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Keeping warm feet

Discussion in 'Clothing & Footwear' started by Willcurrie, Nov 29, 2017.

  1. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I have done what Willcurrie is doing. That's why I offered a wide range of selections.
    Done it for decades in a photographer's blind. Wind and rain and snow.
    A decade of Canada goose hunting in open fields gives you time to think of kit.

    The biggest deal of all is to get out of the wind, whether it's freezing or not.

    I would not buy -50C boots as they're not needed.
    Insulated overpants and Felt Packs and something insulated to sit on work for me.
    The boots are waterproof. You all need that.
     
    Janne likes this.
  2. greenshooots

    greenshooots Nomad

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    combination i used in norway a couple of weeks ago kept me toasty in some extreme conditions i was using a pair of rouge summer boots with cotten socks and a pair of wool over topped off with snow overshoes

    greenshoots
     
    Robson Valley likes this.
  3. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    If you're wearing wellies then you are dry and out of the wind, so the chill you feel is circulation not moving.
    There's only so much that insulation can do, but if you don't keep the blood flowing your feet will get cold. Mind that the arteries pump blood, but the return system, the veins, works on muscular movement in the main.
    Keep the rest of you warm, wear wool socks in layers inside the wellies, and wriggle your toes and flex your ankles.
    The bits that chill quickest are your head, your back at the kidneys, the wrists and ankles (thus the feet and hands). If you're wearing tight clothes, like a belt, then that slows the circulation, and isn't a good idea. Old folks used to wear kidney belts, usually a band of knitted wool worn under their vests/undershirts, and wrist warmers, and socks that came up above the ankle.
    One of those gardening kneeling pads (pound stores :) ) works well to keep your feet off the chill of the ground when you're sitting unmoving, and if you can drape a car rug over your knees and down to your feet, it really helps too. I found that salopettes that came up to the chest were a very good thing indeed :D

    There's a fine line between keeping comfortably warm, and ending up sweating. Wool socks really help with both those issues, and your wellies won't stink either.
     
    Janne likes this.
  4. BEARDMASTER

    BEARDMASTER Member

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    I have had my feet near frost-bitten. What I learned from that is to use layers. Two pair of wool socks and welt liners is a great way to keep the toes warm.
    As suggested, using some kind of mat or even branches to keep your feet off the ground can make a big difference.

    It all depends on your blood circulation, activity and conditions you are in. In any way, keeping the feet dry is a must in any weather. Extra pair of socks are essential when going out for longer periods. And make sure not to lace your boots too tightly to allow normal blood circulation.

    Having a bit of extra room in your boots also helps. Just enough to have a warm air layer but not so much that you get blisters when walking around.
     
    Toddy likes this.
  5. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Can you sit still, do not move at all except breathe and move your eyes, for 15 minutes?
    That's what wildlife photographers, the good ones, must learn to do.
    Never fidget. Never fart. Sit still. This is really hard to learn to do.

    Then you begin to comprehend the need for insulation.
    I have been doing analog B&W outdoor photography for 60 years.
    Wildlife photography for less than 40 years.

    Sit still and stay warm and every possible camera you can imagine will pay for itself.

    Even Canada goose hunting. I can sit right out in the open with decoys around me.
    Don't move a muscle.
    If the geese jump up, a mile away, and see me twist around, I might as well go home.

    This only means that you have to try out different combinations of insulation.
    This thread has loads of good ideas, based on the experience of poor folks who
    just about froze their cojones.
     
    BEARDMASTER likes this.
  6. Janne

    Janne Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    The most important is to keep your feet dry. When I lived and spent the years in the Arctic, I used silk socks closest to the skin.
    Absorb well, dry fast and prevent chafing (=blisters).
    Expensive but worth every penny.

    One hard learned tip is to cut your toe nails short and file all edges. I learned this because when you are cold ( or spend a lot of hours walking in cold) the long nails that are pushed against the nailbed and the area where the nail is formed can cause a light bleeding and swelling. More so when it is cold. No fun losing toenails halfway through a weeks long bush trip....

    I have been told that sitting on cold can cause inflamed cohones and prostatitis. (cohonitis? :) )
     
  7. Jared

    Jared Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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  8. Janne

    Janne Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Cool invention, but I would say the traditional, carbon rod handwarmers are both lighter and warmer.
    They do not recharge your mobile device though!

    The charge in cameras lasts well, for days! Unless you are in severe cold, but you do not get those in UK. But then that charger has no power either.
     

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