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Different meats....

Discussion in 'Lovely Grub' started by Janne, Nov 1, 2017.

  1. daveO

    daveO Settler

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    This thread is making me hungry. A bit of black pudding and apple would go down a treat right now.
     
  2. crosslandkelly

    crosslandkelly A somewhat settled

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    White pudding or oatmeal pudding is a meat dish popular in Ireland, Scotland, Northumberland, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland. White pudding is similar to black pudding, but does not include blood; it consists of pork meat and fat, suet, bread and oatmeal formed into a large sausage.
    Whiteblack.JPG 20120904-sausage-city-spencers-jolly-posh-black-and-white-pudding-1.jpg
     
  3. mousey

    mousey Native

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    I was just about holding my own until you started putting pictures up! now I'm really hungry.

    Roll on Friday [tomorrow] as the boss buys a bacon roll to go with morning tea:)

    Choice of two fillings from:-

    Bacon, Egg, Black pudding, sausage, Lorn sausage.

    What would your choice of 2 be...?

    edit///////

    if choosing bacon = 2 strips
    Sausage = 2
    Lorn = 1 square
     
  4. Janne

    Janne Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I would go for Black Pudding and Bacon.
    Then shuffle them around so you have a Black Pudding Fest on one half and a Baconator on the other......
     
  5. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Huh? Andouille in the US is just a course ground pork sausage seasoned Cajun style. You need to go to France for the original made from chiiterlings and tripe.

    Which one did you try? The US (Cajun) or the original French? I've never had the latter.
     
  6. snappingturtle

    snappingturtle Forager

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    Tea an black pudding, liver an onion, steak an kidney, haggis, white pudding don't see it much here, shame as its dam good, also tongue sarnie's very common as a kid, and I recommend black pudding on a meat pizza.

    Have tried brain in a soup and pigs trotter's it was nice but all the above is much better!
     
    #26 snappingturtle, Nov 2, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2017
  7. Janne

    Janne Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I have had the US version of Andouille, and the French original.

    The US one is just 'another' sausage.
    The French one is an acquired taste I think. I have never wanted to know which part of the intestinal canal it is made from, but I suspect the part 'south' of the stomach..

    Pigs trotters - delicious in all the forms!
    Here in the Caribbean they use Cows/Bulls feet in the same way. Even better!

    Also salted Pork tails. Made to a soup.

    The Caribbean traditional foods are hugely varied. Lots of ways to cook the parts modern city people would not even give to their dogs.
    I have been told that the white masters took the nice meat cuts, and gave the rest to the darker brothers. I know some older ladies that cook for the local supermarket next door...

    They have taught me some nice cooking.
     
  8. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

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    French, in Dieppe. Long, thin poos basically.
     
  9. Janne

    Janne Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Smells like that is one of the spices yes!

    But they Frenchies make an awesome Boudin Noir and Blanc... (Blood sausage and white sausage)
     
  10. Tengu

    Tengu Full Member

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    Black pudding but it has to have fat in it or it is tasteless.

    But certainly nourishing.

    And haggis. I love haggis.
     
  11. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Fine by me. I've got smoked farm chicken Alfredo to build for supper with stained-glass pasta ( Italian mixed herbs rolled into it)
    Local vegetables. Tomorrow will be venison surprise.

    Must admit, I do like haggis but only with gravy.
    I like the way the power of suggestion can nauseate watchers.
     
  12. Janne

    Janne Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Fat is important. Flavour, energy.

    Hence the taste of pork belly vs ham.
    I like both though!
     
  13. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I am being reminded by the cat that it's half-past shrimp time.
    I'm down a quart, myself.
     
  14. Paul_B

    Paul_B Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Black and white puddings are not just Ireland, Scotland and those other countries /regions. It's all over the world in one form or another. IIRC parts of France do a really nice example of white pudding (well they would wouldn't they).

    Andouillette sausage. Mmmm! Had it in a French cafe/restaurant/bar. A business trip to a potential customer just out of Paris ended early so I had an awkward day out in Paris on expenses with boss. Sat down, started reading the menu. Waiter came over and snatched them away saying "they're not for you, English! Here you go, LA Carter in English". Let me tell you their translation wasn't right at all!

    Worked out well though because it just said spicy sausage for Andouillette sausage. So with a glint in my eye I pursuaded the boss to order it. I loved not and ate every morsel of it. All the while my boss watched on in amazement and disgust having lost his appetite.

    I must admit that the first cut of the knife surprised me. It's so tightly packed that it's like that toy with the snakes that fly out when you open it. You have to try one in France once in your life at least. An experience.

    BTW Bury black pudding. It's got to be from one of the older producers from Bury, Lancashire, England.

    Haggis deep fried in batter! Avoid even in Scotland. Along with virtually anything else in batter that a Scottish chicken and chips shops sell that's not fish.

    Chicken livers, fried gently over hot, buttered toast. That my friends is one of my favorite breakfasts. It needs nothing more and nothing less. Perfection!

    Then my dad makes the best chicken liver pate I've ever tasted!

    Can you still buy brain these days post mad cow desease? I thought they took all brain and nervous system matter out of the food chain.
     
  15. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Now your mentioning chicken livers has reminded me of fried gizzards.
     
  16. Paul_B

    Paul_B Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Booths stock chicken livers occasionally think they had hearts too. Not tried hearts nor trotters or pigs ears. Apparently they're nice.
    Chicken livers though. Mmmm!

    Phone autocorrect seems to think I have an unhealthy interest in chickens. It keeps correcting livers as lovers. I can categorically state that I am not a chicken lover nor do I eat those that are. I do b however like eating chicken livers.

    Just thought I ought to clarify in case an autocorrect got through!
     
  17. Janne

    Janne Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Pigs ears - almost like crunchy bacon
    Trotters - no muscle meat, nice skin, the gelatinous soft parts is what you eat . Love them, but to be frank not much food and to be even franker, not much flavor. Boiled pig's Head is better.

    Chicken hearts - nice. Somewhat rubbery consistency, similar to Gizzards which are a bit chewier.

    All hearts are constructed of a different type of Striated Muscle than normal muscles, hence different feel when chewing it.

    One nice thing to go is to take deboned, skinless chicken thighs, and chicken hears, 50/50 in weight, and grind them to minced chicken meat.

    When you mention chicken lovers, it reminds me of the movie '1900' by Bertolucci. De Niro, Depardieu, Hayden, Sutherland, Lancaster.
    Try that for quality!
    Fantastic movie, but you need to watch the uncut (US?) version.
     
  18. Janne

    Janne Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Beef Heart is a great cut. Very flavoursome, superb in casseroles.
     
  19. Janne

    Janne Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I would love to try the Inuit delicacies raw whale blubber, raw whale eyes and the Greenland food fermented bird.
     
  20. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Inuit chefs are in an absolute battle with Health Canada over serving traditional foods.
    There's growing support suggesting the posture is no more than conventional discrimination
    to force them to pay for southern food (and the obscene transport costs.)

    The most vocal critics are the whites that live in the north and their vitriol is directed at Ottawa.

    They get it done, somehow. First Nations restaurants are popping up across Canada with trad, food.
    I've had Cree pike, bison, lilypad root and stewed dried berries. Heaven on earth.

    If I get a side of bison in Jan/Feb, I'll ask for heart and liver, too.

    I make a typical seasoned crumb stuffing for chicken.
    Moistened with chicken stock, a "rod" of that goes into each skinless, boneless chicken thigh.
    Cut side down, I bake those by the dozen in the oven.
    Everybody gets their own little "chicken" with stuffing.
    Leftovers freeze beautifully.
     

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