1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Knots for tightening Tarp Ridgerope

Discussion in 'Bushcraft and survival skills' started by wanderinstar, Jul 17, 2005.

  1. wanderinstar

    wanderinstar On a new journey

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2005
    Messages:
    1,346
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Yorkshire/Lancs Border
    What sort of knot do you use to tighten the ridgerope with. I have Rays book and have mastered the Evenk figure of eight hitch, but the other end eludes me.
    Help someone. Please.
    Ian.
     
  2. arctic hobo

    arctic hobo Native

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Messages:
    1,630
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Devon *sigh*
    I just put in an overhand loop, pass the bitter end around the tree and do a round turn through the loop. Then you can pull it tight (on a smooth tree anyway) with 2:1 purchase, and the bark friction and round turn hold it taut enough to make two half-hitches and a locking turn to secure it. I'm not sure how much sense this makes in text! If it's none, shout and I'll put some piccies up this evening.
     
  3. wanderinstar

    wanderinstar On a new journey

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2005
    Messages:
    1,346
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Yorkshire/Lancs Border
    Cheers Hobo,
    Piccies would be easier to understand [hopefully]
    Ian
     
  4. mojofilter

    mojofilter Nomad

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Messages:
    496
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    bonnie scotland
    I use the truckers hitch for anything that needs tensioned, cant find a good illustration at the moment. Sounds pretty much like hobo is saying.
     
  5. mojofilter

    mojofilter Nomad

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Messages:
    496
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    bonnie scotland
  6. spamel

    spamel Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2005
    Messages:
    6,833
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Silkstone, Blighty!
    Which book are you looking in? I've got essential bushcraft in front of me and the 'Tarp Taut Hitch' on page 137 is the knot I use at the second end. It looks pretty self explanatory to me, and is a very good knot for securing the second end of your ridgeline. If you can't envision the tying of this knot, watch bushcraft series 1 and Ray shows these knots being tied. Picture perfect pause helps a lot with this, video would be a nightmare!
     
  7. Goose

    Goose Need to contact Admin...

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2004
    Messages:
    1,797
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Widnes
    Try this link
    http://uk.geocities.com/zzar_bean/dk2.html
    It is also called a dolly knot, the version you posted a picture of may not release as easily as a truckers hitch/dolly knot. It is a lot easier to use if you have a hook to pass the loop over so th knot is made in the rope without passing the end through. If there is no hook a krab works.
     
  8. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Ohio, U.S.A.
    In the Scouts, we were taught to use the "tautline hitch." You do a half hitch, add one or more additional turns around the standing part, then a half hitch around the standing part ABOVE the first (multiple turn) hitch. When complete, pull up slac

    Pictures available at www.iland.net/~jbritton/tautlinehitch.htm
     
  9. Squidders

    Squidders Full Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2004
    Messages:
    3,853
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Harrow, Middlesex
    I use an evenk knot and a prussiky type thing to get it tight...

    Good advice I got that rings true is you can forget knowing every knot known to man by just putting loads of manky knots in a rope.

    I've used this before and although it may take an hour to undo the knot(s) what really matters is that you don't get wet/fall on the floor/fall down a cliff. ;)

    Joe
     
  10. mojofilter

    mojofilter Nomad

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Messages:
    496
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    bonnie scotland
    You're right Goose, but it was the closest pic I could find :rolleyes:
     
  11. Slimey

    Slimey Tenderfoot

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Hertfordshire
    Hi,

    I use an Evenk at one end and do the following at the other, hope this makes sense! :)

    For the other end I wrap the rope round the tree and pass it over over the standing part (ridge line), pulling it tight. Then come under the standing part and back round the tree, pull tight, go over the standing part and pass it back under the line and round the tree again.

    Each time you do this it tensions the line a bit more, several passes and you can get it nice and tight. Onve you have it tight you can finish of with any knot you like to secure it, I use a chain like knot that comes undone with one pull like the Evenk one.

    There, clear as mud!

    Simon.
     
  12. Marts

    Marts Native

    Joined:
    May 5, 2005
    Messages:
    1,435
    Likes Received:
    32
    Location:
    London
    I use a midshipman's hitch on one end and either same again or a highwayman's hitch on the other
     
  13. Stuart

    Stuart Full Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2003
    Messages:
    4,141
    Likes Received:
    43
    Location:
    **********************
    I use the facloners knot at one end: http://www.bcfalconry.ca/info/falconers_knot.pdf

    like the evenk knot this can be tied with one hand and is quick release.

    at the other end i use the same tensioning knot as slimey describes.

    if you are coming to the july Bushmoot there will be a workshop on knots including putting up a basha
     
  14. Ravenn

    Ravenn Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2005
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Central, Ky,USA
    Grew up in Cincy... learned that same know in scouting, still use it great deal :D
     
  15. Buckshot

    Buckshot Mod
    Mod

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2004
    Messages:
    6,054
    Likes Received:
    121
    Location:
    Oxford
    I use the taughtline hitch (didn't know its called that though) when securing loads and all sorts of jobs. Uses minimal baler twine :)

    Cheers

    Mark
     
  16. mbatham

    mbatham Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2004
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Brierley Hill, Dudley, West Midlands
    The end I want to ancohor is normaly a highwayman's hitch and the end I want to tighten is half sheep shank, similar to the truckers hitch mentioned before., Both these knots will come undone when you can't feel your fingers.

    This all depends on myu mood and the weather though. The evenk overhand knot I use sometimes, as well as a prussicky thype thing.
     
  17. steven andrews

    steven andrews Settler

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2004
    Messages:
    528
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Jersey
    I've got Hilleberg guy line and line runners on my tarps, but the knot to use is the tautline hitch, which is a rolling hitch tied back onto the standing part.
     
  18. Marts

    Marts Native

    Joined:
    May 5, 2005
    Messages:
    1,435
    Likes Received:
    32
    Location:
    London
    Do you not find that the tautline can slip with synthetic cord as it runs on its own standing part? That's why I prefer the midshipman's configuration. :)
     
  19. innocent bystander

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2005
    Messages:
    851
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    wantage
    :confused: :confused:
    http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/tautline.html

    Midshiman's hitch = tautline hitch ?

    :confused: :confused:
     
  20. Marts

    Marts Native

    Joined:
    May 5, 2005
    Messages:
    1,435
    Likes Received:
    32
    Location:
    London
    They are slightly different in an important way - the tautline has two half hitches one after the other , the midshipmans has the two half hitches tied loose intitially so that the second pulls in front of the first. This creates more friction - this is great for slippery synthetics but makes it harder on a rough thicker rope. Horses for courses. Your link actually points that out, though not as clearly as actually trying it. I still don't fully understand the mechanics of it but try tying both and you'll sit there scratching your head like i did :)
     

Share This Page