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Everest 2019

Discussion in 'Bushcraft Chatter' started by Bishop, May 24, 2019.

  1. Tengu

    Tengu Full Member

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    If they thought about the environment impact they would just stay at home.

    If they wanted to live then they would do something else.

    My personal hero is Maurice Wilson
     
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  2. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Tengu, the same can be said about us.
    To stay at home.
     
    #22 Janne, May 26, 2019
    Last edited: May 26, 2019
  3. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    If you got enough cash you can buy your way to the summit. Where is the adventure in that. ?
    My best adventures have been low or no cost and I've had plenty. The one adventure I've bought was a real dissopointment in comparison. I won't be buying another "structured adventure" ever again . For me the fun is taking things as they come with a deal of flexibility to pursue options as they arise and not worry if I can't do what I originally planned as there is always a next time. If you've payed out thousands of pounds for a once in a lifetime event you take risks that wouldn't normally be taken to pursue your paid for goal.
     
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  4. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    The money buys you the access and the equipment.
    You still have to do the walking.

    ( not that I personally see the point of being in a vertical line shuffling behind somebody)

    On the positive side, think of the locals. They make a very good living out of those tourists!
     
  5. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Yes some do.. but some die on the mountain too leaving widows and orphans. I do wonder if the "clients" of those particular trips ever give those families a second thought once they get home. All for the sake of a bucket list.
     
  6. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I do not think many Sherpas die each year?
    It is a risk they know about.
    Benefits contra risks...

    Youtube and tiny portable recording devices has created a ‘need’ for showing off lethal, idiotic things and practices.

    A while ago a young guy believed a book could stop a .50 AE round.
    His girlfriend too. A good stunt for their Youtube audience.
     
  7. Tengu

    Tengu Full Member

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    My cousin died in the mountains. This was the Cairngorms, not anywhere else, early 90s.

    He was experienced or he would not have been there in the winter.

    I looked up to him, was very angry with him for it.

    These days, I am older and a little more understanding.
     
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  8. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    When you are poor and see rich people willing to spend lots of money and you see a way to get some of that cash... even if it means possible taking a huge risk with your life .....you are going to take that risk.
    Yes sherpas get caught out and die from various mountain causes same as any other human. They have the advantage of knowing their territory but an avalanche or crevasse opening up bad weather etc etc do not discriminate between any human being.
    We don't hear much about it because a sherpa dying doesn't affect us. But half a dozen westerners is big news!
     
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  9. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    I'm sorry to hear that tengu.
    Experience does not mean you won't get caught out.. just as I say to Janne.
     
  10. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    The Sherpas have a choice, just like we do.
    Risk and reward.

    According to the net, 111 or so Nepalese have died in Everest in total.
    About 200 other nationals.

    But we do not know out of how

    I think 10 people have died on Everest in 2019 so far.
     
    #30 Janne, May 26, 2019
    Last edited: May 26, 2019
  11. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    I remember a story about few years ago about a woman who took over her husbands sherpa job after her husband died on the mountain as it was the only way to support herself and her children. Not great to have to risk you life and possibly making your children orphans just to be able to feed and clothe your kids.
    There is a lot the west doesn't want to know about.
     
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  12. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Great choice!
    Risk your life or live a primitive life scraping a living no education or medicine. What sort of real choice is that?
    So more than one and a bit sherpas diefor every two westerners. Not great odds! And yes one Nepalese person has died due to exhaustion.
     
    #32 Woody girl, May 26, 2019
    Last edited: May 26, 2019
  13. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Janne sorry if I seem to be shouting you down but I have a friend who lived out there running a small hostel just down the mountain for western backpackers going up the mountain to base camp. They set up a women's craft co operative for the widows of Sherpas selling the crafts to westerners so the women could support themselves without risking their lives. They also set up permaculture gardens so that families could grow their own food to be less reliant on westerners money to be able to live. They have been honoured by the Deli Lamma for their work. So I do know quite a bit about how things work out there.
    Her daughter tara joy wrote a book called the inner sense of trees, and runs a water aid ngo. I recommend the book for children and also adults. It has a strong message for today.
     
    #33 Woody girl, May 26, 2019
    Last edited: May 26, 2019
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  14. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    No, you are not shouting me down. A healthy exchange of views.

    That is the problem, the division of wealth worldwide. The poor want what the rich have, thinking their lives will improve.
    But has it improved?
     
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  15. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    The countries around the Himalayas would make a roaring tourist business if they created interconnected trekking trails, with manned ‘chalets’.

    In Reine there is a ‘mountain’ called Reinebringen. Around 550meters high. Very steep track to sccess the top, vertical drop on the other side, with fantastic views.
    Google ‘Reine Lofoten’ on Images, that is what you see from the top.
    The council have employed a group of Nepalese to stone pave the track, as it became incredibly dangerous due to the hordes of tourists ascending it. Been working on it now for two summers.

    I have been uo twice. Once in prehistory, before there was a visible track, and last time about 10 years ago, with a track but before the hordes.

    Both times I creeped on all four, and the last bit on my stomach, to peek over the edge.
    People take selfies standing on the edge.
     
  16. petrochemicals

    petrochemicals Full Member

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    ae they really climbing it or is it the procession we see, ladders ropes all make it easier, why not sod it and put a chairlift up, there would be a lot less cra p on the mountain.
     
  17. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    To be honest on another thread we are talking about electric cars being the new normal, but still flying thousands of miles for our holiday fun. The last time I spent an hour at Heathrow waiting for a coach all I could smell was aviation fumes l and diesel exhaust fumes. We pat ourselves on the back for having an electric car then cancel it all out with just one flight.
    So I'm wondering why we realy need to leave our crap in other peoples wilderness and turn it into a tourist trap while patting ourselves on our backs saying how much our tourist dollars improve their lives???
     
  18. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    The tourists not need to leave the refuse there. Just take it back. Simple. Weights less than to carry it up. I do not understand why people leave the stuff.
    And why the locals accept it.

    Having said that, the tourists visiting Reine, mainly young European people visiting for the so called Eco Tourism, leave a lot of mess behind too. When we go for walks, we usually pick up after them. Most locals do the same. And a couple of times a year, locals go out en masse and clean up the mess.
    Last year we were there when they did it, so we of course joined.
    The bulk of the rubbish is empty Energy Bar packages, second is packages from freeze died meals, then empty water bottles.

    Eco Tourists without Eco sensible brains.

    I found an intact outer tent two years ago. Ultralight, waterproof. Perfect as a protection when I sleep outside.
    Some Eco Tourist did not anchor it properly on the mountain.
    Thank you!
     
  19. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    The most impressive tourists were a young and wealthy group of Chinese my son saw last year close to the summit.
    The ladies wore high heels.
    All clothes type ‘sexy party clothes’.
    He was impressed. They made it up.
    Stamina and dedication, and impressive selfies!

    I saw the group later on, when they enjoyed a coffee and Apple cake in the excellent coffee house there.
     
  20. Tengu

    Tengu Full Member

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    This is all a big joke to me.

    I have never been able to afford holidays abroad.
     

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