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Survival... Indian time

Discussion in 'Bushcraft and survival skills' started by cariboo, Jan 19, 2020.

  1. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    With overlapping generations, there will always be elders to pass along such things as agricultural information.
    That has worked very well on the coast of British Columbia for the past 14,500 years,
    that we know of (Heiltsuk oral history, now confirmed by archaeology.).

    "Indian Time" is still prevalent here. The Neolithic has never been completely eradicated by the scourge of European influence.
    Culturally, it's so profoundly different and nice to see. My housekeeper is Haida. My gardener is Cree.

    If my land was a lot wetter/lower, I'd want to transplant our big ferns for the crozers, the fiddle heads in the spring.
    You only pick one or maybe 2 from each plant, acres of them. As they mature, we just go up in altitude where spring is later
    and the ferns are not so developed.
     
  2. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Cariboo: what did you do to yourself?
     
  3. cariboo

    cariboo Forager

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    Fractured 2 ribs.
     
  4. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    It hurts to breathe and rolling over in bed is just wishful thinking.
    My ribs never knitted back properly = they stick up at odd angles when I lie on my back.
    They "click" when I breathe but nobody hears it but me.
     
  5. cariboo

    cariboo Forager

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    I don't have any bones sticking up. That seems a bit harsh. Bones are still moving around.

    https://nationalpost.com/news/canad...hat-just-prompted-an-exoneration-from-trudeau
    Not that long ago like a 75 year old's great grandparents.

    It's breathtaking how shameless some politicians are.

    Another definition of "Indian time".

    Indigenous people, who represent about 5 per cent of Canada's population, now make up 30 per cent of the populations in federal prisons. Four years ago, the number was 25 per cent.
    (https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opi...ous-people-behind-bars-is-too-high-and-still/)
     
    #85 cariboo, Jan 26, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2020
  6. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Toddy: the atrocities, at least the indignities, are as recent as today or yesterday.

    Grandfather and Grand Daughter (Haida) went to the bank to open an account for the GD.
    The bank called the police, believing the pair were committing criminal fraud. Cuffed and interrogated.
    Natives get profiled and escorted out of stores before they buy anything.

    I'd hate to have to make excuse to explain these kinds of things to people from other countries.

    My gardener (Cree FN) also does a lot of my shopping. Store owners know he is LOADED with money.
     
  7. TLM

    TLM Nomad

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    We have a logical problem here in Fennoskandia, there are no sensibly defined indigenous people. The Sami claim it but there is no record of who was here 'first'. They just retained the hunter/gatherer way of life longer than other groups living here.
     
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  8. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I believe there is proof. DNA shows the earliesf inhabitants in northern Fennoscandia share the DNA with the people in Western Europe.

    Some interesting Archeology in those chilly European parts the last decade!

    It was the food rich coast they trekked on, but even in the inland part of the northernmost Sweden has archeology.

    I would rather have migrated south myself.
     
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  9. TLM

    TLM Nomad

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    On the fjords and other lime areas yes, here the acidic soil eats bones and DNA. But the Sami claim for indigenousnes is not really supported by any evidence.
     
  10. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Yes. They foundation tools plus remains of fires (I think) also.

    Indian Times. Are you allowed to say the ā€˜Iā€™ word?

    I practice Oldfashioned Times.

    Soon flying off to the Lofoten to harvest some Cod and preserve it for the year!
     
  11. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Here on the western side of the North American continent, the native people are called "First Nations."
    Everybody agrees that they came from Asia, got stuck on Beringia for 10,000 years.
    Eventually the glaciers of the ice age melted, sea levels rose as much as 100m.
    Three waves of immigration happened. The Heiltsuk oral tradition included a village site
    on the west coast which was excavated just a few years ago = 14,500 years BP.
    So there's a good approximation of some of the timing of human travels.

    As the flood of immigrants spread across both continents, the FN showed their versatility
    to adapt to local conditions of climate and soils. They were highly skilled when they got here.
     
  12. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I believe the thoughts are the various waves were if distinctly separate people?

    I find it amazing how the human ingenuity and ease of adopting have made it possible to survive from the driest deserts to the coldest Arctic.
    Evolving /changing slightly along the way.
     
  13. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    No matter who showed up and when, one fact remains:
    There are 4 different maternal lines of FN inheritance. Only four. Lots of small variations within each.
    mtDNA analysis strongly suggests that all natives in the Americas are the decendants of 4 different women.
    Broadly, they are labelled a, b, c & d. All the way south to Tierra del Fuego.

    Adaptations are genetic and might appear after thousands of years of selection pressure.
    What the First Nations display is remarkable versatility to take advantage of their surroundings.
    Consider the western red cedar of the west coast as a multipurpose plant.
    The equivalent on the east coast is the paper birch.
    Hard not to say dramatically different, edible plants show that same difference.
     
  14. TLM

    TLM Nomad

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    Don't forget epigenetics as an adaptive fenomenon. Humans are quite an adaptive lot.
     
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  15. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    The indigenous people in the Tierra Fuego area, they are a bit different I remember vaguely?
    Similar DNA to the Australians?
     
  16. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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  17. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I guess Beringia was a nice place to stop at, just as Diggerland.

    One interesting train the Tierra Fugians (?) have is the cold resistance.

    Similar to Greenlanders. Adoption.

    Unfortunately I have inherited some of this trait somehow from somebody.
     
  18. TLM

    TLM Nomad

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    The Esqimaux live in subtropics except face and hands. Yep, I think the Souther Tippers are the most cold hardy people.
     
  19. Tengu

    Tengu Full Member

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    If these people are commiting crimes, they should be treated like anyone else.

    You might as well complain about the elderly in GB jails.

    (I suspect the real problem is lack of education)
     
  20. forrestdweller

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    maybe they've dug up some older remains by now but a few years i read an article according to which the oldest human remains in the americas were found in brazil -- about 13.000 y.o. , facial reconstruction showed them looking similar to the guardians of God's own country (a.k.a. "Australia"). there also people in india with dark skin and similar physical appearance to Aborigines -- my guess is that some of the ancestors of today's Aborigines took a turn north towards the Bering straight and from there to america instead of southeast towards the promised land...

    Australia has been settled in waves, too: Tasmanian Aborigines had rather dark skin despite living ways down South (Tasmania was the southern-most settled place during the last ice age) but lacked spear throwers, boomerangs, dingos(reached the country of all countries ca. 6000years ago from asia) as those didn't reach the mainland of Oz before Tasmania got cut of by rising sea levels 12.000years ago...


    added: yes... i'm a big fan of the land down under... happy Australia Day!
     
    #100 forrestdweller, Jan 27, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2020
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