1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Green lane capable camper

Discussion in 'Transport - 4x4 - Canoes etc' started by Buckshot, May 31, 2018.

  1. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,464
    Likes Received:
    2,019
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    Oh yes, that certainly counts!


    Are you legaly permitted to drive on headland/ beaches in UK?
    Snow covered roads? Of course you do not need a 4x4 offroader, or even a standard 4x4.
    You think we use horses or Reindeer in Scandinavia unless we ion a 4x4 off-roader?

    Norwegian roads are superiour to the Swedish ones these days. They have a somewhat better economy.

    I did many green lanes in the south east, most were fine with a normal car. The odd destroyed part of the lane needed an offroad capable vehicle or a shovel, pickaxe and muscles. On a few green lanes.

    My point was - as I am sure all intelligent people here understand - is that very few of us need an offoroad capable vehicle as we never do any off roading. In UK you can go on prepared iffroad courses, or green lanes.
    In Scandinavia ( where many of you guy go or plan/dream of going) it is illegal.

    Be buy them for the coolness factor.

    It may sound strange to you young guys, but loads and loads people used to travel all across Europe in a small, rear wheel drive car with 65 hp, map, no radio. With a tent, sleeping bags, children and spouse. Some sort of burner, foldable chairs and table.
    When Nescafe became common in the shops, it was a happy revolution!

    No, I do not talk early 1900’, but 1970’s.

    It worked. They saw lots, had lots of fun. Grass was just as wet and slippery then. Roads were just as icy and snow covered then.
     
    #41 Janne, Sep 23, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2018
    dp0001 likes this.
  2. Broch

    Broch Full Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    2,232
    Likes Received:
    1,503
    Location:
    Mid Wales
    I've never asked :)

    Did you mean that to sound derisory? :) (only joking)

    Oh how I wish that opening sentence was aimed at me :)

    But, you're right, my first Sahara trek was in a Renault 4 in the 70's :)
     
    dp0001 likes this.
  3. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,464
    Likes Received:
    2,019
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    I did a two week trip starting in Marocco to Tunisia. Driving from Marrakesh to Tunis.
    Across the Atlas Mountains, then skirting south of them.
    We had the Spanish version of the Defender, the Santana.
    It was interesting for a few days, but to be frank quite boring.
    I hated the heat, the flies, ( and to be truthful, the locals).
    We had two accompanying cars. F@&$#@ Citroen vans with rear wheel drive!) that did like 75% of the same tracks.

    It was in 88 or 89.
     
    #43 Janne, Sep 23, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2018
  4. Broch

    Broch Full Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    2,232
    Likes Received:
    1,503
    Location:
    Mid Wales
    Back to the OP's question though - it's something I have been looking into for the last year. I'm not ready to go the camper route yet but in another five years or so (well maybe ten) I will struggle to load the Oz tent on the Landy so seriously need to think about alternatives. I don't care about on-board sanitation but I do want good ground clearance, low range box, and at least 20mpg. It's that last one that's the real killer in all the solutions I've identified. A VW Syncro based vehicle would be good (but no low range and now getting very old). The 4x4 Iveco Daily is certainly very capable (I worked on a military version at one time) but not cheap and not good on fuel.

    I'm seriously beginning to think I may have to build one :)
     
  5. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,464
    Likes Received:
    2,019
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    All wheel drive is inherently more energy using than two wheel drive.
    Also noisier, wear the tyres more and as it has more parts - higher risk for failure.

    If you want an allwheel drive vesrion of a car - compare the diving comfort and turning ability with a two wheel drive version, see if you are happy with the difference.
     
  6. Nomad64

    Nomad64 Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2015
    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    479
    Location:
    Just out of range
    I met a very elderly British couple in Nairobi a few years ago who had an Iveco 4x4 camper which IIRC had originally been built as Iveco’s unsuccessful tender for British Army a military ambulance - is this what you worked on?
     
