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Survival Skills without camping?

Discussion in 'Bushcraft and survival skills' started by Blufor, Nov 27, 2019.

  1. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

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    I reckon you should go out for a walk, take something to sit on that’s waterproof. I’m just making up some old army towels attached to waxed cotton with pop studs or Velcro so I can sit down on something dry and mop myself or the dogs down. Have a fire kit, I recommend the Polymath Spitfire kit, it’s got everything, even a blower for £11.99.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Polymath-P...ocphy=9045777&hvtargid=pla-680275092627&psc=1

    Have a bottle of water, a pot, a fry pan, some bacon or chipolata sossies, a split buttered roll, a sachet of sauce. Get a little fire going, or take a take a small gas stove. Make tea or coffee, cook a bacon roll. Clear up nicely, wander home satisfied and enthused. :)
     
    Woody girl likes this.
  2. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Yes, Blufor, for some people, being cold is no fun.
    A large fire is not a good idea, despite what most people think.
    The reasons are: it takes time to find and gather enough wood to last.
    A large fire warms only the part of body facing the fire.
    So, your front is hot. Your back is cold.
    You need to take off or open the clothes in the front. Take off = your back will freeze even more.
    If you sweat - the worst situation, really. Then your clothes get moist, and the cold back gets even colder!

    A small ‘Saame style’ fire is only good enough to cook on, and warm your hands on.

    To be nicely warm, you need to dress properly. Layer.
    But not to much so you sweat. Adjust according to work load. Which means you take the various layers off and on several times a day.

    Warm feet is important.

    Even with a fantastic sleeping bag and underlay, you will be cold on your face, unless you are ok sleeping with a balaclava.
    Putting your head inside the bag is a bad option, as you will get more condensation inside the bag!
    Amount of clothes - same rule apply, too much - you sweat - bad, bad, bad!

    In warm climate like in UK you should be fine with a tarp and hammock system, in cold climate a tarp
    / hammock is just a fashion.

    A good, comfy way is to experiment in your ( or a friends ) back garden. Something is not to your liking - get indoors.

    Heater? Yes, you can get hand warmers fuelled with glowing carbon rods. They do not last the night out, around 4-5 hours, but one in the foot end and you sleep like a baby!
     
    #22 Janne, Nov 29, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2019
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  3. Blufor

    Blufor Member

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    I envy you, that sounds like the perfect existence, peaceful and calm, natural. I imagine one day when I'm an old fecker I'll be striving to live in a similar environment. But at 30, I've still got some juice in the tank to pursue adventure for alittle while longer hehe
     
  4. Blufor

    Blufor Member

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    Very encouraging words, thank you, I really only considered giving it a try again after watching another old episode of Ray Mears & Les Stroud, I admire their resilience and its a trait I feel is lacking in myself. Of course, we should all want to improve ourselves so that's why I'm here :)
     
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  5. Blufor

    Blufor Member

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    Cute bit of simple kit to do the basics with and have a play around, thanks alot man.
     
  6. Blufor

    Blufor Member

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    Yeh, this is very helpful, thanks alot. I will def have to do a little look into making sure my next camping trip is warm without overdoing it. Maybe next time I should only camp at the peak of the summer!
     
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  7. firedfromthecircus

    firedfromthecircus Tenderfoot

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    Camping in the height of summer has it's own challenges in terms of enjoyment. Heat, early sunrises/late sunsets, insects, etc, though it is probably easier to survive with less kit and experience than the darkest depths of winter.
    The point has been made that you don't have to camp to brush up or learn new skills. You can just go for a walk and practice 'bushcraft' in a suitable spot and get home in time for tea, or bed if you want to have your tea out. Once you have most of the skills in the locker you can go out for longer periods, and eventually you may both know enough, and want to stay out longer so sleeping out becomes inevitable. The trick to all of it being successful and 'easy' is down to admin and experience. That said, even with great admin, all the gear and plenty of experience camping suits some folk better than others.

    So at this point I have to disagree with oldtimers last sentence in the above quote. Sure, if you do it badly it is much more likely to be miserable, but even if you do it well, it can still be miserable! :roflmao:

    So yes, you can learn 'survival' without camping. In the event that you do ever have to 'survive' you will be amazed at how resilient you can be. Most people never know what they've got until they are challenged, but everything you can pick up beforehand will help. Just do it responsibly and leave no trace.
     
  8. Fadcode

    Fadcode Full Member

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    Set yourself a few targets....for example....
    learn the laws on camping, trespass, lighting fires, etc.
    make a fire, (if its legal)
    Read about trees
    pitch a tent.
    cook a meal,
    make yourself a cup of tea/coffee,
    and remember the most important piece of kit is inside your head.
    and build up your experiences slowly, and learn from your mistakes. and you will make mistakes, we all do.,
    then when you have a few under your belt, try an overnighter, but make it easy on yourself, try a camp site.
    And most of all, don't go spending buckets of money on gear, until you decide camping is for you, unless you have a large free space in your loft.
    I would suggest a days canoeing, taking with you a packed lunch and a flask.................that is so enjoyable that you will want more
    And if poss join a local group.
     
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  9. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    There is loads and loads of unnecessary equipment out there.


    Sleeping alone, in nature, can be daunting in the beginning. Strange sounds, imagination runs wild.
    I still get that, after close to 50 years.....

