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The load out- a guide and example (pic heavy)

Discussion in 'Kit Chatter' started by Wilderbeast, Aug 18, 2010.

  1. Shovel

    Shovel Forager

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    I just use a penny stove. I payed no money for it, and denatured alcohol is really cheap. I don't bother with lighters. My fire kit is an altoids tin containing cotton balls, dryer lint, Swedish Firesteel, matches, slivers of fatwood, and some birthday candles. I also carry a UCO nine hour candle with me. A UCO candle lantern is a luxury but very useful.
     
  2. hog

    hog Native

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    Thanks for that, always good to see what others are carrying.
     
  3. nmdbase

    nmdbase Member

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    Great thread, it'll make getting my kit sorted much easier. Thanks :)
     
  4. JonnyT

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    I've found this really helpful, thank you.

    Being a total noob I was just carrying way too much stuff that I didn't need.
     
  5. Descant

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    Helpful thread, cheers.
    Will hopefully start to acquire a similar kit
     
  6. The Survivor

    The Survivor Nomad

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    Very usefull, thanks....
     
  7. leedsbrew

    leedsbrew Forager

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    This is exactly the thread I was looking for! Thanks!
     
  8. ozzy1977

    ozzy1977 Full Member

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    Paul Kirtley's blog is well worth a read
     
  9. lostplanet

    lostplanet Full Member

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    Bump, as its a good thread.
     
  10. bopdude

    bopdude Full Member

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    Have another bump well a selfish bump on my part so I can find this thread when I'm at my pc and not on the phone, as an over packer myself I'm looking forward to more tips, thanks for sharing

    Sent from my GT-N7105 using Tapatalk
     
  11. BlueTrain

    BlueTrain New Member

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    I like the gear that others have pictured here. I wonder how much they have changed over the years. In my case, the major items haven't changed in thirty years. Still use the same tent, same sleeping bag, same stoves, and usually the same cookware. The packs have varied, chiefly because I have more than one and I just like the experience of using a different pack. None are at all lightweight, however. Comfort in carrying them easily outweighs actual weight. Of all the packs, the one with the greatest capacity, even though it's the heaviest, is a PLCE rucksack. It's the most comfortable, too. My US Army mountain rucksack made in 1942 is probably the second most comfortable and will carry the biggest load after the PLCE rucksack, although it's a little harder to pack. So basically, either I'm hopelessly old-fashioned or we haven't progressed as far as we think; probably the former. A rucksack with a waistbelt (been around since before WWI, too) makes me feel like I'm tied up and usually, the weight is way too high for balance. In the places where I mostly go, a cord is considered essential for suspending your food from a tree at night. But I don't use "para cord," which seems to be everyone's solution to earthquakes and terrorist attacks. Instead, I use plain white nylon cord. It doesn't "run" when wet and it's easier to see at night. I must have a dozen knives but of all the things I usually bring along, a knife gets less use than almost anything. Needless to say, I never have an axe. But everything evolves. I wonder what "Nessmuk" would think of these lists?
     
  12. rg598

    rg598 Native

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  13. weekender

    weekender Full Member

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    Great thread with great tips and ideas..


    Sent from the smoke clouds of a poorly lit fire...
     
  14. bushcraftkid2001

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    Most helpful thread ever!!!!!
     
  15. Xylophile

    Xylophile Tenderfoot

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    this thread is fantastic cheers guys
     
  16. breff

    breff Full Member

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    Just found this thread and, as a total new starter, it's a light in the darkness for me!
    One query I do have is about water carrying. As part of the brain injuries I have "Diabetes Insipidus". It means that my body can't keep hold of water. I take Anti diuretic hormones that save me from TEH DETH but I need a LOT of water to replace what, ahem, leaves my body. In a normal day I would probably have to drink at least 5 litres of water, not including coffee and cooking water. Any suggestions how to carry the sort of volume I need for safety, without filling a trailer and towing it from my belt?
     
  17. Tigger004

    Tigger004 Member

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    Make sure you are near a source of water especially with your condition,
    I carry a few bits to filter water with, first off a milbank bag to pre filter then a mini sawyer filter. Pre filtering enables longer between flush back cleaning the sawyer,
    Keep distinct clean / dirty regime to prevent cross contamination,

    As long as my water source remains I have constant water and have drunk from some very questionable sources which were very smelly

    Good luck and post your own experiences, jeff

    Sent by Tigger from my Tablet
     
  18. Tigger004

    Tigger004 Member

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    Very good post, well laid out and equally well explained, thanks

    PS.
    It doesn't seem too heavy, I have spoilt a couple of my trips by over loading my back pack and making the hikes a chore,

    Sent by Tigger from my Tablet
     
  19. Geek

    Geek Full Member

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    Great post, I am always interested in seeing other people's kit / equipment. I spend hours on YouTube looking at equipment videos.
     
  20. Geek

    Geek Full Member

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    I have read somewhere, that it is best to balance the load in the two side pockets, therefore if tarp/sleep system on one side, what would you put on the other side? Then, whatever is in the side pockets now would need to be inside the pack.
     

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