1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

identifying mushrooms

Discussion in 'Lovely Grub' started by crwydryny, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. crwydryny

    crwydryny Tenderfoot

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2008
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    south wales
    does anyone know of any good online sources for identifying mushrooms and other fungi prefrably one's that note if the fungi is toxic or edible?
    I have a few field guides but they rarely contain enough infomation to identify them 100% as I tend to be a bit cautious when it comes to such things but lately I've been becoming more intrested in identifying mushrooms as my current job involves a lot of time in the woods and I'm begining to realise my lack of knowledge in this area (I've avoided mushrooms for years due to the risks involved)

    and before anyone says it I'm not going to go eat whatever I find unless I'm 100% sure and even then I'd probably think twice... I got a few annoying voulenteers working with me for that lol
     
  2. salad

    salad Full Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    1,748
    Likes Received:
    123
    Location:
    In the Mountains
    Hello

    The best thing to do in my mind is to get yourself on a foraging course, there are loads of stuff like that in all areas of the country at this time of year by all different groups (not just bushcraft folk) . They don't cost much for a day out with someone who knows what they are doing and its this experience that you will never be able to get from the internet or a guide book.

    Guide books and internet sources are there to back you up once you know what you are doing

    Also having someone who knows what they are doing help identify mushrooms for you will help give you confidence to eat the mushrooms you pick. The first time you actually eat wild mushrooms that you have picked can be a nervous time , it really helps to have someone who knows back your identification up
     
  3. shaggystu

    shaggystu Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2003
    Messages:
    4,345
    Likes Received:
    30
    Location:
    Derbyshire
    what salad said.

    you really don't want to be taking any chances with funghi, they're bloody dangerous, it only needs one little mistake and you're in a whole world of...........erm..........trouble.

    that said, the river cottage handbook was the one that finally gave me the confidence to eat some of the funghi that i find, it's the one resource that i'd recommend without hesitation.

    happy hunting

    stuart
     
  4. slowworm

    slowworm Settler

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    948
    Likes Received:
    81
    Location:
    Devon
    http://www.rogersmushrooms.com/ is a very useful site, and his book is also a good reference too.

    Agree about the courses, if you can go on a day out with a knowledgeable person that does give you confidence.
     
  5. crwydryny

    crwydryny Tenderfoot

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2008
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    south wales
    I know not to take any risks with fungi I have enough experience with bushcraft and the likes to know where to draw the line but it's one area I've never explored simply because I know how dangerous they are. I'm mostly intrested in just trying to identify them just for the sake of identifying them

    as for courses and the likes, right now I don't have either the time (I work for a local conservation charity and teach a martial arts class so I'm working 13 hour days through the week most of the time) or money (I currently have about £25 for the next 2 weeks and £18 of that is for insurance for training) also lack of transport limits the places I can travel to for courses and such otherwise I would

    thanks for the link slowworm I'll check it out.
     
  6. listenclear

    listenclear Nomad

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    East lothian
    Another thumbs up fot the river cottage book. It's simple, has a key and it's fun to read. If you can't find the fungus your trying to id in that book - just leave it. Defo a good idea to go out with others though. I've studied hard for 4 years now and it's only the last 2 seasons I've been eating what I've found - even then, last year it was only one or 2 species.
    It's well worth the effort though mate - good luck
     
  7. Nonsuch

    Nonsuch Full Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,862
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Scotland, looking at mountains
    The Peglar book is superb - a mixture of pictures and highly detailed drawings designed to draw out the key features, and each edible fungus has look-alikes shown on the opposite pages so you learn the differences. However, going on a course or two is the only sure way.
     
  8. Reaps72

    Reaps72 Forager

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2011
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Yorkshire
  9. crwydryny

    crwydryny Tenderfoot

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2008
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    south wales
    thanks for the links I'll check them out later, I'll have to see if my local book store has any of the books mentioned. unfortunatly the only one near me is a 2nd hand book store so it's basically the luck of the dice if they have any.
    but as I said earlier it's mostly out of curiosity rather than for eating
     
  10. Nonsuch

    Nonsuch Full Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,862
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Scotland, looking at mountains
    Amazon time!
     

Share This Page