  7. Broch

    Broch Full Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    2,232
    Likes Received:
    1,503
    Location:
    Mid Wales
    No, the vehicle we worked on was an armoured 'up-rated' vehicle :) - fun but impractical.
     
    Nomad64 likes this.
  8. Deekin

    Deekin Full Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2019
    Messages:
    1,266
    Likes Received:
    568
    Location:
    Scotland
    For many years a Hilux was my daily truck, so I had one of these;
    it also fitted a 109, and 110 Land Rover.

     
    CLEM and Nice65 like this.
  9. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,685
    Likes Received:
    1,088
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    There are tens of thousands of those truck campers here. Lots of them with a jack-up roof for occupation.
    Just a luxurious and warm/snug in pouring rain as a house.

    Many of them have been built with little care and attention for any weight-saving measures.
    Added to that, the trucks get bigger but they have diminished load bearing capacity.

    So your next confrontation is with the police and insurance checks because you are driving overloaded!
    Impound if you don't take it off and park it right there on the spot.
     
  10. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2009
    Messages:
    4,088
    Likes Received:
    899
    Location:
    W.Sussex
    Pics or it didn’t happen, it’s the rules :deal:. I’d love to see that beastie.
     
    MrEd likes this.
  11. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2009
    Messages:
    4,088
    Likes Received:
    899
    Location:
    W.Sussex
    I’ve driven around Alberta, BC Oregon in a RV, your country is geared towards it, living with nature, it’s ingrained, acceptable, and encouraged. Even the family RVs like we rented were superbly catered for with nicely secluded pitches, barbecue area, log supply, often hook ups. Here the problem isn’t likely to be overloading, it’s generally illegal to just park up anywhere for the night. I do see a lot of smaller camper vans in lay-bys, but you take a chance of the police being a bit too busy and bossy in the middle of the night and banging on the door.

    Best camper type vehicle I ever met ever was a converted Bedford horse box. It belonged to a friend who had kept all the original wood outer, but had cut sections out and refitted them to form shutters over proper glass windows. From the outside you’d never have known there was a mini wooden spiral staircase up into the Luton section, and a couple of old leather armchairs fixed to the floor next to the woodburner with its periscope type chimney and rain flap. But, back in the mid to late eighties, if you wanted to live like that, you needed to be camo. I’ll not go into the politics, but travelling, non-conformists were persecuted for their lifestyle choice. I think it’s affected the situation ever since, only the rather staid Caravan Club are acceptable. It’s sad really.

    Apologies, this hasn’t much to do with 4x4 proper off-road adventures. I’ve done some green laning in The Lake District in 90s and 110s, but it’s not a case of park anywhere and spend the night, we had to rent a field and use it as our base. I’m tempted, as I’m needing a bigger vehicle, to try and find a 110 at a good price while I consider the more attractive options of kitted 4x4 Toyota or Mitzi, fully kitted van like a Sprinter, or pick up truck snail shells (I’d rather put up the bell tent than fart around with those shells I think. I’d have cooked, eaten and been on a glass of single malt while that guy was still winding his legs down.)

    The reason for wanting to grab a good nick 110 is to dump a mattress, tent, everything in it and just have a try out with it for a few weeks, see which options suit me, my wife, and two dogs. Big bell tent for a few days somewhere nice, back of the Landy for easy overnight stop. I figure a careful buy of a 110 should give me most of my money back, while I warm my hands on the RAC vans blower, watch the wipers actually wipe the windows, sit in a comfortable seat and marvel at headlights that light up more than a few yards in front. :D

    I do love off-roading, but it isn’t freedom driving in England, it’s more bloke fun and back to base for the night. I’d like to find my/our needs and take the right vehicle off to places where I’m not paranoid about being moved on, and with a view to putting it on a ferry and taking off abroad for a while.
     
