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English words for trees, plants and animals. English-norwegian dictionary.

Discussion in 'Flora & Fauna' started by Skaukraft, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. Skaukraft

    Skaukraft Settler

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    In my own interesst, I would like to learn the english common name for a variety of trees, plants and animals.
    Many I already know, but some I don't.

    I will add to the list underway, but here is for starters:

    English: Latin Norsk (Norewgian)
    Goat Willow - Salix Caprea - Selje
    Downy Birch - Betula pubescens - Bjoerk
    Silver Birch? - Betula pendula - Hengebjoerk
    Birch? - Betula nana - Fjellbjoerk
    Pine - Pinus sylvestris - Furu
    Spurce - Picea abies - Gran
    Ash - Fraxinus excelsior - Ask
    Mountain Ash ? - Sorbus aucuparia - Rogn
    Alder ? - Alnus incae/glutinosa - Or
    Aspen - Populus tremula - Osp/Asp
    Juniper - Juniperus communis - Einer
    Bird cherry - Prunus padus - Hegg
    Limewood - Tilia cordate - Lind
    ?? - Bistorta vivipara - Harerug
    Blueberry - Vaccinium myrtillus - Blaabaer
    Cowberry - Vaccinium vitis-idaea - Tyttebaer
    Cloud berry? - Rubus chamaemorus - Multe/Molte
    Fatwood - ?? - Tyri
     
    #1 Skaukraft, Apr 13, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2012
  2. Steffen

    Steffen Forager

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    i'm pretty sure einer is called juniper in english.
     
  3. shaggystu

    shaggystu Full Member

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    downy Birch - Betula pubescens - Bjoerk
    silver Birch - Betula pendula - Hengebjoerk
    i don't recognise betula nana

    mountain ash is also known as rowan

    and that's it off the top of my head
     
  4. Skaukraft

    Skaukraft Settler

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    Betula nana is what we call Mountain Birch, it is smaller and more robust than the ordinary kind.
     
  5. shaggystu

    shaggystu Full Member

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    quick google on the Alnus and as far as i'm aware i've only ever seen Alnus glutinosa in the UK, which is just called common alder. someone may come along and tell me that i'm wrong though, it could well be that i don't know the difference between the two plants!
     
  6. shaggystu

    shaggystu Full Member

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    oh ok, i think we call that dwarf birch, it's not something i see very often
     
  7. Skaukraft

    Skaukraft Settler

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    We have two kinds here, the Grey Alder and the Black Alder.
     
  8. shaggystu

    shaggystu Full Member

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    we have black alder, Alnus glutinosa, which i know simply as alder. i don't know if we have grey alder or not
     
  9. Osprey

    Osprey Forager

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    Cowberry is Vaccinium vitis-idaea
    Bird cherry is Prunus padus
     
  10. shaggystu

    shaggystu Full Member

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    Prunus padus, i'm reliably informed that this is bird cherry. we have gemma to thank for this one :)
     
  11. dwardo

    dwardo Maker

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    "bird cherry" is a bit missleading and can be many of the cherries. Thats the problem with common names. Even so called english names over the pond are completely different species to ours. Hornbeam and beech for instance, also lime basswood etc.
     
  12. blacktimberwolf

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    Wolf - Canis lupus - ulv. :)
     
  13. bushwacker bob

    bushwacker bob Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Bistorta vivipara is alpine bistort.
     
  14. Skaukraft

    Skaukraft Settler

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    Nice work guys. Thanks a lot.
    I have a more complete list stored somewhere, bur I am workin of two different computers at the moment, and one of them is not to good.
    The reason why I started this list years ago was that I read a lot of stuff bout indian (the native american kind) arts, crafts and cooking for a while, and needed to learn what is what.
    I'll add more to the list later.
     
  15. forestwalker

    forestwalker Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    There are two sources I turn to for species name translation. One is http://linnaeus.nrm.se/flora/, which is an online plant guide, maintained by the Swedish Museum of Natural History. It is in Swedish, but if you type in a name in Latin, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, English or German it will find the entry. While all the lovely text is in Swedish, right there on top is the name of the plant in all of those languages.

    The second source is a book Biologisk artlista, which gives various species names in English, Latin and Swedish. Sadly out of print, but definitely a usefull source if one is a biology geek (which I am).
     
  16. Skaukraft

    Skaukraft Settler

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    Thanks mate. Never seen that site before. A bit embaressing really, since Carl von Linné was one of my childhood heroes, and was the one to give name to my favourite flower, the Linnea Borealis.
    Reading and understanding swedish is no problem, so I guess I will spend most of this saturday reading:D
     
  17. Osprey

    Osprey Forager

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    Interesting thread :)

    When I was studying biology we had to learn latin names, which I found a real chore, but then you realise the beauty and importance of Linneas's system when you speak to folk in other countries.
    I was on a resarch trip in Finland last year with biologists and foresters from several countries, and there was much confusion whwn we used our own names for species, eg moose/elk, elk/red deer, reindeer/caribou, cowberry/lingonberry. All was resolved by using the Latin names.
     
  18. forestwalker

    forestwalker Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Well, I expected you to understand it, but for some strange reason most people here do not.

    The book is an utterly booring reference work: just lists of names in three columns, sorted by all three languages (i.e. everything is there three times). Very usefull when checking up scientifitc texts, but with the horror of common names I expect that there one will be lost lots of times (many common names for some plants, the same name used for different plants in different regions, etc); this is why botanists use latin almost excusively.

    If one is lucky enought to have a plant guide in the local language one can use the latin as a sort of lingua franca (e.g. mjölke, hmm that is Epilobium angustifolium... goes to UK plant guide... Epilobium, there we have it Rosebay willowherb). Which incidentally is one of the evil ones, with at least 10 common names in Swedish.
     
  19. The Ratcatcher

    The Ratcatcher Full Member

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    And to add to the confusion, Epilobium angustifolium is called Riverweed in the area around Manchester, UK, and Fireweed in parts of Canada. Confusing or what?

    Alan
     
  20. forestwalker

    forestwalker Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I actually knew abut the Fireweed name (Petersens Field Guide to Edible Plants, from the 1980s).
    The Swedish synonyms includes a trap for the unwary translator: one of them is "rävsvans", litterally "foxtail" (and the similiar "rävrumpa"[1] has also been used for Equisetum arvense, a totally different plant).

    [1] "Fox bum" (as in derriere, but more down to earth)
     

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