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Oil for handles - again....

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by Janne, Nov 14, 2017 at 8:44 PM.

  1. Janne

    Janne Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Recenly, wife bought herself a new shotgun. As it is quite humid here, and she sometimes shoots in the rain, she improved the factory finish on the stock with Tru-Oil. Once she was finished, the stock looked stunning, deep lustre, depth to the grain, almost a 3D wood look!

    So I tried on a couple of the knife handles I have cobbled together. 4 coatings, steel wool (v. fine) polish inbetween. A couple were recently treated with the various oils I have been trying out.

    I have to say, fantastic result. Despite the high glossy finish no slipping. It is almost like the hand sticks to the handle. Very secure. Even when sweaty.
    Resists water very well, one knife I even immersed in luke warm water with dishwasher liguid for about 5 minutes. No change.
    Surface seems to be very hard.

    Has anybody else tried this product?

    I have tried BLO, Lo, Danish Oil, Teak oil, Tung Oil.
    I
     
  2. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I've used it. Anything made by Birchwood-Casey is worth every penny.
    Baikal s/s 20 = needed 3/16" more cast off and 1/4" more drop at the comb.
    Wooden stock so I cut it down and finished with several coats of Tru-Oil.
    I don't know what's in it but its a physically hard finish.

    As it's likely mineral-based, I'd not use it on spoons/forks/dishes.
    Thing is, it comes in convenient small containers so you won't have
    most of a liter, drying on some shelf.
     
  3. Janne

    Janne Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    It is almost like a varnish. Could it be a varnish? Varnish/ oil mix?

    Wife bought the Tru -oil made for Beretta. Did not speak to me first.
     
  4. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

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    I've only used it on a Beech stock. The old Weihrauch HW97 shot pellets true every time, but it's previous owners had used a stone wall as a mount and generally the stock had been bashed about.

    I took it down with paint stripper and hot water blasted it several times to clear the grain (much to many peoples horror). Once dry, it wanted to suck up the oil, tempting me to give it a good coat. Mistake.

    Tru Oil gets gummy, any runs from cracks and corners can end up messy and need sanding back. Having learned the hard way, once the thinly applied oil had hardened, I took it back with 1000 grit paper and lightly recoated. I did this several times and hung it up in the house to go off. The finish is glasslike, with a great depth for Beechwood. There's a word for the finish but I can't remember it, it means glasslike.

    If you look on guitar finishing forums, many recommend starting with shellac to seal the wood before Tru Oil. In my experience in a joinery, we always used sanding sealers prior to final finishing and the depth is improved with the more glasslike sealers and fine sanding than oils.
     
  5. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

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    Ah, I lie, my main abrasive was 00 grade steel wool to remove any burrs and key the surface.
     
    Robson Valley likes this.
  6. Tomteifi

    Tomteifi Nomad

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    I think the word you want is Chatoyance-a most desirable effect wanted on wooden finishes.
     
  7. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

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    That's the one. :)
     
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  8. Janne

    Janne Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    That is the correct term, I called it a 3D effect.....
    One wood is particularly beautiful, deep Chatoyance, look of grain, colour.

    It is our local mangrove.
     
  9. Tomteifi

    Tomteifi Nomad

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    Jatoba, if youre lucky enough to be able to get hold of the real original-aka real Brazilian cherry wood. Nicest wood I have or ever will see bar none. Simply oozes fantastic chatoyance. And elevates to a new level with oil eg hardwax osmo etc applied and buffed.
     

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