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North American arrowheads

Discussion in 'Bushcraft and survival skills' started by Riven, Sep 4, 2019.

  1. Riven

    Riven Full Member

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    IMG_2664.JPG These have just come into my possession and where found by my father 50 years ago whilst working in West Virginia for a few months. He died a long time ago and all I know is that he found them in the fields of a farm he was invited to shoot on.
    They really peaked my interest as a kid and would like to find out more about them, who made them and how long ago.
    So any ideas?
    Riven.
     
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  2. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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  3. bobnewboy

    bobnewboy Settler

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    I would suggest that you post your photo on the forum at Primitive Archer. They are an American based forum and very friendly and helpful. They still support the many people who like to make, collect and use flint etc arrowheads.

    See http://www.primitivearcher.com/smf/index.php

    Cheers, Bob
     
  4. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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  5. Riven

    Riven Full Member

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    Thanks guys, it's a shame they can't talk. What a history they have had.
     
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  6. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Made before, or in the century after, the Columbian exchange.

    As they have been removed from the area where they rested, the archeology is lost.

    Still, interesting and cool finds! So much skill has been used!
     
  7. Le Loup

    Le Loup Nomad

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    The best I can guess at Riven, is that these are pre mid 18th century, & they are woodland Indian arrow heads. During the fur trade era the natives often used to cut up brass trade kettles to make arrow heads & jewelry, it was far easier than knapping flint.
    [​IMG]
    Trade kettle arrow head.
    [​IMG]
    My copy of an 18th century brass trade kettle.

    Arrow Head Forum: https://forums.arrowheads.com/ Might be worth taking a look at.
    Regards, Keith.
     
  8. Trojan

    Trojan Silver Trader

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    Do you know where in West Virginia he found them?
     
  9. Riven

    Riven Full Member

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    Charleston is all I have to go on. My father went over with a mining safety company to the coalfields.
     
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  10. Tengu

    Tengu Full Member

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    They are pretty rough compared to Neolithic arrowheads.

    But still, they were disposable.
     
  11. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    The ARE Neolithic arrowheads.....
    :)

    Function before beauty?
     
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  12. snappingturtle

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    Middle top would make a fine necklace!
     
  13. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Technically they ARE Neolithic.
     
  14. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Maybe.
    I'm with Tengu on this though; those don't look skillful/tidy/fine worked enough to be Neolithic, iimmc.
    Some of them honestly look more like a modern practice sort of pieces.

    Numbered from left to right, and row one and two following from top down, No.1 looks awfully 'thick' like it's a crude flake, No.10 looks more like a core, while No.8 is a most uneven looking barb and tanged arrowhead...and it's the only one, as is the long flake blade, No.6....usually from the same area and the same culture, similar styles are found, even for differing purposes.
    It's an odd assemblage is what I'm trying to explain.
    Different culture and material to ours though.

    Be good if Dave saw this, he's good at spotting knapping stuff.
     
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  15. crosslandkelly

    crosslandkelly A somewhat settled

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    Could it be that they have been damaged and or degraded over the years they were on the ground?
    I made this one a couple of years ago at the moot.
    IMG_20200114_222026.jpg
     
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  16. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    That’s the irony of it isn’t it? They were a much more recent people with the more primitive technique. Although crosslandkelly may have a point too. Many of these are found when plowing and there’s no telling how many times they were struck by plows over the years before somebody picked them up.
     
    #17 santaman2000, Jan 15, 2020 at 1:27 AM
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2020 at 5:06 AM
  17. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Plough struck causes recognisible damage, and those little arrowheads aren't really likely to be hit with the plough. Unlike pottery or fine metal, the soil heave doesn't abrade them much since they're really hard stone, and they don't crumple like the metal. Usually arrowheads were damaged when they struck something. They do shatter on occasion if they hit bone, or a miss and hit rock, etc., Not saying it doesn't happen, but on the whole flint shards, flakes, and tools come out of the ground looking pretty much as they did when they went in.

    M
     
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