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Potential articles

Discussion in 'Other Chatter' started by Dave Budd, Dec 10, 2018.

  1. Dave Budd

    Dave Budd Gold Trader
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    As I hope you will have all noticed, I've started writing again :) Tony asked me to contribute some articles to the forum and I've found that as I've not written much over the last few years, I seem to have lost my inspiration a bit :( I'm sure once the creative juices start to flow again and you'll not be able to shut me up.

    In the meantime, I figured the best way to get ideas would be to ask the people who will be reading the articles! I don't really consider myself a bushcrafter. Rather, most of my day to day life seems to encompass a lot of things that can be considered bushcraft related.

    For those that don't know me or what I may be able to contribute, here is a little about what I do.

    Primarily I make my living from making knives and tools, with some teaching of those skills on the side. The knives I make are varied and generally forged from carbon steel, with everything from small chip carving blades to parangs as well as kitchen knives and some folders; the only type of knife that I don't make is the 'scandi ground bushcraft knife'. The tools I make cover pretty much every craft you can think of (assuming that I have been asked to make it so far). Obviously I make a lot of wood carving tools (woodcraft is very popular these days and very bushcrafty too) so that ranges from the familiar spoon hooks, gouges, drawknives, carving axes and adzes, right through to more specialised tools like twybils, stock knives and broad axes. I also make tools for other crafts that people here enjoy; including leatherworking, basketry, boneworking and hideworking.

    In recent years I've been making more and more for the living history community, so that when portraying ancient craftspeople they can be using period correct tools that actually work. This has led me to making a ridiculously wide range of tools that people don't see these days and it's ever growing (in the last couple of months I've added kit for maille making and stone masonry to my repertoire). Most tools haven't changed much in 2000 years.

    Aside from the things that I make to sell, maybe the place or process might provide some leads?

    My main workshop is off grid, powered by solar and a pto driven generator run by my tractor. The main workshop has most modern equipment that you could ever want (I like my toys!), but I do an awful lot by hand because it is often easier with my power constraints. I also have an outdoor workshop, where I teach groups of people. The outdoor workshop is an open sided structure with bellows driven Roman/Saxon style forges, vices, shave horses and that sort of thing for green woodwork and forgework. The outdoor workshop has no power and can be set up for archaeological groups that I teach on occasion, what with my background being as an archaeologist and latest training (15 years ago now) being an MA in Experimental Archaeology.

    The workshops are set within 10 acres of deciduous woodland, which I of course have to manage. The woods is mostly oak and hazel, but I have lots of other native flora and fauna in there and I try and use as much of it as I can. I mill larger trees into planks with a chainsaw mill, that later get turned into thing that I make, I turn the thinnings and some coppiced material into charcoal (in a full sized ring kiln and oil drums) which I then burn in my forges.

    I don't demonstrate at many shows these days, but some of you will have seen me at the Moot and the Wilderness Gathering with very simple forges (it always used to be a hole in the ground) and little in the way of tools.


    So, what sort of things would you lot like me to write about? :D
     
    Toddy likes this.
  2. Mesquite

    Mesquite Anyone for sailing?

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    Top of my head articles on iron age techniques and tools. your experiences of spear making, life in your woods, tour of your workshops, tools you use for making and fitting tang handles, pattern welding, skills and materials that have been lost would be interesting
     
  3. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    You could write about the more unusual edged tools/tools you have made and their use.
     
  4. Dave Budd

    Dave Budd Gold Trader
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    Some good ideas there, thanks :)

    I'll see what I am working on over the next couple of weeks and write around that, I think I've got some stick tangs to handle and if I have a tidy up I could do with taking some workshop pictures (tidy up is maybe an exaggeration, more like clear a couple of benches and move any obvious H&S issues from view!)
     
  5. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Freehand sharpening. It's one thing to buy an item of your bladesmithing and quite another to sustain
    a carving sharp edge, day after day. Some carvers bemoan the time spent on edges, I don't.
    It's a skill that encompasses every edge in the house. I take satisfaction in being good at it.
     
  6. Wayland

    Wayland Hárbarðr

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    I'd be interested in something about hardening and tempering in a simple forge. ( ie. No high tech temperature controlled equipment. )
     
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  7. Broch

    Broch Full Member

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    For me:

    - basic tool sets to get going without paying a fortune
    - construction of a simple forge for amateur use
    - alternatives to buying a £600+ anvil
    - a series on basic techniques - so not a specific project but how to do things such as put a twist in a bar, scroll the end of a piece of bar etc.

    Sorry if that's all a bit simplistic but it's what I need to get me going instead of talking about getting going :)
     
  8. Dave Budd

    Dave Budd Gold Trader
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    lots of food for thought there, thanks folks.
     
  9. Wayne

    Wayne BCUK Welfare Officer
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    A review of your mini tractor.

    A description of the basic knife lacking tools necessary for a beginner hobbyist. What to avoid etc.
     
  10. Buckshot

    Buckshot Mod
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    how to grind a bevel in a controlled and consistent way
    when i tried it, all i could sort was by eye - which is not controlled or consistent!
     
  11. Dave Budd

    Dave Budd Gold Trader
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    haha. I do all of my grinding freehand; control and consistency are a result of practice ;) . Jigs and guides are crutches that some of us don't feel the need for :singing: There are a few things that I use an angled platform for (hollow grinding grinding accurate bevels on chisels, plain irons and the like for sale), but even that takes longer to set up than it does to grind one chisel so only makes sense if I'm working in batches.
     

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