very nice!

    Now I know where to come when I want to get some "special" sheaths mad for my knives in future.
     
  7. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Very well written and illustrated tutorial.

    Find a bee-keeper. Our local one sells both honey and blocks of bee's wax (very clean, too) in the Farmer's Markets in the summers.
    I save the stumps of artisan hand crafted bee's wax candles. Melt into blocks in a hot water bath.

    My next wood carving project is a dish which needs to be particularly waterproof.
    Hoping to apply melted bee's wax to oven warm wood then back into the oven for a couple of minutes.
    So glad you've done that kind of thing. I don't believe that my dish will wrinkle.

    For years, I've used an oven heat treatment to put the oil finish on the kitchen prep tools = spoons and forks.
    It cannot be washed out.
     
  8. greensurfingbear

    greensurfingbear Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I've got a flask all made up and wet formed just haven't gotten around to waxing it......I don't have a double heater or anything big enough to put flask into that isn't a regularly used kitchen pan :(


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  9. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Eric, that is such a good tutorial :D :notworthy:

    Greensurfingbear, You can do it by using a cheap pan (£1 from poundstore) and a microwaveable jug or pot (£store again)

    What you need to do is put the pot on a worktop and line it and overline it with an opened up bin bag. That becomes your 'catch' area for the wax.
    You can't dip the whole piece with this method but you can pour and wipe the wax with this method.

    The wax goes into the microwave and is melted in bursts of power (£store again, buy a cheap set of stainless steel utensils) stirred (and it's easier if you grate the beeswax first, though Midfords sell pelleted wax very reasonably that makes life easy) and then spooned or poured over the warmed leather above the plastic covered pot. Run off mostly ends up in the pot and the splashes will cool on the plastic and can be flexed off and dropped into the catch pot too.

    It's a lot messier but for a £3 outlay and a bit of patience, it works and it cleans up tidily when it's all cooled.

    Don't try to do it without a plastic wax catch, over the sink…..I totally blocked the ubend doing that :eek: :eek:.
    HWMBLT still looks at me with concern when he sees me melting wax :rolleyes:

    Midfords…Ikg beeswax pellets, 12.90, delivered.
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Pure-Bees...Candle_SoapMaking_EH&var=&hash=item3a996f33f5

    M
     
  10. greensurfingbear

    greensurfingbear Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I tried the pouring wax method on a tankard I made.........didn't end well!


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  11. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Why ? It's just spoon the hot wax over it, let it drip off into the pot, buff up and then tidy up the wax splashes from the plastic sheet when it's all cool.

    We also use the oven to soak wax into courrans…..bit of wax inside the shoes and then pop them into a cool oven. The wax melts and soaks into the shoes. Just mind that it's a cool oven and not to cook the leather.

    You could go to the car boots and buy a big stock pot there for a few pounds, or an old jam making pan. I buy them for dyeing.
    Needs an awful lot of beeswax to fill one up though.

    M
     
  12. Ole Abner

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    That was a great bit of teaching! Thank you for taking the time to put it together.
     
  13. TheAkashicTraveller

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    This looks like a very interesting project. Is my assumption that the groover and stitch wheel are just for neatness, labour saving and reducing the chances of mucking it up correct? Leather work isn't something I've done before so, unless my local makerspace or similar has them, I'll be going with minimal tools for the time being.

    Would something like this be fine for the holes? https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01FW19...lid=1QJL7ORFJV7PB&coliid=I2NO86LCSLDTP1&psc=1
     
  14. TheAkashicTraveller

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    It looks like you ran out of free hosting on photobucket.
     
    ejsilver26 likes this.

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