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How do you cope with Mud.

Discussion in 'Bushcraft and survival skills' started by Wayne, Oct 1, 2019.

  1. Wayne

    Wayne BCUK Welfare Officer
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    I love camping throughout the year but this wet weather has one major downside and that’s mud.

    What strategies do you have for minimising it’s impact.

    Everything gets caked in the stuff.

    Gear, tents, footpaths and trails. This time of year our impact on the woods increases.
     
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  2. Le Loup

    Le Loup Nomad

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    To be honest Wayne I have spent years in the woods in West Sussex & I live in a forest in New England Australia, & I have never had a problem with mud. I guess I just avoid muddy places. I always set up camp on high ground. I certainly keep my gear out of the mud.
    Keith.
     
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  3. Deekin

    Deekin Full Member

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    I always attempt to avoid it, and knowing the areas I frequent I tend to use different places depending on the season. Also because I stick to remote areas there tends not to be a lot of human impact, the greatest erosional effect is often sheep tracks causing off hill "drainage" onto the walking tracks. As far as camping goes, thick unmanaged conifer forest always offers good cover and reasonably dry ground, it just requires a bit of thought and consideration re lighting fire's. (Stating the obvious).
     
  4. SaraR

    SaraR Full Member

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    Avoid as much as possible (eg where pitching tent) and putting down a layer of thin branches, rushes or dead grass underneath places that will get trampled a lot.
     
  5. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    As all of the posts above, but it's worth lugging along a spare bit of groundsheet (the stuff sold in £stores is fine for this) to use as a bit inside the tent door to catch anything muddy, a place to put the boots, etc., and it's handy around the place as cut up bits if you really 'have' to put something down, even if it's just when you're making fire using the firebow, or stacking firewood and kindling.
    If you're going totally non plastic though, those tension trays I showed a long while ago are excellent for all of the above.
    M
     
  6. Bishop

    Bishop Full Member

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    Here in Wales mud is not really a problem, the torrential rain washes it off really quick :)

    But seriously.. when it comes to traversing muddy stretches, embrace the horror. Whilst being ankle deep or worse in mud sucks big time trying to dance around it nearly always ends in a slippery disaster. As for setting up camp Le Loup's sage words should be your mantra, always look for the higher ground.

    Lovely place to pitch up right?, sheltered valley, soft grass, relatively flat and it is awesome spot during the summer if you like midges.
    After heavy rain however notice the water level in the stream.. whole area becomes a muddy sponge.
    DSCN4367.JPG
    Moel Prysgau Bothy - Great fun to visit in a 4x4, on foot you question your sanity!
     
  7. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Log-sorting "landings" are just level places carved out of the mountain sides.
    Pure rock/gravel/sand/clay soils. Outwash and machinery can make them pretty muddy as time goes by.
    It's obvious that someone has added generous handfuls of grass seed. Light weight and inexpensive.
    Now, they are nearly park-like camp sites many miles from anywhere.
     
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  8. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    How I cope and have coped with mud?
    Badly. Hate it.
    The worst is it clogs up the thread on the boots, so you lose grip. Makes boots very, very heavy.

    Having a buggered knee since my early 20ies, mud was the absolutely worst substrate for me to walk on.
     
  9. Rick Turner

    Rick Turner New Member

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    Glorious mud . Adapt and use it for a project . Use it to your advantage then have a good wash afterwards
     
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  10. Erbswurst

    Erbswurst Native

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    I never had any problems with mud.

    --- until I moved into the area of Colone.

    I didn't really go for camping in winter and spring time in that area. But I thought about it. And I started to think about hammocking in cold conditions.

    Somehow everywhere in the forest they have round about 5 to 10 cm deep mudd, even on the hills.

    Very interesting, very disgusting.

    I just decided to stay at home and to do some paper work.
     
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  11. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    As many have said, avoid it if you can. If that’s not possible, embrace the suck.
     
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  12. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    In my working life mud is a constant factor.

    We dress for it. Wellies are excellent, muck boots are better. Gaiters can be a godsend, but are truly dire to get off if they're the buckle on kind. Don't wear expensive 'breathable' caghoules, they just clog up. Wear something you can sponge down at the end of the day and hang up to dry. Wax jackets are really good, they wipe down and dry off with paper towels. Sorted for the next day. Unless it's pouring too. Wax jackets aren't really designed to keep the rain out, not really. Too many are 'country fashion' style instead of the ultimate practicality style.
    British army surplus kit works in the mud :)

    Baby wipes are awfully usefuI even if I loathe the damned things, because they really aren't 'disposable' as claimed; they're plastic re-inforced.
    One of those big cheap and cheerful car washing sponges (4 for a pound, pound land) is a brilliant mud cleaning off tool. That and any water you can get hold of. Rain, a field drain, a ditch, a burn, even a settled puddle, the sponge gets rid of the mud.
     
  13. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Sounds like you gals and guys roll in it?

    How on Earth do you get it above ankle height?
    (Unless you fall of course. )
    :)
     
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  14. Wander

    Wander Nomad

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    I just ignore it and get on with things.
    Oh yes, I certainly try to avoid it if I can, but if I can't, well...mud it is.

    Mind you, where I live it is all chalk and clay, and if you were to let the mud stop you doing anything then you'd do nothing.

    Avoid it where you can, ignore it where you can't. And knock the clods off your boots when you get the chance.
     
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  15. Erbswurst

    Erbswurst Native

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  16. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Looks like waders?
    Have you ever tried to have a quick wee in one of those?
    :)
     
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  17. demographic

    demographic Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Where I grew up was basically a swamp on a hillside and yes it is possible so I got pretty good at boghopping over the deep bits and walking on the tufts of grass/sedges.
    It was noted at my secondary school that I was quite fast at cross country running, I wasnt actually that fast, just better at getting across the boggy section that the Nestle factory used to spray milky outflow onto and over that 300 yards gained a fair bit of distance over some of the others.
    I still hate deep mud and avoid it as much as possible.
     
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  18. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Lots of people pay good money to have mud smeared over their faces and bodies.
     
  19. Bishop

    Bishop Full Member

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    Bog Snorkelling is an essential survival skill in Wales ;)
    bog-snork-1.jpg
     
  20. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    After a days hard graft working the coal face, it is the only true relaxation!
    And restores the skin!
    :)
     
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