    #51 Nice65, Feb 16, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2019
    MrEd and Robson Valley like this.
  12. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,685
    Likes Received:
    1,088
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    HA! I've sometimes wondered about refitting a horse float, a big one. Clever disguise.
    The live-in snowmobile trailers almost look like that. More money than brains.
    $100k for the truck, $20k for the sled and NOX mods, etc, $30k for the live-in trailer.
    Maybe 50-100 each night around McBride like that.

    At least you can mess around and never worry about a Grizz tearing off your door for the smell of food at night.
    That's what keeps me coming home, as the wilderness is 20+ minutes away.
    Getting up for a whizz in a cold rainy windy night is no problem at my place!
     
  13. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,464
    Likes Received:
    2,019
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    Nice65, you need to get that 110 and spend some quality time in Scandinavia.
    If you have a few weeks, you can enjoy yourself as never before.
    I can recommend places seldom visited by tourists, hidden gems! Both cultural and natural.

    No risk of nocturnal bears ripping off the door for that opened can of HP best beans.
    No risk of blonde locals in gum boots brandishing a shotgun interrupting your beauty sleep!
    (Well, that can be arranged too, but can cost coin.:) )
     
    MrEd likes this.
  14. Deekin

    Deekin Full Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2019
    Messages:
    1,266
    Likes Received:
    568
    Location:
    Scotland
    There is also the Mazda Bongo 4 x 4 camper, and the VW Syncro, and these are good.

     
  15. SaraR

    SaraR Full Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2017
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    105
    Location:
    Ceredigion
    The 4x4 abilities aside, surely you'd be able to get an ordinary mobile home that sleeps two to four, with toilet/ shower, that is less than 3.5 tonnes?! A lot of the modern ones are a lot lower to the ground, but older ones often have a bit more ground clearance. Just need to find one with less of an overhang.
     
  16. didicoy

    didicoy Full Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    534
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    fens
  17. didicoy

    didicoy Full Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    534
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    fens
  18. Bazzworx

    Bazzworx Full Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2009
    Messages:
    317
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    South Glos
    Our Syncro has low range, It also has a decoupler so you can select 2 or 4 wheel drive and cross axle diff locks. They are really capable off road too. I agree with them being old now, our one is 1986 but the benefit is that road side repairs are easier to diagnose and rectify.

    We've been building ours into an expedition vehicle but parts and accessories cost a fortune because of the VW scene tax and the Syncro tax. So far the restoration has taken us a year but we couldn't commit many weekends to it last year, we're hoping to have it finished with in the next six months or so.

    This is ours a few months ago, it's got quite a few extras now like an expedition roof rack and new wheels and tyres.

    [​IMG]
     
    Van-Wild, Deekin and MrEd like this.
  19. Van-Wild

    Van-Wild Nomad

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2018
    Messages:
    329
    Likes Received:
    193
    Location:
    UK
    I have a 2WD VW T6. it's built for adventure. Pop top, fridge, eberspacher night heater. Rear bike rack adapted for fuel cans and bits and bobs. Fridge, cassette toilet, portable pump shower, cooker.... I regularly go off tarmac. Gravel tracks, forestry roads, across fields. Even drove down a wide, shallow river once or twice. Standard ride hight, slightly bigger tyres. Totally capable for everything I've driven it on. I've done over 40,000 miles in less than 2 years. 4x4 would be awesome I guess, but I've not needed it yet and it's rather bloody expensive!

    Sent from my SM-G903F using Tapatalk
     
    Nomad64 and Janne like this.
  20. Buckshot

    Buckshot Mod
    Mod

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2004
    Messages:
    6,051
    Likes Received:
    119
    Location:
    Oxford
    We're now looking at something similar Van Wild for very similar kind of locations really.
    I'd be interested in seeing how you've customised the bike rack- again we're thinking of doing something similar.
    Have you been anywhere outside the UK?
     
    Nomad64 and Van-Wild like this.

Share This Page