    I like tents. Creates a barrier between me and those massmurdering long toothed monsters!
    (plus keeps the wind and insects away as an extra bonus!)
    :)
     
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  10. Erbswurst

    Erbswurst Native

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    I can assure you, we aren't a sado-maso club!

    Some of us try out the limits and that is survival training.

    Survival means that you get in the situation in the woods, for example because your car breaks in the middle of nowhere, or even Norway :smuggrin: and you have to try to get out and reach the civilisation.
    Most of us would easily manage such a situation, but that isn't the main point why most of us are doing all that.

    Using the same techniques, we are doing the opposite of survival: We train to go into the woods and to live there comfortable!

    I am a very experienced bushcrafter and I did a lot of trekking and camping all my life, but in the last years I changed my clothing system from a traditional German old school boy scout system with leather knickerbockers and woolen and cotton clothing to a modern outdoor clothing layering system.

    You will be very surprised, where I mainly tried it out and used the time to think about it: I did it mainly at the bus stops and the main railway station of Colone!
    The railway station is located next to the Rhine, there it becomes very unpleasant if it is cold, the wind comes along the Rhine and the rails. Standing in this whet and windy weather on the platform under the cathedral and waiting for the train I looked up in my smartphone the current temperature, played with the zippers, putting parts of my new layering system on and off and concentrated in what I feel.

    In between I payed attention about my feeling on little or longer walks in the town.

    And after I understood exactly what's going on, I took that clothing equipment with me to test it in between 45*C in southern France during the days of the summer and minus 20*C in the nights of the north east German January in the open field around my brother farm.

    And now I know exactly which clothing I have to use in which situation and never get the problem that it becomes uncomfortable to me.

    Additional to that I use the in my opinion best military sleeping bag system that is currently available, the Snugpak Special Forces Sleeping bag System with its bivvy bag, of course in olive green, because I want to be invisible if I sleep in Forest and field. That system never becomes to cold or to hot in every European weather conditions except winters in northern Scandinavia and Russia, and even there it would work well if I would use additional warm clothing and my Hilleberg two persons tent Nallo 2 or if I would use my bushcraft know how and would heat a lean to poncho shelter with a long log fire.

    I wear custom made leather hiking boots, I own a trekking air mat for stony or frozen ground. All my other modern equipment is long lasting and durable but very very light, but most of it isn't especially expensive.

    I own the best stuff in the world but I usually let my most expensive stuff at home, because I don't really need it in most conditions.
    Military surplus stuff offers superior qualities but used at very low prices, and I use a lot of it.

    Equipped with stuff that works well at minus 20*C I feel very comfortable in normal soft winter conditions off course!

    :)
     
    #30 Erbswurst, Nov 29, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2019
  11. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Good bushcrafting is minimizing the Masochism as much as possible.

    You can start in your kitchen. Simple tasks like lighting a fire. Cooking in a can, using only an outdoor or workman knife. Only your imagination limits you!
     
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  12. TLM

    TLM Forager

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    "I can assure you, we aren't a sado-maso club!"
    Sorry the OT BUT: A few years ago I met the oddest sight halfway in the middle of nowhere in Lapland, a middle aged lady walking in Crocks with thick wool socks. In ankle deep water. Her back bag was about as badly adjusted as I have ever seen with things hanging every which way all over the poor thing. She said hello and continued somewhere. I think she did fit the definition for a masochist.
    Return to normal programming ...
     
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  13. Deekin

    Deekin Full Member

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    I used to go to European winter motorcycle rallys (-20)with my bike and sidecar, and a Honda quiet generator, and an electric blanket. Luxury.
     
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  14. Erbswurst

    Erbswurst Native

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    @TLM

    She probably was a member of the M.I.F.F.S.C ?

    (Meteorite Impact Flip Flop Survival Club.)

    :biggrin:


    In my opinion things like that happen because inexperienced idiots produce YouTube videos and stupid beginners write theyr opinions in internet forums.

    That's why I asked you to surch for educational films about the propper old school way to do hiking, trekking and bushcraft.

    There is far more idiotic stuff out in the internet than good advice how to do things correctly. And we see more and more wrong informed people running around.

    One of the reasons why that could happen is that most european armies stopped the common service and became professional forces. Nobody teaches people any more how to pack a rucksack for a week in the woods. The younger generation simply doesn't know that any more.
     
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  15. Trojan

    Trojan Silver Trader

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    As I was about to post very similar as above!
     
  16. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Did she speak English?
    :)

    Crocks are the invention of the devil. Real wooden clogs ( traa skor) invention of a Saint.
     
  17. TLM

    TLM Forager

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    From the few words she said I deduced her to be thoroughly Finnish.

    I use Crocks as camp shoes and for river crossings but that is exactly it.
     
  18. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    she must have lived a part of her life in Sweden, to turn that crazy.....:)

    Another skill you can learn at home, if you have an oldfashioned fire place, or even better, a garden, is to make small fires.
     
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  19. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

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    I thought the holes were there simply to drain ones dignity :D
     
  20. TLM

    TLM Forager

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    I very much agree with easy practise in the garden, make tea with your camping setup, make a small fire, put up the tent etc.

    Crocks are actually quite handy in river crossing, when you lose one it floats unlike most sandals, don't ask how I learned that.
     

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