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Killing Ticks on Clothes - tumble dryer

Discussion in 'Hygiene and First Aid / Medicinal' started by C_Claycomb, Aug 28, 2019.

  1. C_Claycomb

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    Thought this was worthy of its own thread.

    I was looking for info on whether leaving clothes that might be carrying ticks in the deep freeze would kill the ticks (reading suggests very dependent on temperature of freezer, -18C for a week might do it...but might not)

    Anyway, I now have an urge to buy a tumble dryer, something I have never had, or wanted before!!

    http://danielcameronmd.com/kill-tick-clothes/

    Many other sites discussing the use of domestic tumble dryers to kill ticks. To be used before washing clothes, to dehydrate the ticks. This could be a good method. Natural fibres can take quite high temperatures, so long as they are not wet at the same time.

    Chris
     
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  2. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Is this a way of selling more tumble dryers? :)
    Yes ticks can survive the cold as can many insects for long periods such as wintertime. This might be more effective but I would put things in some sort of bag as I wouldn't want any ticks surviving by mistake and getting onto other clothes... or am I just being a bit over worried?
     
  3. Zingmo

    Zingmo Eardstapa

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    As a boy in Africa, my mother would iron everything, bedsheets in particular, to kill the bedbugs, fleas and other visitors.
    How about microwaving stuff?

    Z
     
  4. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Microwave could be a problem ...zips metal buttons etc don't mix well with microwaves. Tends to make them go bang! But could work for other clothes t shirts undies socks etc. Don't tell the Mrs tho. You could end up buying her a new one! :)
     
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  5. C_Claycomb

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    Microwaves work on moisture. Might work on cooking ticks. I have actually burned a cotton wash cloth in a microwave when attempting to speed dry it, so would want to be rather careful with it.
     
  6. Nomad666

    Nomad666 Member

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    Permethrin spray is the only way I know that kills tic's
     
  7. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I would not worry much about a tick in my clothes. I have lived most of my life in tick infested areas, and never received a tick ( attaching to my skin) once I am away from the forests and at home.
     
  8. Robbi

    Robbi Full Member

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    I wonder if the tumble dryer would get the ticks off the dog ?
     
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  9. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Try!
    You will get the fluffiest dog in UK!
     
  10. C_Claycomb

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    What has been your procedure for your clothes when you have gotten home from tick infested areas? Continue wearing clothes, throw them straight in the wash, throw them into the clothes hamper for future washing, hang them up back in the wardrobe, hang them outside?

    My normal procedure, when I am not concerned about ticks, sees clothes often hung back in the wardrobe with all my other clothes, including what I wear to work each day. Dirty kit is put into a laundry bag in the corner of the room to await wash day. I am pretty sure that if I come home with ticks on me, and do either of those, I am running the risk of getting bit when I don't expect it.
     
  11. dwardo

    dwardo Maker

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    Permethrin for me too. I spray clothes every 6 or so washes and do it in the garage where it cant drift where it shouldn't.

    I also de-robe the second I get home and throw everything in a plastic bag in the garage. The usual freeloader I bring home is harvest mites, little bleeders!
     
  12. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I have always worn outdoor specific clothes.
    At home, I take them off, clean off loose dirt, if a small amount of more adherinh dirt - clean under a tap or with a wet rag. Hang up to dry or air, then back into cupboard. I always had a specific area for ‘used but clean’ and ‘washed and unworn’ clothes if that makes sense.
    Very dirty clothes goes into washroom, in a basket.

    When we had dogs, we checked them after each outing. They usually had the ticks on them, us humans rarely

    How about the car? Far bigger risk the tick(s) get there?

    ( playing Devil’s Advocate here)
     
  13. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I grew up basically wearing the same clothing all the time: I.e. my school clothes were my play clothes (playing included outdoor play such as hunting, fishing, wandering the woods, etc.) and they were my chore clothes (chores included outdoor activities also (feeding the pets, the livestock, cleaning the stables, splitting and bringing in firewood and liters, etc.) No, I didn’t usually change clothes until my shower that night before bed, and even then, the dirty clothing went into the hamper to wait for the next wash whether it be the next day or the day after that.

    However that was over a half century ago and back then we really didn’t think of ticks as much more than a nuisance. Yes, we knew there were tick borne diseases (my mother was an RN) but they were relatively rare.

    Even now I don’t bother too much about them although I did get the Lyme Disease vaccine series when it was still available.
     
  14. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    They are still rare.

    And would be rarer still if people followed the recommendations.
     

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