1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

All the knives in the world wouldn't help.......

Discussion in 'Bushcraft and survival skills' started by rhyan, Dec 30, 2015.

  1. John Fenna

    John Fenna Lifetime Member & Maker

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    21,498
    Likes Received:
    880
    Location:
    Pembrokeshire
    Aye but it is the minor ones that come back to bite you in later years ...
    When I was 20 I sprained my knee (fairly badly as it turns out) but as it did not hurt too much I carried on with my walk (15 miles more that day and 40 miles all told over the next week) - I was in the middle of a Lands End to John ) Groats walk and did not want to quit...
    A poor diagnosis from a GP delayed my seeing a specialist for a few months - during which I struggled on (never did complete my "Big Walk" ) climbing, hiking etc etc.
    It turns out I had torn ligaments, muscles and cartilage and had basically wrecked the joint!
    I never had the care the injury needed at the time and this lead to chronic weakness and further sprains, while "over-compensation" has wrecked my other knee and my Sacro-illiac joint... twisting of my spine (combined with the effect of a broken neck I got playing Rugby in my youth - again not treated appropriately at the time) lead to nearly losing the use of my right arm as nerves got crushed between 1st rib and collarbone....
    A partial dislocation of my shoulder was never shown to my doctor (it happened during my Canoe 5star exam and I did not want to quit and fail - so I carried on... it reduced itself later that day - with a clunk that was heard yards away...) and now I am looking at surgery to repair the joint: at present I cannot canoe shoot a bow, do much sawing or wood chopping and have chronic pain!
    Minor injuries have a habit of being more serious than we give them credit for!
    Take your time and get the ankle healed FULLY and keep an eye on any minor aches and pains elsewhere that could be the symptoms of problems caused by over compensation...
    Good luck!
     
  2. VinyGroundhog

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2016
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Portugal (formerly Texas)
    Sounds like you need to invest in some high boots. I can't even tell you how many times I've rolled an ankle and my boots saved me from a hospital trip. I use rubber-soled cowboy boots, but I expect that riding boots would work too. Being leather, they also have the added benefit of being snake/small animal proof.
     
  3. rhyan

    rhyan Full Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Messages:
    195
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    UK
    Hiya
    that sounds like possibly a very good idea!
     
  4. Richard Francis Burton

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2016
    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    Focuses the Mind though, eh! Some times we need these reminders to keep us switched on. Ankles are a killer, can be easily turned too, I've done mine on nothing more than stepping crook on a Bleeding Stone. But now you are clarified in mind on what needs to be done, and now fully aware. High Leg Boots for the Win, man. Or some Putties if yer got Ankle Boots for the Summer might be worth a look. But some times though, when doing some thing as seemingly innocuous as messing about a stones throw from yer House ends up being a mission to get in the House. Cos that Damn Ankle just goes.

    All the Best, Mate.
     
  5. Laurentius

    Laurentius Native

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2009
    Messages:
    1,781
    Likes Received:
    111
    Location:
    Knowhere
    It has happened to me before, I have the kind of ankles that turn easily so it can happen at any time. This is why a good walking stick or hiking staff that can support my weight without breaking is a constant companion, I don't think trekking poles can hack it when you are using them to help get off the ground.
     
  6. Tony

    Tony White bear (Admin)
    Admin

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2003
    Messages:
    21,617
    Likes Received:
    390
    Location:
    Wales
    Just seen this, good post, a good reminder about being prepared. I walked out of the garage a few years back and did my ankle in, it's still not got the movement it had, I think foot/ankle/leg stuff is so bad because it kills your mobility.

    Glad you're getting better and thanks again for the reminder...
     
  7. crwydryny

    crwydryny Tenderfoot

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2008
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    south wales
    one of the many reasons it pays to do a first aid course that includes self rescue skills as well as always cary a well stocked first aid kit (I have one that lives in the bottom of my pack that includes everything I'll likely need and more)
     
  8. Bluebs4

    Bluebs4 Full Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Messages:
    813
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Bristol
    Not boring and not Revenant 2 but its amazing how venerable you feel when something snaps or cracks i had a tumble on the stairs and you would have thought id been shot if you found me , thanks for bringing it to the front of my mind i will prep a bit better .
     
  9. Tony

    Tony White bear (Admin)
    Admin

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2003
    Messages:
    21,617
    Likes Received:
    390
    Location:
    Wales
    What tends to happen to me now is if i have a fall or trip etc (It really doesn't happen very often :D) I feel ok, pain can be coped with etc, but the next day or day after I feel completely beaten up or my backs out.
     
  10. leealanr

    leealanr Full Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2006
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Not boring at all. Just reality and a very salutory tale.

    I rolled my 4 x 4 in september with 4bof us on board, completely my fault, had to be, no one else kwas involved.

    We were 5 hours outside of Addis Ababa, the nearest medical facility was hours away.

    It was only at this point did I realise quite how isolated we were.

    First aid kit, an excellent one designed to cope iwth most eventualities, was buried under all kids of everything and just not accessible.

    As it happened, apart from losing a very expensive car, we were alright.

    Lessons leTned.

    Dont rush.....

    Pack sensibly.

    Allow plenty of time for a journey.

    Look at what the possible outcomes could be first.

    The real world is still out there regardless of how much modernity we think we have with us.

    Hope you heal well.

    Alan l.
     
  11. MegaWoodsWalker

    MegaWoodsWalker Forager

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2014
    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Connecticut USA
    That's horrible. Sorry to hear about this. About 10 years ago I was hiking with a GF and she slipped and badly broke her ankle on the trail. Her foot was facing the wrong way. Took 11 hours to get her into an ambulance after I called for help on the cell. Injury from slips, trips and falls are often ignored online and we talk about bears, snakes and lightning however mechanical injuries are more likely IMHO.
     
  12. TeeDee

    TeeDee Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2008
    Messages:
    4,671
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Exeter
  13. SpruceTroll

    SpruceTroll New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Turku, Finland
    Good story, thanks for sharing!

    We all know those shiny outdoor toys and bushcraft gizmos get our juices flowing but it is good to be reminded that things need to be grounded in reality to really be useful when trouble comes a'knocking. Some people have mentioned the need for a good first aid kit, which I wholeheartedly agree with, but I'd like to specifically highlight one item, a serious knock-your-socks-off painkiller. One that allows you to walk down that mountain with your head under your arm if need be. I always have one in my survival kit. This comes from a military viewpoint but it is just as valid in civilian use as well. Pain messes up our heads and when you can't think straight, it's game over.

    There has been a number of outdoor and hiking related deaths this winter here in Finland and they roughly break down into two categories: Accidents and people not recognizing a dangerous situation before it was too late. There is no piece of gear that will save you from bad judgement, only experience and training can do that, and in case of an accident it is your capability to communicate your distress and reach help that will determine whether you survive or not.

    How would your survival kit look like if you would prioritize these scenarios? Worth contemplating.
     

Share This Page